Psychology (PSYC)

Courses

PSYC 121   Applied Psychology (3 Hours)

The course will focus on learning how to apply psychological principles in order to better understand one's own experience (cognitive, behavioral and emotional) and that of other people. This course is not a substitute for Introduction to Psychology and will not meet the prerequisite requirement for advanced psychology courses. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PSYC 130   Introduction to Psychology (3 Hours)  

This basic introduction to psychology includes the study of biological aspects of behavior, the brain, consciousness, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, stress, maturation and development, learning and memory, normal and abnormal personality, and social psychology. This course is the prerequisite for all advanced-level psychology courses. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PSYC 130H   HON: Introduction to Psychology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

PSYC 205   Human Sexuality* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

PSYC 205, Human Sexuality, is a balanced and thoughtful account of what is known about sexuality from various perspectives. A broad and representative survey of research is presented in a number of topical areas. Psychobiology, sexual development during childhood and adolescence, sexual interactions, love relationships and behavior, gender issues, sexual orientation, health issues and diseases, and sexual problems and solutions will be studied. Primary emphasis will be placed on the individual and the couple as a unit of analysis. Class discussions of issues relating to human sexuality will be encouraged. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PSYC 205H   HON: Human Sexuality* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

PSYC 209   Statistics in Psychological Research* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PSYC 130 and MATH 171.

This course introduces the use of statistics as applied to various research designs. The course "Methodology in Psychology" (PSYC210) and this course are designed for those planning to major in psychology. A wide range of statistical methods are used to analyze data collected in psychological research. Examples of different kinds of statistical methods will be used in this course to analyze data, informing the student of how to apply the proper statistical methods to data examples. Descriptive and inferential statistical methods with both parametric and nonparametric statistical tools are studied. The course emphasis is on which statistical tests are appropriate for transforming gathered observations into meaningful and useful information relevant to everyday life and the studies in various fields of psychology. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PSYC 210   Research Methods in Psychology* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PSYC 130 and MATH 171.

This course deals with scientific research methods utilized in the social sciences, especially psychology, sociology, political science and anthropology. The course examines a wide range of data collection methodologies including observation, questionnaire construction, and controlled experimentation. The course will be beneficial for analyzing and evaluating the quality of research findings reported in both the popular and academic press. It will also be useful to those who plan to engage in occupations requiring the use of research methodology. This course may not be offered every semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PSYC 215   Child Development* (3 Hours)  

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

This course is a comprehensive account of human development from conception through adolescence. The course integrates genetic, biological, physical and anthropological influences with psychological processes and explores determinants of behavior from a genetic and environmental perspective. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PSYC 215H   HON: Child Development* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

PSYC 218   Human Development* (3 Hours)  

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

This course is a comprehensive account of human psychological and physical development from conception through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and death. The course integrates genetic, biological, physiological and anthropological influences with the psychological process, and explores determinants of development from both hereditary and environmental perspectives. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PSYC 218H   HON: Human Development* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

PSYC 220   Social Psychology* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

Social psychology is the study of social influence on behavior and cognition. Social psychology explores our relationships with others, our interdependency, and the mutual influence we have on one another. The course will cover concepts such as attitude formation, attitude change, prejudice, aggression, affiliation, obedience to authority, and conformity; special emphasis will be placed on fostering prosocial behavior and how our attitudes toward self and others are influenced by race, ethnicity, gender, age, religious beliefs, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and political beliefs. The course requires students to acquire a critical awareness of research methodology. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PSYC 220H   HON: Social Psychology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

PSYC 221   Environmental Psychology* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PSYC 130 or ITMD 121 or BIOL 130.

Environmental psychology will allow students to explore the relationship between the environment and human behavior. The premise of the course is that the social setting, environmental setting, and individual behavior are interrelated. The focus will be on (1) our relationships with the human built environment, (2) our relationships with the natural environment, (3) how humans adapt to changing environments, and (4) how we can coordinate our behavior to achieve sustainable relationships with our environment. The content of the course will appeal to individuals interested in urban planning, architecture, interior design, ecological sustainability, and community physical and psychological well-being. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PSYC 225   Educational Psychology* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

This course addresses issues that apply theories of psychology to the educational environment. Topics included in the study of educational psychology include research methodology, theories of human development, principles of learning, the psychology of motivation, theories of intelligence, testing and assessment techniques, and career development. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PSYC 250   Health Psychology* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

This course covers content, methods and theory regarding the interplay between psychological and biological determinants of health and illness and examines how these factors relate to health status. The course focus is on the application of psychological methods, principles of maintenance of health, prevention of disease, treatment of illness, and rehabilitation and recovery from impaired health. It follows an interdisciplinary approach to content and instruction. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PSYC 250H   HON: Health Psychology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

PSYC 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

PSYC 292   Special Topics:* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness.

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of Psychology, not usually taught in the curriculum. This course may expand upon a topic introduced in a current course, synthesize topics that cut across existing courses, or explore a topic not currently addressed in the Psychology curriculum. Students may repeat Special Topics in Psychology for credit but only on different topics.

PSYC 121

  • Title: Applied Psychology
  • Number: PSYC 121
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The course will focus on learning how to apply psychological principles in order to better understand one's own experience (cognitive, behavioral and emotional) and that of other people. This course is not a substitute for Introduction to Psychology and will not meet the prerequisite requirement for advanced psychology courses. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe, integrate and apply the theoretical systems in psychology to the self and others.
  2. Recognize and apply behavior management principles to one's self and others.
  3. Observe and begin to modify cognitive, emotional and behavioral aspects of the self.
  4. Relate cognitive approaches to improving one's intellectual functioning and in managing interpersonal conflict.
  5. Explore various areas of interpersonal relationships.
  6. Differentiate between the lay use of psychological principles and trained professional operating within a traditional organized social service community.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Theoretical Frameworks
   A. Identify the Humanistic, Behavioral, Psychoanalytical and Cognitive
approaches.
   B. Distinguish the role each theory has in psychological functioning
and in therapy.
   C. Apply the different theoretical approaches to self and others.

II. Self and Person Perception
   A. Explain and relate principles of the Psychoanalytic,
Neo-Psychoanalytic, and Transactional analysis to life-span development
issues.
   B. Examine and evaluate self-schema and how thinking influences
attributions about self.
   C. Judge problems and issues of person perception to attitudes,
stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination and conflict resolution.
   D. Attempt to change ways of thinking about self.
   E. Be sensitive to gender and cultural diversity.
   F. Explore one's relationships including in love, sexuality, 
loneliness and solitude.
   G. Identify views toward death and dying.

III. Behavioral Change
   A. Record various behaviors and select areas for self-change.
   B. Study one's time management, learning, assertiveness and
communication styles.
   C. Communicate and develop a plan to survey one's  view of self which
includes one's values, goals, decision-making and emotional coping
styles.
   D. Determine factors for organizational/societal change.
   E. Personalize components involved in career planning.
   F. Plan strategies to cope with stress and evaluate how present life
style decisions influence future health.
   G. Describe sexually transmitted diseases and evaluate ways of
preventing their occurrence.
   H. Distinguish how different mental health professionals can facilitate
personal change and growth.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

      A minimum of four examinations               50% of grade

      Class project involving a personal behavior 
         change over the semester                  25% of grade

      Personal journal that includes reaction to
         each class session and relevant book 
         and/or handout assignments                25% of grade
                                                  100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PSYC 130

  • Title: Introduction to Psychology
  • Number: PSYC 130
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This basic introduction to psychology includes the study of biological aspects of behavior, the brain, consciousness, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, stress, maturation and development, learning and memory, normal and abnormal personality, and social psychology. This course is the prerequisite for all advanced-level psychology courses. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the definition of psychology, specialties and perspectives pervasive in the field
  2. Describe issues in research methods, statistical analysis and ethics in psychology
  3. Compare biological parallels with human behavior
  4. Discuss theories and professional issues in development over the life span
  5. Explain current and past developments in sensation and perception
  6. Define physiology of sensory systems
  7. Discuss theories of states of consciousness
  8. Share current and past issues in cognitive psychology
  9. Discuss major theories in learning and their impact on behavior
  10. Explain human behavior in terms of motivation and emotion
  11. Discuss theories of personality
  12. Define specific psychological disorders, their diagnosis and causes
  13. Cite therapeutic techniques and issues in clinical psychology
  14. Discuss current issues and importance of health psychology
  15. Explain human and social behavior and theories which attempt to explain the social human 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Foundations of Psychology
   A. Define psychology.
   B. Identify scientific attitudes and theories.
   C. Describe research methods in psychology.
II. Biological Roots of Behavior
   A. Present information about natural selection and evolution.
   B. Identify elements of the nervous system that affect behavior of organisms.
   C. Explain how the brain directs behavior.
   D. Describe how the endocrine system affects behavior.
III. Development Across the Lifespan
   A. Identify developmental issues.
   B. Describe prenatal development.
   C. Describe development in infancy.
   D. Describe development in childhood.
   E. Describe development in adolescence.
   F. Describe development in adulthood.
IV. Sensation and Perception
   A. Define sensation and explain its function.
   B. Describe the structure and function of each sensory system.
   C. Define perception and explain its function.
      1. Identify basic issues in perception.
      2. Describe perceptual organization.
V. States of Consciousness
   A. Identify different states of consciousness.
   B. Discuss sleep and dreams.
   C. Discuss the effects of drugs on consciousness.
VI. Learning and Thinking
   A. Describe the three different levels of learning.
      1. Describe respondent conditioning.
      2. Describe operant conditioning.
      3. Describe social-cognitive learning.
      4. Present examples of each of these types of learning.
   B. Discuss the process of memory.
      1. Discuss theories of memory formation.
      2. Discuss how forgetting is explained.
      3. Demonstrate ways to improve memory.
   C. Describe thinking and language.
      1. Describe concept formation and thinking.
      2. Define language and present the evolution of language skills.
      3. Discuss theories of language acquisition.
      4. Discuss how thinking and language are related.
   D. Discuss intelligence.
      1. Identify theories of intelligence.
      2. Describe the measurement of intelligence.
VII. Motivation and Emotion
   A. Describe the theories of motivation.
      1. Present concepts of motivation.
      2. Describe biological forces: hunger, thirst, sexuality.
      3. Identify social motives, such as achievement motivation.
   B. Describe the theories of emotion.
      1. Describe the physiology of emotion.
      2. Describe the expression of emotion cross-culturally.
      3. Describe human behavior in the presence of emotion.
VIII. Personality, Disorders, Therapy, and Health
   A. Discuss the different theories of personality.
      1. Explain the psychoanalytic perspective.
      2. Explain the trait perspective.
      3. Explain the social-cognitive learning perspective.
      4. Compare and contrast the theories of personality.
   B. Discuss psychological disorders.
      1. Present perspectives on psychological disorder including cultural
interpretations.
      2. List and describe various psychological disorders.
   C. Discuss psychotherapy.
      1. Identify methods of psychological therapy.
      2. Describe biomedical therapies.
      3. Discuss the social roots of psychological disorders.
   D. Discuss the role of psychology in health.
      1. Describe stress and illness relationships.
      2. Explain pain and its control.
      3. Present health promotion and prevention campaigns.
IX. Social Behavior
   A. Define social psychology.
      1. Explain how social thinking arises.
      2. Explain social influences.
      3. Discuss social relations.
   B. Discuss social diversity.
      1. Describe cultural diversity.
      2. Discuss gender diversity.
X. Statistical Reasoning
   A. Explain how psychologists use statistics to describe data.
   B. Explain how psychologists generalize from data.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. At least four unit exams that test conceptual understanding of the
course material must be administered. A maximum of 25% of these exams may
be administered in an open book, open note and/or take home format. It is
required that at least 75% of these exams be in-class/closed note exams.
For online course exam guidelines, please see individual instructor
syllabus.

2. Writing assignments are crucial components to the Introduction to
Psychology course. At least one mandatory writing assignment is required
and should comprise a minimum of 20% of the student overall grade in the
course. Writing assignment(s) may include but are not limited to essay
questions, personal journals, research paper, article review, reaction
paper, specific assignments, outside readings and/or other written
assignments at the discretion of the Professor. The intent is to require
both written expression and familiarity with the content in Psychology.

3. A comprehensive final exam, in addition to the four unit exams
mentioned above, shall be given during the final exam period. This final
exam shall be created by the Professor and must be administered as an
in-class, closed note/closed book exam.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PSYC 130H

No information found.

PSYC 205

  • Title: Human Sexuality*
  • Number: PSYC 205
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

Description:

PSYC 205, Human Sexuality, is a balanced and thoughtful account of what is known about sexuality from various perspectives. A broad and representative survey of research is presented in a number of topical areas. Psychobiology, sexual development during childhood and adolescence, sexual interactions, love relationships and behavior, gender issues, sexual orientation, health issues and diseases, and sexual problems and solutions will be studied. Primary emphasis will be placed on the individual and the couple as a unit of analysis. Class discussions of issues relating to human sexuality will be encouraged. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe and evaluate research methods in psychology and those methods specific to human sexuality.
  2. Identify the various contributions made by biology and explain how developmental changes affect sexual behavior.
  3. Analyze how sexual behavior is influenced by the interactive forces of environment and biology to influence couple interactions.
  4. Using psychological methods, hypothesize how human sexual behavior might be changed to control reproduction, to remediate sexual dysfunctions and disorders, and to prevent the spread of communicable disease.
  5. Describe cross-cultural similarities and differences in sexual mores and behaviors.
  6. Describe and explain how human interaction affects relationships in human sexual/love situations; identify how those relationships progress over time; and identify ways theory and research have suggested those relationships can be modified.
  7. Identify statutes in Kansas and Missouri, as well as federal statutes, which have focused on human sexual behavior, and identify civil liberties and civil rights associated with human sexuality.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sex in Perspective
   A. Name the reasons for studying sexuality
      1. Identify American cultural changes over time
      2. Compare sexual cross-cultural similarities and differences
      3. Explain sexual suppression and exploitation
   B. Identify historical effects on sexual behavior
      1. Find evidence of sexual ambivalence in modern America
      2. Group the various religious views and their histories
      3. Illustrate myths and misconceptions about sex
      4. Present legal aspects of human sexuality and identify sexual
rights and limits under the law
   C. List scientific methods to study sex
      1. Investigate case studies
      2. Read results of surveys
      3. Explore laboratory observations from text and other sources
      4. Compare ethnographic studies regarding human sexuality
      5. List outcome of various experiments
      6. Discuss ethics of sexual research

II.   The Psychobiology of Sex
   A. Describe the anatomy and physiology of the sexual body considering
the following areas:
      1. Women's genitals
      2. Women's internal sex organs
      3. Men's genitals
      4. Men's internal sex organs
      5. Erogenous zones
      6. Brain structures and sex
   B. The physiology of sex
      1. List the stages in the sexual response cycle
      2. Describe the psychobiology of sexual arousal
      3. Explore the aphrodisiacs and anaphrodisiacs
   C. Trace the progress from conception through pregnancy
      1. Describe the processes in conception
      2. Identify and describe pregnancy
      3. Infertility
      4. Modern technology
      5. Identify motives for parenthood
   D. List methods of birth control
      1. The history of birth control
      2. Methods:  pro and con
      3. Abortion
      4. Why people do not use birth control

III.  Sexual Relationships and Behavior
   A. Describe love and intimate relationships
      1. The nature of close relationships
      2. The nature of love
      3. How and why relationships begin
      4. The evolution of relationships
      5. How to be a good partner/how to find one
   B. Identify sexual activities
      1. Sexual fantasy
      2. Masturbation
      3. Couple techniques
      4. Communication
   C. Describe unconventional sexual behavior and discuss possible causes
for the following:
      1. Voyeurism
      2. Exhibitionism
      3. Obscene telephone calling
      4. Fetishism
      5. Pedophilia
      6. Other paraphilias
      7. Treating paraphilias
   D. Sexual problems and solutions
      1. Name common sexual problems and describe incidence
      2. Describe theories that explain the origins of sexual problems
      3. Name the general principles of sex therapy
      4. Explain how problems of sexual desire and arousal create
difficulties
      5. How have these problems been treated?
      6. Describe the problems of painful sex and vaginismus
      7. Investigate the incidence of problems with orgasm
      8. Evaluate sex therapy:  Does it work?

IV.   The Origins and Development of Sexuality
   A. Describe the states of sexual development in childhood
      1. Explain how gender is influenced
      2. What are common sexual and gender-based behaviors in childhood
      3. Develop a list of influences on gender and sexuality
      4. Describe how the family is thought to influence gender and
sexuality
   B. Describe sexual development in adolescence and adulthood
      1. List and explain theories of how puberty and adolescence affect
adult gender and sexuality
      2. Describe normal and abnormal adult sexuality
      3. Identify effects aging has on sex and gender
   C. Sexual orientation
      1. Identify studies of statistics of sexual orientation
      2. List and compare psychological theories
      3. Identify cross-cultural treatment of homosexuality
      4. Focus on attitudes prevalent in the culture toward homosexuality

V. Social and Health Issues
   A. Describe the prevalence of sexual abuse and exploitation of the
following kinds:
      1. Rape
      2. Sexual harassment
      3. Child sexual abuse
   B. Identify sex as a commercial enterprise in the following areas:
      1. Pornography
      2. Prostitution
      3. The future of commercial sex
      4. Where do you draw the line?
   C. Identify sexually transmitted diseases and explain how the following
diseases are transmitted, treated and prevented:
      1. Bacterial infections of the cervix and the male urethra
      2. Viral infections
      3. Syphilis
      4. Parasitic infestations
      5. Vaginitis
      6. Other STDs
   D. Describe how sex should be dealt with in the following situations to
promote well-being:
      1. Sexuality in sickness and in health
      2. Disability
      3. The sexually healthy child
      4. The sexually healthy society
   E. Perspectives on loving and sex as prosocial behavior
      1. Describe lessons from other primates
      2. Explain research results regarding sex and violence
      3. Discuss Sternberg's model of emotion, passion and commitment
      4. Discuss research results relating to physical affection in
childhood and adult love/sexual adjustment
      5. Discuss maintaining long-term sexual adjustment

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

      A minimum of five examinations      40% of grade
      A library research paper            20% of grade
      Class exercises, etc., and quizzes  40% of grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The student should be prepared to participate in class activities and discussions of topics not often discussed in public. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PSYC 205H

No information found.

PSYC 209

  • Title: Statistics in Psychological Research*
  • Number: PSYC 209
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PSYC 130 and MATH 171.

Description:

This course introduces the use of statistics as applied to various research designs. The course "Methodology in Psychology" (PSYC210) and this course are designed for those planning to major in psychology. A wide range of statistical methods are used to analyze data collected in psychological research. Examples of different kinds of statistical methods will be used in this course to analyze data, informing the student of how to apply the proper statistical methods to data examples. Descriptive and inferential statistical methods with both parametric and nonparametric statistical tools are studied. The course emphasis is on which statistical tests are appropriate for transforming gathered observations into meaningful and useful information relevant to everyday life and the studies in various fields of psychology. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the scientific process and be able to identify and assess the value of statistical methods.
  2. Apply the correct statistical methodology to presented data.
  3. Utilize the appropriate statistical analysis to collected data.
  4. Explain in writing the assumptions regarding various statistical tests.
  5. Draw conclusion about whether a relationship between or among variables is supported by the results of the study. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General Introduction
   A. Recognize examples of descriptive and inferential statistics.
   B. Provide written examples of discrete and continuous variables.
   C. Transform data observations into variables.
   D. Discuss the functions of hypothesis testing and variables
(independent, dependent, and confounding).
   E. Apply the use of levels of measurement.

II. Frequency Distributions Graphs
   A. Recognize shapes of distributions of numbers when plotted
graphically.
   B. Identify types of distributions and their uses.
   C. Draw various types of graphs from provided data.
   D. Describe the uses of various measures of central tendency and
calculate standard deviation.
   E. Discuss the importance of the normal curve, its shape and its
assumptions.

III. Sampling, Probability and the Normal Curve
   A. Name the various advantages and disadvantages of various types of
samples.
   B. Discuss types of samples and identify in what type of research they
are used.
   C. Using provided problems, calculate probability statistics.
   D. Describe how probability is used in inferential statistics.
   E. State the differences expected when a type 1 or type 2 error has
been made.
   F. Calculate "z" scores and explain their relationship to type 1 and 2
error.

IV. Hypothesis Testing
   A. Name the steps in hypothesis testing.
   B. Discuss standardization and its uses in test construction and
research.
   C. Describe meta analysis and its uses.

V. Confidence Intervals, Effect Size and Statistical Power
   A. Articulate the meaning of statistical significance.
   B. Calculate confidence levels with "z" and "t" and describe how they
relate to the normal curve.
   C. Discuss how statistical significance relates to sample size.
   D. Compare and contrast statistical significance and effect size.
   E. Calculate statistics for significance and effect size and relate
their meaning to the concept of normal curve.
   F. State the factors that influence statistical power.
   G. Describe meta analysis as it relates to the normal curve and effect
size.

VI. What To Do When No Normal Distribution Is Available
   A. Describe the reasoning used to estimate a population from a single
sample.
   B. Calculate the estimated standard deviation.
   C. Explain the concept of "degrees of freedom."
   D. Name the six steps for single-sample "t" tests.

VII. Comparing Two Samples
   A. Describe how tests of two sets of data can be compared and when they
can be used.
   B. Name the steps for hypothesis testing.
   C. Describe the similarities and differences between a single test and
a comparison of two samples.
   D. Calculate the "t" test for paired samples.
   E. Explain differences between a within group and between group
samples.

VIII. The Analysis Of Variance
   A. Explain the general value of analysis of variance.
   B. Describe the dangers of type 1 errors when multiple "t" tests are
used.
   C. Describe differences when between groups ANOVA is used and when
within groups ANOVA is used.
   D. Describe how "t" and "z" tests are related to ANOVA.
   E. State the hypothesis steps that occur in ANOVA.
   F. Explain how degrees of freedom are identified.
   G. Calculate the sum of squares for a between group and within group.
   H. Describe the meaning of the resultant ANOVA.
   I. Discuss the mathematical testing to be done after the ANOVA.
   J. Define differences in two-way ANOVA.
   K. Name the steps in two-way ANOVA.
   L. Contrast the one-way and two-way ANOVA.

IX. Correlation And Regression
   A. Describe correlation.
   B. Discuss the meaning of positive and negative correlation.
   C. Create a scatter plot of provided data.
   D. Calculate the Pearson Correlation Coefficient.
   E. Discuss the limitations of correlation.
   F. Discuss the effect size versus the statistical significance of the
"r" value.
   G. Describe the concept of partial correlation and explain how it is
used.
   H. Describe how regression relates to correlation.
   I. Calculate regression using "z" tests.
   J. Describe how multiple and simple regression differ.

X. Nonparametric Statistics
   A. Differentiate between parametric and nonparametric statistics.
   B. Explain what types of data require nonparametric statistics to be
used.
   C. Describe what types of data analyses should be used with nominal
data and ordinal data.
   D. Calculate chi-square, Cramer's effect size for chi-square.
   E. Identify what tests to use with ordinal data.
   F. Calculate the Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test, Spearman Rank-Order
Correlation Coefficient, Mann-Whitney U Test and Kruskal-Wallis H Test.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams 40-60%
Homework 40-60%

Grade Criteria:
A = 89.5 - 100%
B = 79.5 - 89.4%
C = 69.5 - 79.4%
D = 59.5 - 69.4%
F = Less than 59.5%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Calculator needed. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PSYC 210

  • Title: Research Methods in Psychology*
  • Number: PSYC 210
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PSYC 130 and MATH 171.

Description:

This course deals with scientific research methods utilized in the social sciences, especially psychology, sociology, political science and anthropology. The course examines a wide range of data collection methodologies including observation, questionnaire construction, and controlled experimentation. The course will be beneficial for analyzing and evaluating the quality of research findings reported in both the popular and academic press. It will also be useful to those who plan to engage in occupations requiring the use of research methodology. This course may not be offered every semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the scientific process and assess the value of scientific research.
  2. Reflect on the ethical concerns and procedures of research on human subjects.
  3. Learn the components of and how to create a research design in order to carry out successful social research.
  4. Utilize the various methodologies necessary to engage in successful social research.
  5. Analyze data and draw conclusions by using measurement and basic statistics.
  6. Learn how to write a research paper that reports significant findings.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Behavior of the Scientist and the Scientific Weltanschauung
   A. Describe deductive reasoning (Scientific Method) 
   B. Describe inductive reasoning (Grounded Theory) 
   C. Explain the influence of bias on the behavior of the scientist
   D. Describe ethical guidelines for scientists

II. Generating Research Questions
   A. Discuss the sources of ideas for research
   B. Conduct a review of the literature relevant to a study
   C. Utilize the relevant library resources, including technology, to aid
in the literature review

III. The Process of Social Research:  Create a Research Design
   A. State the Problem
   B. Construct Hypotheses
   C. Identify Variables
      i. independent variables
      ii. dependent variables
      iii. constants
   D. Operationally Define Variables
   E. Describe the selection of sample subjects/participants
   F. Research Methods
      i. Learn and create a naturalistic observation
      ii. Learn and create a correlational designs
      iii. Create experimental designs including group design and
single-subject designs
      iv. Create a content analysis
      v. Survey methods
         1. Construct a Questionnaire 
         2. Conduct an Interview
      vi. Observation
         1. Engage in Participant Observation
         2. Engage in Non-participant Observation
      vii. Understand Evaluation Research
      viii. Describe the use of existing resources in research

IV. Analyzing the Data
   A. Apply basic Statistical Analysis to data
   B. Employ Qualitative Analysis
   C. Utilize SPSS for Computer Analysis of data
   D. Generalize the data
   E. Describe Reliability and Validity

V. Writing the Research Report
   A. Create a Time Frame
   B. Know the Audience for a paper
   C. Draw Conclusions
   D. Format the paper correctly
      i. Tables, charts, graphs
      ii. Chapter divisions

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50% of grade:  A minimum of four (4) examinations    
50% of grade:  A minimum of four (4) projects designed to apply the
methods and processes being learned 

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PSYC 215

  • Title: Child Development*
  • Number: PSYC 215
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

Description:

This course is a comprehensive account of human development from conception through adolescence. The course integrates genetic, biological, physical and anthropological influences with psychological processes and explores determinants of behavior from a genetic and environmental perspective. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate the ability to apply, analyze and critique research in the study of child development.
  2. Compare traditional and contemporary theories in child development.
  3. Identify and critically review the metatheoretical issues in child development theories.
  4. Explain the rationale for changes in the perceived importance of certain topics and ideas, and shifts in theoretical focus over time.
  5. Identify prenatal influences that affect a child's growth and development.
  6. Describe how physical, cognitive, social and emotional factors contribute and interact to effect change throughout childhood.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Theory and Research in Child Development

A. Trace the history of the conceptualization of children from early to modern times.

B. Identify and describe the following theoretical issues in child development:

1. Nature/Nurture

2. Continuity/Discontinuity

3. Stability/Change

C. Explain the importance of developmental milestones and secular trends in describing child development.

D. Describe the various research methods used to study children.

E. Differentiate descriptive, correlational and experimental research and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each.

F. Identify the various research designs used to study children and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each.

G. Define validity and reliability and explain why these concepts are important to developmental research.

H. Evaluate the cross-cultural aspects of research in child development.

I. List and explain the APA guidelines governing research with children.

J. Explain how the APA guidelines governing research with children provide protection for children in research situations.

II. Biological and Environmental Foundations of Child Development

A. Explain the genetic process involved in conception.

B. List the most common genetic abnormalities and their causes.

C. Explain the process of fertilization and creation of the zygote.

D. Trace physical development through the germinal, embryonic and fetal period.

E. Evaluate the role of the environment in modifying developmental outcomes.

F. Identify the three stages of the birth process and describe what occurs during each stage.

G. List the various methods of childbirth; explain the rationale of each method and list the advantages and disadvantages of each.

H. Identify birth complications, discuss their cause and describe the implications of each for later development.

I. Discuss infant mortality and the conditions that can increase or decrease infant mortality.

J. Explain the importance of the first years of life (infancy) to later development.

1. Describe various neonatal reflexes and explain their function

2. Identify and describe the various physiological states of the newborn

3. Illustrate examples of classical and operant conditioning in newborns

4. Describe how imitation and habituation/dishabituation provide support for infant learning abilities

5. Identify fine motor skills and trace their development through infancy

6. Identify gross motor skills and trace their development through infancy

7. Describe the role of maturation and experience in motor development

8. Explain the development of the individual sense modalities in infants

9. Define intermodal perception and evaluate arguments as to whether these abilities are innate or learned

10. Explain the impact of early stimulation in infancy and discuss the implications of enriched or impoverished environments

III. Physical Growth and Development

A. Trace the physical changes that take place between infancy and puberty.

1. Describe secular trends in human growth

2. Identify what the following terms mean with respect to brain development:

a. Proliferation

b. Migration

c. Differentiation

d. Glial cells

e. Cell death

3. Describe the development of the cerebral cortex

4. Explain what is meant by brain lateralization and describe the effect of this lateralization on behavior

5. Identify the critical periods in brain growth

6. Trace the sequence of pubertal events in boys and girls

a. Explain familial and cultural influences on children's responses to menarche and spermarche

b. Describe the effects of the timing of the onset of puberty for both boys and girls

B. Evaluate the nature/nurture argument with respect to all aspects of physical growth.

IV. Cognitive and Language Development

A. Piaget

1. Describe the origin and motivation for Piaget's cognitive developmental theory

2. Identify and explain the key concepts of Piagetian theory with respect to:

a. Stages of cognitive development

b. Equilibrium; schemes

c. Assimilation and accommodation

3. Describe the cognitive achievements of each Piagetian stage

4. Describe the cognitive limitations of each Piagetian stage

5. Evaluate the criticisms of Piagetian theory with respect to the following:

a. Continuity/discontinuity

b. Underestimation of children's abilities

6. Evaluate the implications of Piaget's theory for education

B. Vygotsky

1. Describe the origin and motivation for Vygotsky's theory of cognitive development

2. Identify and describe the key concepts of Vygotsky's theory

3. Compare and contrast Piaget's and Vygotsky's view of the development and function of private speech

4. Evaluate the implications of Vygotsky's theory for education

C. Information processing

1. Compare information processing theory with cognitive developmental and contextual perspectives

2. Compare the store and levels of processing theories of memory

3. Distinguish between the differentiation and enrichment theories of perceptual processing

4. Describe the following features of cognitive development in children from an information-processing perspective:

a. Attentional processes

b. Memory strategies

c. Memory retrieval

5. Explain the function of scripts in children's everyday life

6. Trace the development of metacognitive knowledge and self-regulation

7. Evaluate the application of information-processing theory to education

8. Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the information processing approach

D. Intelligence

1. Identify the various definitions of intelligence; distinguish the traditional definitions from more recent conceptualizations

2. Trace the history of intelligence assessment

3. Define and explain the traditional approach to describing IQ and the deviation IQ

4. Discuss the various instruments used to evaluate children's intelligence; specify the unique features of each and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each measure

5. Analyze the effectiveness of intelligence tests in measuring academic success, vocational success and psychological adjustment

6. Evaluate the research on racial, ethnic and socio-economic differences in IQ

7. Describe the genetic and environmental influences on intelligence

8. Discuss the link between intelligence and creativity

E. Language

1. List the four main areas of language skill

2. Trace the course of language development

3. Describe the behavioral view of language acquisition and compare it with Chomsky's theory of language acquisition

4. Evaluate both the behavioral and Chomsky's perspective of language acquisition as an explanation of how children learn language

5. Describe the interactionist perspective of language development

6. Explain the following terms as they relate to language development:

a. Critical periods

b. Individual differences

c. Universals

d. Comprehension

e. Production

7. Explain metalinguistic development

V. Personality and Social Development

A. Emotional development

1. Describe the various methods for measuring the quality and intensity of emotional reactions

2. Explain the behaviorist, social-learning, cognitive-developmental and discrepancy theories of emotional development

3. Analyze research addressing the universality and social context of emotional expression

4. Explain how the ability of children to recognize and respond to the emotions of others develops

5. Describe temperament and list the methods used to assess temperamental qualities in children

6. Discuss the biological aspects of temperament and the stability of temperament in childhood and adolescence

7. Evaluate the information regarding temperamental qualities as predictors of later behavior

8. Describe the following perspectives explaining attachment:

a. Psychoanalytic

b. Behavioral

c. Ethological

d. Ecological

9. Evaluate the importance of Harlow's research on attachment

10. Describe how Ainsworth's Strange Situation was used to classify attachment patterns

11. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the Strange Situation in classifying attachment patterns

12. Explain the relationship between the quality of early infant-mother attachment and later attachment

13. Identify the factors that affect the development of attachment

14. Summarize the concept of reciprocity in the development of attachment in relation to parents and other caregivers

B. The self and social understanding

1. Describe the development of self-recognition in infancy

2. Explain the development of self-concept and self-esteem

3. Specify the role of child rearing practices, children's attributions and social experience on the development of self-concept and self-esteem.

4. Summarize the process of identity formation in adolescence

5. Identity the relationships among cognitive development, personal perception and the concept of other

6. Summarize Damon's stage sequence of the child's understanding of friendship

7. Identify the components of the problem-solving process

C. The development of morality and self-control

1. Describe the philosophical roots of the major theories of moral development

2. Evaluate the validity of the following major theories of moral development:

a. Psychoanalytic

b. Behaviorist

c. Sociobiological

d. Cognitive

3. Discuss the relationship between moral reasoning and moral behavior and explain the role of situational factors

4. Trace the development of self-control from late infancy into the middle childhood years

D. Development of gender differences and gender roles

1. List and describe the major perspectives on the development of gender-role identity

2. Trace the development of gender-role identity from early childhood through adolescence

3. List the factors that influence the differences between males and females and identify the research findings that support their positions

4. Differentiate among masculine, feminine and androgynous gender-role identities and identify the psychological adjustment for each of these roles

5. Explain the reasons that culture-specific gender stereotypes are self-perpetuating

6. Take a position on the issue of whether gender stereotypes and traditional gender roles are grounded in biological differences between the sexes or occur as a result of environmental influences

VI. Contexts for Development

A. The family

1. Identify traditional family functions and describe how they changed with the advent of the Industrial Revolution

2. Describe the ecological approach to understanding the family system and critique this perspective

3. Identify and describe Baumrind's parenting styles and explain the outcomes of each style in regard to children's behavior and personality

4. Describe the following factors that influence parenting style and child development:

a. Family size

b. Maternal employment

c. Child maltreatment

d. Education level of the parents

e. Family SES

5. List and describe the various forms of child maltreatment

6. Identify risk factors for children and families with respect to child maltreatment

7. Discuss interventions that help prevent child maltreatment

B. Peers, school, media

1. Trace the development of peer sociability from infancy to adolescence

2. Explain the influence of situational factors on child-to-child interaction

3. Describe how peer acceptance is assessed

4. Identify the strategies used by children to encourage the development of satisfactory peer relations

5. Describe interventions to assist children in the development of satisfactory peer interactions

6. Summarize the various methods of classroom management and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each.

7. Explain the origin of differential treatment of students and describe the effects of such treatment

8. Summarize the effects of the attempts to desegregate schools

9. Describe the impact of the physical environment of school of social and academic outcomes for students

10. Describe the role of computers, television and other technologies upon the classroom learning experience

11. Explain how children with special needs are identified and evaluated and describe intervention strategies used to promote optimal cognitive and social development

12. Summarize the information on the impact of television on the development of children's self-concept, self-esteem, gender identity and social skills

C. Child development and social policy

1. Explain the role of societal values, special interest groups and economic conditions in influencing child-related public policies

2. Describe local, state and federal policies and legislation that pertain to children

3. Summarize the impact of the United Nations on the status of children across the globe

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

60%    A minimum of four exams
20%    A comprehensive final exam
20%    A research paper/project requiring the use of several sources of information and demonstrating the student's understanding of developmental theories. The paper must be written in APA style.

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PSYC 215H

No information found.

PSYC 218

  • Title: Human Development*
  • Number: PSYC 218
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

Description:

This course is a comprehensive account of human psychological and physical development from conception through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and death. The course integrates genetic, biological, physiological and anthropological influences with the psychological process, and explores determinants of development from both hereditary and environmental perspectives. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Students who successfully complete the Human Development Psychology course should be able to do the following:

  1. Explain foundational concepts and terminology appropriate to developmental life span.
  2. Differentiate developmental theories and research methods
  3. Describe the social and emotional development throughout the lifespan.
  4. Summarize cognitive and neurological development throughout the lifespan.
  5. Examine the physical development throughout the lifespan.
  6. Analyze the processes of death and dying.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Lifespan Developmental Perspective

A. Research

1. Describe the scientific method.

2. Explain the various research methodologies in psychology and human development.

3. Describe and explain developmental research designs.

4. Discuss ethical issues in human development research.

B. Issues

1. Present the historical view of development from the 17th century to contemporary theorists.

2. Discuss theoretical issues in human development, including: Nature vs. Nurture, Continuity vs. Discontinuity, Active vs. Passive individual.

3. Explain the role of culture, society and ritual.

II. Conception, Prenatal Development and Birth

A. Biological Foundations

1. Describe the role of DNA, genes and gamete maturation.

2. Describe the process of conception.

3. Discuss genetic aberrations.

B. Prenatal Development

1. Explain the interaction between heredity and environment.

2. Describe the prenatal periods of the zygote, embryo and fetus.

3. Discuss teratology and hazards to prenatal health.

C. Birth

1. Describe the birth process.

2. Explain childbirth methods.

3. Discuss perinatal complications.

III. Infancy

A. Physical Development

1. List and describe newborn reflexes.

2. Discuss brain development.

3. Describe sensory and perceptual development.

4. Describe motor development.

B. Cognitive Development

1. Explain the mechanisms of learning.

2. Discuss information processing.

3. Present Piaget's sensorimotor period.

4. Describe language development.

C. Socio-Emotional Development

1. Explain Erikson's stage of trust vs. mistrust.

2. Discuss the family and relationships.

3. Describe emotional development.

4. Discuss temperament.

5. Explain the process of attachment.

IV. Early Childhood

A. Physical Development

1. Describe and explain body growth and changes.

2. Discuss nutrition.

3. Describe motor development.

B. Cognitive Development

1. Discuss information processing, including scripts and strategies.

2. Present Piaget's preoperational period.

3. Explain Vygotsky's dialectical approach.

4. Discuss early childhood education.

C. Socio-Emotional Development

1. Explain Erikson's stages of autonomy vs. shame/doubt and initiative vs. guilt.

2. Describe parenting styles and discipline.

3. Explain the role of expanding family relationships, including siblings and peers.

4. Discuss the role of play in development.

5. Describe the emerging sense of self.

6. Explain the process of gender identification.

7. Describe moral development.

V. Middle and Late Childhood

A. Physical Development

1. Describe body changes occurring during this period of development.

2. Discuss the role of exercise in physical development.

B. Cognitive Development

1. Describe the information processing model, including metacognition.

2. Present Piaget's concrete operational period.

3. Discuss the development of intelligence and its measurement.

4. Discuss the role of achievement and competence in development.

C. Socio-Emotional Development

1. Explain Erikson's stage of industry vs. inferiority.

2. Describe secular trends of families.

3. Describe peer relationships, including popularity and friendships.

4. Discuss the role of school in development.

5. Discuss the role of self-esteem in development.

6. Explain gender stereotypes and roles.

7. Describe moral development and altruism.

8. Discuss the role of technology and the media in development.

VI. Adolescence

A. Physical Development

1. Describe puberty.

2. Discuss the secular trend in puberty.

3. Explain gender differences in adolescence.

B. Cognitive Development

1. Present Piaget's period of formal operations.

2. Discuss social cognition in adolescence.

C. Socio-Emotional Development

1. Explain Erikson's stage of identity vs. confusion.

2. Describe the interaction of parents and teens.

3. Discuss the influence of peer relationships during adolescence.

4. Explain the process of identity development.

5. Discuss culture and rites of passage.

6. Discuss disorders commonly associated with adolescence, including eating disorders, drug abuse, teen pregnancy and suicide.

VII. Early Adulthood

A. Physical Development

1. Describe the peak and slowdown in physical performance.

2. Discuss the role of nutrition and exercise in health during this period.

3. Describe the process of addiction and recovery.

B. Cognitive Development

1. Discuss Schaie's stage of adult cognitive development.

C. Socio-Emotional Development

1. Explain Erikson's stage of intimacy vs. isolation.

2. Describe theories of career choice and development.

3. Discuss theories of attraction and mate selection.

4. Explain the development of intimacy.

5. Discuss factors affecting marriage and relationships.

6. Discuss the diversity of adult lifestyles, including divorce.

7. Explain the family life cycle and parenthood.

VIII. Middle Adulthood

A. Physical Development

1. Describe the physical changes occurring in middle adulthood.

2. Discuss factors influencing health during this period, including stress and illness.

B. Cognitive Development

1. Discuss the interaction of health and cognitive functioning.

C. Socio-Emotional Development

1. Explain Erikson's stage of generativity vs. stagnation.

2. Present the developmental tasks of middle adulthood.

3. Discuss career issues occurring during this period.

4. Describe intergenerational relationship issues.

IX. Later Adulthood

A. Physical Development

1. Discuss the myths and realities of aging.

2. Present the theories of biological aging.

3. Discuss health issues in later adulthood.

B. Cognitive Development

1. Describe research regarding intellectual functioning in later adulthood.

C. Socio-Emotional Development

1. Discuss issues surrounding work and retirement.

2. Describe the interaction between families and aging couples.

3. Describe ethnic and cultural perspectives of aging.

4. Discuss the process of adjustment to aging.

X. Death and Dying

A. Describe the process of death and dying.

1. Discuss secular trends and cultural influences affecting our views of death and dying.

2. Describe the process of bereavement.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Four tests that include definitional, conceptual and analytical
questions over course content.
2. A comprehensive final examination that pulls the course content together.
3. Completion of three directed assignments.
4. Completion of a term paper or service learning option.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Students are cautioned to carefully review the requirements of specific transfer programs to ensure that this course will be accepted for the particular school or program they wish to pursue.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PSYC 218H

No information found.

PSYC 220

  • Title: Social Psychology*
  • Number: PSYC 220
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

Description:

Social psychology is the study of social influence on behavior and cognition. Social psychology explores our relationships with others, our interdependency, and the mutual influence we have on one another. The course will cover concepts such as attitude formation, attitude change, prejudice, aggression, affiliation, obedience to authority, and conformity; special emphasis will be placed on fostering prosocial behavior and how our attitudes toward self and others are influenced by race, ethnicity, gender, age, religious beliefs, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and political beliefs. The course requires students to acquire a critical awareness of research methodology. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define social psychology; describe the major theories and research methodology used by social psychologists.
  2. Describe social cognition, the major attribution theories, the self-concept and how they explain our perceptions of others.
  3. Discuss how social roles affect attitudes, beliefs, and values; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; and attitude and behavior change.
  4. Discuss the different forms of aggression, how media and social norms influence aggression and violence, and methods to reduce unwanted aggression and violence in society.
  5. Discuss prosocial behavior, the cultural, personal and interpersonal factors that hinder and facilitate helping, and ways to promote prosocial behavior.
  6. Describe and evaluate the theoretical causes and effects of prejudice, including racism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, anti-Semitism, and ageism.
  7. Describe affiliation, attraction and close relationships with emphasis on the social and cultural influences that affect them.
  8. Describe groups, how they form, roles within a group, how group dynamics influence behavior, deindividuation, group polarization and groupthink.
  9. Discuss factors affecting conformity, compliance, and obedience to authority.
  10. Apply theories of social psychology to strategies for organizational and social change.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Social Psychology
   A. Define social psychology and explain the breadth and limits of the
field.
   B. Identify and describe the major theories used in social psychology.
   C. Identify and describe the major methods of research in social
psychology.
   D. Evaluate each of the major methods of research in social psychology
with regard to how well each provides a description and explanation of
human behavior.
   E. Discuss the ethical motivations of social psychology’s founders on
issues of gender, racial, and cultural prejudice shaped social
psychology’s roots.

II. The social self
    A. Define self-concept and discuss how it is formed.
    B. Describe how others affect the self-concept. 
    C. Discuss cultural, gender, and other social influences on the
self-concept.
    D. Define self-esteem and the influences that affect it.
    E. Describe gender and cultural differences in self-esteem.
    F. Discuss self-presentation theory and its applications.

III. Social Cognition and Attribution Theory
   A. Discuss how perceptions of others are formed.
   B. Define the fundamental attribution error.
   C. Discuss the various theories about how judgments of others are
developed.
   D. Describe how attribution biases, confirmation bias, the
self-fulfilling prophecy affect social perception.

IV. Attitudes, Attitude Change and Effects on Behavior
   A. Discuss how attitudes, beliefs, and values are formed.
   B. Describe and discuss the relationship between attitudes and
behavior.
   C. Identify the various approaches to changing attitudes.
   D. Discuss the processes involved in changing attitudes.
   E. Describe what factors makes communication persuasive.
   F. Discuss how the mass media influences attitudes and social norms on
important topics such as attitudes toward gender, ethnicity, crime and
socioeconomic status.
   G. Discuss self-persuasion including the role of cognitive dissonance.
   H. Discuss how insufficient justification and insufficient deterrence
affect attitudes.
   I. Discuss the self-perception theory of attitude formation and
substantiation.

V. Aggression
   A. Discuss how different forms of aggression are defined.
   B. Compare and contrast at least three theoretical perspectives on
aggression.
   C. Describe causes of aggression, including frustration-aggression,
negative emotions, cognitive processes, physiological arousal,
temperament, and the influence of alcohol.
   D. Discuss intimate violence (e.g., violence against women, children,
and the elderly in terms of predictors, the cycle of violence, and the
likely effects).
   E. Discuss and evaluate methods to reduce unwanted aggression and
violence in society.

VI. Prejudice and Discrimination
   A. Define stereotypes and how they form.
   B. Discuss how stereotypes persist and how they can be changed.
   C. Define the types of prejudices (racism, sexism, heterosexism,
ableism, anti-Semitism, and ageism) and how they form.
   D. Discuss intergroup conflict including ingroup and outgroup
influence, the role of social identity, and implicit and explicit
prejudice.
   E. Describe gender stereotypes and how they form.
   F. Discuss cultural and media influences on sexism.
   G. Discuss hostile sexism, benevolent sexism and ambivalent sexism.
   H. Define racism including blatant, implicit and antiracism.
   I. Understand interracial interactions from all perspectives.
   J. Describe stereotype threat and its effects on learning and
achievement.
   K. Define discrimination, in its various forms, and the effects of
discrimination.
   L.  Discuss the effects of prejudice and discrimination from the
perspective of victims of prejudice and discrimination.
   M. Discuss historic and current views on discrimination and conflict
resolution, including contact theory, the jigsaw classroom,
decategorization and recategorization, and cultural change.

VII. Group Processes
   A. Discuss the processes underlying group formation and functions.
   B. Discuss how the size of a group affects group decision-making.
   C. Define and discuss social facilitation, social loafing and
deindividuation.
   D. Understand groupthink, group polarization, and brainstorming.
   E. Discuss social dilemmas and ethical considerations.
   F. Understand cultural influences on competition and conflict.
   G. Discuss conflict, conflict escalation and conflict reduction.

VIII. Conformity and Obedience to Authority
   A. Define conformity, compliance and obedience.
   B. Describe the early research examining conformity and dissent.
   C. Discuss majority and minority influence.
   D. Consider the cultural differences in conformity.
   E. Describe the roles of language, reciprocity, and important
strategies used to gain compliance. 
   F. Discuss resistance to compliance techniques.
   G. Discuss obedience and defiance. 
   H. Describe how Milgram's studies increased understanding of factors
that facilitate and mitigate obedience.
   
IX. Prosocial Behavior
   A.  Describe current theories of prosocial behavior including the
evolutionary perspective and motive-oriented explanations--rewards,
altruism and egoism.
   B. Discuss individual and social factors that promote and deter
prosocial behavior.
   C. Discuss the altruistic personality.
   D. Discuss gender and cultural differences in helping behavior.

X. Attraction 
   A. List the factors that predict liking, loving, and interpersonal
attraction.
   B. Describe the processes of liking, loving, and interpersonal
attraction.
   C. Define the evolutionary psychological explanation for mate
selection.
   D. Describe cultural differences in mate selection.
   E. Understand the theories of formation and retention of close
relationships including social exchange theory, equity theory, and
attachment theory.
   F. Describe factors affecting marriage, relationship conflict, and
divorce.

XI. Social Change
   A. Describe how societal and institutional attitudes change.
   B. Describe how new attitudes and behaviors are adopted and dispersed
throughout a society. 
   C. Apply the concepts of social psychology to the identification and
solution of a current social problem or issue.   
   D. List three strategies used to implement change and describe how
those strategies assist individuals in changing their attitudes and
behavior.

XII. Organizational Life
   A. Identify and describe various forms of group communication networks
and list the advantages and disadvantages of each.
   B. Identify and describe the process of group problem-solving and
decision-making.
   C. Understand the problems that follow commitment, entrapment and
escalation in organizational decision making.    
   D. Identify the characteristics of effective leaders and leadership.
   E. Understand the traditional leader and current models of leadership.
   F. Discuss leadership among women and non-white males.
   G. Discuss issues of racism and sexual harassment in the workplace.
   H. Discuss how the diversity of an organization enhances the prosperity
of the organization.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

      A minimum of three examinations                40-50% of grade
      A research paper or project                    10-20% of grade
      One or more individual student assignments     10-20% of grade
      One or more group assignments                  10-20% of grade
      Various individual instructor requirements     10-20% of grade
      Total                                          100%      

Grading Scale:

   A = 90% - 100% 
   B = 80% -  89% 
   C = 70% -  79%
   D = 60% -  69%
   F =  0% -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PSYC 220H

No information found.

PSYC 221

  • Title: Environmental Psychology*
  • Number: PSYC 221
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PSYC 130 or ITMD 121 or BIOL 130.

Description:

Environmental psychology will allow students to explore the relationship between the environment and human behavior. The premise of the course is that the social setting, environmental setting, and individual behavior are interrelated. The focus will be on (1) our relationships with the human built environment, (2) our relationships with the natural environment, (3) how humans adapt to changing environments, and (4) how we can coordinate our behavior to achieve sustainable relationships with our environment. The content of the course will appeal to individuals interested in urban planning, architecture, interior design, ecological sustainability, and community physical and psychological well-being. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define and describe environmental psychology.
  2. Describe environmental perception and cognition, including cognitive mapping.
  3. Describe how people think about and appraise environmental stressors, particularly natural or technological disasters.
  4. Explain the cognitive, behavioral, and emotional effects of weather, climate, and pollution on behavior.
  5. Explain the interrelationship between the physical setting and the social setting, personal space, and territoriality.
  6. Explain the effects of building design on behavior, social interaction, and mood.
  7. Describe factors that contribute to habitability, sense of place, and the effects of living in a city.
  8. Describe and discuss the relationship between the environment and our well-being.
  9. Apply theories of behavior change to the concept of sustainability and how behavior is related to sustainability.
  10. Explain how new technologies are successfully distributed and adopted in a population. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

  I. The Definition, History, and Methods of Environmental Psychology
     A. Define environmental psychology.
     B. Appraise the value of studying environmental psychology.
     C. Describe the history and content areas of environmental
psychology.   
     D. Explain what it means to study psychology from an ecological
perspective.
     E. Describe the research methods of environmental psychology.
        1. Define a correlational study.
        2. Describe the features of experimental research.
        3. Identify the types of descriptive research.

 II. Theories of Environmental Psychology
     A. Describe how environmental perception and cognition function.
        1. Define environmental perception.
        2. Describe Kaplan’s preference matrix.
        3. Define holistic analysis.
        4. Discuss the transactional approach.
        5. Explain how Gestalt principles are applied to environmental
perception.
           a. Give examples of emergent properties.
           b. Define Prägnanz.
        6. Fully diagram the Brunswik’s lens model.
        7. Explain Gibson’s ecological perception.
            a. Define affordances and discuss their cognitive function.
            b. Describe how humans find and/or create ecological niches.
        8. Explain cognitive maps and wayfinding.
     B. Describe the environmental load approach.
     C. Describe how the environmental stress approach is used.
            a. List the major types of environmental stressors. 
            b. Explain the factors involved in the appraisal of
stressors.
     D. Describe the cognitive-behavioral approach.
     E. Explain the biological influences on our relationship with the
environment.
        1. Define biophobia.
        2. Define biophilia.
        3. Evaluate the evolutionary perspective on our relationship with
the environment.

III. The Natural Environment
     A. Explain the effects of weather and climate on behavior.
        1. Evaluate the current views on the climate-behavior
relationship.
        2. Describe the effects of temperature on social behavior.
        3. Describe the effects of extreme temperatures on cognition.
    B. Explain how the theory of ecopsychology explains the human
relationship with nature.
        1. List what humans regard as attractive in natural settings.
        2. Describe how humans use natural settings to meet their
psycho-social needs.

IV. Pollution, Disasters, and Toxic Hazards
    A. Explain the effects of noise on behavior.
       1. Describe the effect of noise on performance.
       2. Explain the effect of noise on stress.
       3. Describe the effect of noise on social behavior.
    B. Describe the effects of air and water pollution.
       1. Explain how air pollution effect social behavior.
       2. Explain the effect of air pollution on performance.
       3. Explain how water pollution impacts our psychological and social
functioning.
    C. Describe how we think about natural disasters.
       1. List the factors humans consider when assessing risk of
disaster.
       2. Tell how humans cope with living in disaster prone areas.
       3. Describe the psychological effects of experiencing a natural
disaster.
    D. Explain how we interpret risk of technological disasters.

V. The Human Built Environment
   A. Describe the concepts of personal space and territoriality.
      1. Describe the determinants of individual differences of personal
space needs.
      2. Explain interpersonal positioning effects.
      3. Describe the relationship between territoriality and aggression.
    B. Describe the effects of population density and crowding.
       1. Explain how population density affects social behavior.
       2. Explain the theoretical explanations of crowding on
physiological-cognitive arousal.
       3. Describe the various means by which we cope with crowding.
    C. Explain how architecture and design affect cognition and behavior.
       1. Explain the effects of illumination on mood and social
interaction. 
       2. Describe the effects of windows and natural light on mood.
       3. Explain how room/building design can facilitate or inhibit
social relations.
       4. Define the concept of design alternative and the sense of
control over the environment.
       5. Explain the difference between architectural determinism and
possibilism.
       6. Explain the cognitive affect of the design elements commodity,
firmness and delight. 
    D. Illustrate how living and work spaces can be improved.
       1. Define place attachment and discuss the cognitive affect of
place attachment.
       2. List the factors contributing to habitability.
    E.  Describe how urban, suburban, and rural living affect cognition
and behavior.
        1. Explain why people tend to prefer suburban living.
        2. Describe how rural and urban dwellers differ on their view of
the natural environment.
        3. Interpret the differences in social and helping behaviors
between urban and rural dwellers.
 
VI. The Environment and Well-Being
    A. Explain the importance of leisure space.
       1. Explain the attributes of high quality leisure spaces.
       2. Define and discuss “sense of place.”
       3. Identify the challenges of maintaining high quality leisure
spaces.
       4. Explain the value of “small urban places” to social life.
    B. Describe the relationship between the built environment and
physical well-being. 
       1. Explain how environmental and social elements in a city predict
obesity.
       2. Define environmental illnesses such as the sick building
syndrome.
       3. Explain the relationship between hospital design and patient
recovery.
    C. Explain the relationship between the environment and psychological
well-being.
       1. Describe how the physical environment can invite social
relatedness.
       2. Explain how stress and coping with environmental illnesses
affect mental health.
       3. Describe the restorative qualities quality environments on
well-being.
 
VII. Conservation and Behavior
    A. Explain the dilemma of the commons.
    B. Evaluate the importance of recycling, water conservation, and
conserving energy. 
    C. Describe the predictors of pro-environmental behavior.
       1. Explain the relationship between attitudes and behavior.
       2. Evaluate the methods used to change behavior toward favoring the
environment.
          a. Give examples of how theories of behavior change have been
put to use.
          b. Describe the elements of successful behavior change
programs.
       3. Describe how barriers to change can be overcome.
 
VIII. Environmental Attitudes, Social Norms, and Memes
    A. Describe what is meant by a “culture of consumerism.”
       1. Evaluate the positive and negative outcomes of consumerism.
       2. Define and discuss the concept of sustainability.
    B. Describe the relationship between socio-economic factors and
environmentalism.
    C. Describe how new technologies are adopted and innovation
dispersed.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Three to four exams should be given throughout the semester. The
exams should cover key concepts, theories, and examples of applied
environmental psychology. The exams can be of any configuration, such as
multiple-choice, essay, or short answer. 

2. Two to four assignments should be completed throughout the semester
during class meeting times. The assignments should allow students to
observe examples of phenomena covered in class on the JCCC campus. Through
these assignments, students should demonstrate their comprehension of
course material.
 
3. One to four projects should be assigned during the semester to be
completed outside of class. The projects can be reflection papers,
research papers, group projects, or other homework exercises. The projects
should allow students of demonstrate their ability to apply, understand,
and reflect upon course material.

Three to four exams  - 30-50%
Two to four during class activities - 10-25%
One to four projects - 10-25%
Comprehensive Final - 10-30%
Total - 100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 -100% 
B = 80% - 89% 
C = 70% - 79% 
D = 60% - 69% 
F = under 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PSYC 225

  • Title: Educational Psychology*
  • Number: PSYC 225
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

Description:

This course addresses issues that apply theories of psychology to the educational environment. Topics included in the study of educational psychology include research methodology, theories of human development, principles of learning, the psychology of motivation, theories of intelligence, testing and assessment techniques, and career development. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and apply principles and methods drawn from the behavioral sciences to the processes of teaching and learning.
  2. List and describe the skills expected of students at various academic levels.
  3. Identify conditions under which positive educational change takes place.
  4. Describe the techniques of teaching that promote more efficient learning.
  5. Identify and describe the various forms of educational measurement and evaluation.
  6. Apply the results of student evaluation to determine the effectiveness of teaching.
  7. Define intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and discuss the role of each in teaching and learning.
  8. Identify the group dynamics in a classroom situation and discuss ways in which such dynamics enhance or impede learning.
  9. List the various categories of exceptionality that students present in educational settings.
  10. Describe the characteristics of children with exceptionalities.
  11. Compare and contrast children with exceptionalities and their peers without exceptionalities.
  12. Discuss the various research methods used to study the process of teaching and learning.
  13. Apply the results of research in educational psychology to promote more effective teaching procedures that will support student success.
  14. Evaluate the various methods of classroom management and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each.
  15. Identify and discuss alternative and controversial issues in education.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Research Methods in Educational Psychology
   A. List the various methods by which psychologists and educators study
teaching and learning.
   B. Select at least two research methods and utilize those methods to
propose a study on an educational issue or problem.

II. Human Development
   A. Cognitive Development
      1. Identify the major theories that seek to describe cognitive
development in children and youth.
      2. Compare the traditional theories on cognitive development with
the more recent theories advanced in this area.
      3. Trace the cognitive development of children and adolescents using
two different theoretical perspectives.
      4. List the cognitive skills expected of children in pre-school,
early elementary, mid-elementary, middle school and high school.
   B. Language Development
      1. Trace the development of language abilities in children.
      2. Identify the various components of language that children must
master.
      3. Differentiate between speech and language and describe what is
involved in both processes.
      4. Compare and contrast the nature and nurture explanations of
language acquisition.
      5. Discuss the link between language and thinking.
   C. Social and Emotional Development
      1. Discuss the major theories of social-emotional development in
children and adolescents.
      2. Describe how the major theories of social-emotional development
contribute to an understanding of the student in the classroom.
      3. Apply the relevant research in social-emotional development to
specific classroom issues.
      4. Explain Erik Erikson's psychosocial theory and its application to
teaching and learning.
      5. Discuss Kohlberg's theory of moral development and its impact on
the individual student and the classroom as a whole.

III. Learning Theory
   A. Classical Conditioning
      1. Describe the scientist and the experiments that led to the theory
of classical conditioning.
      2. List and define the various terms used in explaining classical
conditioning.
      3. Describe the process of classical conditioning and explain how
learning takes place according to this theory.
      4. Identify applications of classical conditioning in the
classroom.
   B. Operant Conditioning
      1. Describe the scientist and the experiments that illustrate
operant conditioning.
      2. List and define the various terms involved in operant
conditioning.
      3. Describe the process of operant conditioning and explain how
learning takes place according to this theory.
      4. Identify applications of operant conditioning in the classroom.
   C. Social Learning Theory
      1. Describe the scientist and the experiments that illustrate social
learning theory.
      2. List and define the various terms used in explaining social
learning theory.
      3. Describe the process of social learning theory and explain how
learning takes place according to this theory.
      4. Identify applications of social learning theory in the
classroom.
   D. Cognitive Learning Theories
      1. Piaget
         a. Summarize Piaget's theory of cognitive development.
         b. Identify and explain the terms in Piaget's theory.
         c. Trace cognitive development through Piaget's four stages.
         d. Identify applications of Piaget's theory in the classroom.
      2. Vygotsky
         a. Describe Vygotsky's theory of cognitive development.
         b. Identify and explain the terms in Vygotsky's theory.
         c. Summarize Vygotsky's view of the development of private
speech.
         d. Identify applications of Vygotsky's theory in the classroom.
         e. Compare and contrast Piagetian and Vygotskian theories of
cognitive development.
         f. List the strengths and weaknesses of Piagetian and Vygotskian
theories of cognitive development.
      3. Information Processing Theories
         a. Summarize the information processing theory of cognitive
development.
         b. Identify and explain the terms in information processing
theory.
         c. Explain how information processing theories of cognitive
development differ from Piagetian and Vygotskian theories of cognitive
development.
         d. List the strengths and weaknesses of the information
processing theory of cognitive development.

IV. Motivation
   A. Identify the various theories of motivation.
   B. Distinguish between extrinsic and intrinsic motivation and describe
conditions which encourage or discourage their development.
   C. Explain the concept of achievement motivation and discuss its
origins.
   D. Explain the role of attributions in fostering or diminishing
achievement motivation.

V. Intelligence
   A. Trace the history of the intelligence assessment movement.
   B. Define intelligence according to the traditional theories as well as
more recent theoretical approaches.
   C. Identify the procedures involved in assessing intelligence.
   D. Describe the link between creativity and intelligence.
E. Identify and discuss the major controversial issues in the definition
and measurement of intelligence.

VI. Assessment and Testing
   A. Differentiate measurement and evaluation.
   B. Define formative and summative evaluation and describe the uses of
each type of evaluation.
   C. Explain the difference between norm-referenced measures and
curriculum-based measures and describe the strengths and weaknesses of
each.
   D. Identify and explain measures of central tendency and measure of
variability and discuss what such information reveals about the individual
student as well as the group.
   E. Define and explain reliability and validity and analyze the
importance of each to test construction.
   F. Apply measurement concepts to explain a sample of student data.

VII. Contemporary Issues in Educational Psychology
   A. Identify the major areas of controversy in education.
   B. Evaluate the various perspectives on the controversial issues in
education.
   C. Develop a frame of reference for discussing important issues in
education based on examining one's individual belief system.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

      A minimum of four examinations               50%of grade
      20 hours of structured observation in an 
         educational setting with written reports  25%of grade
      One or more individual student assignments    5%of grade
      One or more group assignments                 5%of grade
      Various individual instructor assignments    15%of grade
         Total                                    100%

All exams, assignments and projects will measure the attainment of the
competencies outlined above.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PSYC 250

  • Title: Health Psychology*
  • Number: PSYC 250
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PSYC 130.

Description:

This course covers content, methods and theory regarding the interplay between psychological and biological determinants of health and illness and examines how these factors relate to health status. The course focus is on the application of psychological methods, principles of maintenance of health, prevention of disease, treatment of illness, and rehabilitation and recovery from impaired health. It follows an interdisciplinary approach to content and instruction. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Study the historical context of the field of health psychology and the psychological and medical contexts in which it fits.
  2. Describe concepts of health and illness as they relate to recognizing causes and symptoms of illness (cultural forces).
  3. Review and learn to apply basic measurement procedures of health and illness.
  4. Name the special contributions that psychologists make to the study of health and illness.
  5. Define health and be able to specify differences between a healthy and unhealthy person.
  6. Name measurement techniques to differentiate between well and healthy people.
  7. Identify the forces in the individual, the group and the larger social system that may affect health/illness.
  8. Be knowledgeable regarding the interdisciplinary nature of health psychology.
  9. Name the major causes of illness such as 1) S-R reactions, 2) cognitive mediation processes, 3) stimuli outside the person which may be controllable (i.e., noise, environmental pollution, etc.), or habitual behavior.
  10. Compare and contrast different ways of thinking about health and illness, (e.g., formalistic cause/effect, mechanistic and contextual thinking).
  11. Describe the history and current status of the mind-body debate.
  12. Describe human anatomical and physiological aspects of the human body necessary to understand the biological effects of stressors on the body.
  13. Differentiate and identify various levels of the nervous system and their relationship to health/illness.
  14. Describe the history and demographic characteristics of illness in the U.S.
  15. Conceptualize descriptive statistical methods used to describe data and understand inferential statistics as they apply to studies done in the field.
  16. Describe health care, identify care providers in the U.S., and compare them with other countries.
  17. Describe systems developed to pay for health care.
  18. Define stress.
  19. Describe the interactive forces involved between stress and illness.
  20. Describe coping methods used to combat stress.
  21. Evaluate various stress measures.
  22. Name the goals of consumer health education.
  23. Describe health education programs in place.
  24. Describe the workplace as a source of stress, and explain how stressors play a part at work.
  25. Describe the evolution of health care in the workplace and the reasons for change.
  26. Name the life-style risk factors and explain why each procedure is a health hazard.
  27. Describe the positive life-style factors, explain why they are recommended and for what they are recommended.
  28. Name the negative health effects of cigarette smoking.
  29. Demonstrate an understanding of the statistical data that supports a link between cigarette smoking and related illnesses.
  30. Name and compare various psychological techniques for understanding and controlling smoking behavior.
  31. Contrast sickness and disease. Describe the psychological effects of illness.
  32. Describe the interrelationships among health-oriented behaviors (Will a person who visits a physician frequently be the same person who fastens his seat belt, etc.).
  33. Describe the health care system and psychological techniques that could be used to improve it.
  34. Name the sources of stress brought about by the health care system.
  35. Compare and contrast the various hypothesized causes of psychosomatic illnesses.
  36. Describe the placebo effect and its effect upon health care.
  37. Describe treatment programs available for reducing stress.
  38. Describe the health care problems associated with chronic pain.
  39. Name and compare the various kinds of pain.
  40. Describe and contrast the various theories that explain pain.
  41. Explain how measurement of subjective experience such as pain is accomplished.
  42. Describe psychological and psychosocial approaches used in reducing chronic pain.
  43. Describe the epidemiological characteristics of cardiovascular disease.
  44. Describe and critically evaluate the Framingham study. Explain how personality is seen as a factor in heart disease.
  45. Describe prevention techniques to reduce cardiovascular disease.
  46. Describe rehabilitation techniques for chronic heart disease.
  47. Describe how cancer and asthma may be prevented and treated.
  48. Describe the data and problems associated with adherence to medical treatment programs.
  49. Describe the general characteristics of health care providers of different types.
  50. Describe how characteristics of the health care provider may enhance or interfere with the health delivery system.
  51. Name alternative ways a knowledge of health psychology can benefit the general population.
  52. Discuss future evolution of the field of health psychology. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The History of the Health Movements
   A. Describe history of the study of disease and health
   B. Identify present-day status of health movements
   C. Define terms within the health area
   D. Identify cross-cultural approaches to health

II. Methods of Study
   A. Review psychological methods in the study of disease
   B. Identify role of psychological factors in causation of disease
   C. Present psychological measures of health status
   D. Evaluate health measurement and evaluation in other cultures

III. Concepts and Methods of Epidemiology
   A. Review history
   B. Use statistical methods
   C. Describe descriptive versus analytical epidemiology

IV. Major Areas of Psychological Impact on Health
   A. Stress
      1. Review literature
      2. Identify psychological techniques in measurement
      3. Present psychological techniques in prevention
      4. Present psychological techniques in treatment
   B. Substance abuse
      1. Review literature
      2. Identify psychological techniques in measurement
      3. Present psychological techniques in prevention
      4. Present psychological techniques in treatment
   C. Chronic pain
      1. Review literature
      2. Identify psychological techniques in measurement
      3. Present psychological techniques in prevention
      4. Present psychological techniques in treatment
   D. Cardiovascular disease, cancer and asthma
      1. Review literature
      2. Identify psychological techniques in measurement
      3. Present psychological techniques in prevention
      4. Present psychological techniques in treatment

V. Mental Health Status Measures
   A. Identify and give examples of basic types of health status measures
      1. Activities of daily living
      2. Sickness impact scale
      3. MONSAQ
      4. Measures of quality of health care
   B. Explain role of psychologist in health areas
      1. Review relationship between mental health and prognosis
      2. Explore future of health psychology
      3. Discuss development of new areas

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

      Four major exams
      Comprehensive final examination
      Periodic quizzes

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PSYC 250H

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PSYC 291

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PSYC 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: PSYC 292
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness.

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of Psychology, not usually taught in the curriculum. This course may expand upon a topic introduced in a current course, synthesize topics that cut across existing courses, or explore a topic not currently addressed in the Psychology curriculum. Students may repeat Special Topics in Psychology for credit but only on different topics.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Be conversant with the relevant readings within the selected topic.
  2. Define and explain key terms and concepts within the selected topic.
  3. Demonstrate appropriate research methodology relevant to the selected topic.
  4. Relate the special topic to essential issues and themes in Psychology.
  5. Articulate a critically informed perspective on the selected topic drawn from qualitative and/or quantitative evidence.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Content Outline and Competencies will vary because they are dependent on the special topic being offered. The outline and competencies will follow the standard format for JCCC courses and will be written in outcomes-based language. The Special Topics course proposal will first be reviewed and approved by the Psychology faculty. The Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences Curriculum Committee and the Division Dean will review and approve each Special Topics course proposal.  Scheduling of Special Topics courses will be the responsibility of the Department Chair.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of evaluation will vary depending on the special topic being offered. Standard methods of evaluation may be employed, such as: readings, discussions, written assignments (short response through research papers), library or web-based research, individual or group projects, formal and informal presentations, and service learning. Other methods may be utilized to assess student mastery of competencies based upon the needs of the special topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Any specific Special Topics topic may not be repeated within a two-year sequence.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).