Architecture (ARCH)

Courses

ARCH 120   Introduction to Architecture (3 Hours)

This course is an introduction to the profession of architecture through a study of its history, vocabulary, theories and practices. The facets that make up the total architectural curriculum as well as the various professional roles that architects can be expected to perform will be covered. Architectural study is seen as both an art and a science. The interdisciplinary character of architectural practice is emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ARCH 123   Architectural Principles* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ARCH 120.

This course will elaborate on the concepts first presented in introduction to architecture. General focus will be on the modern profession and architects dealing with past, present and emerging ideas as they relate to physical and social context including landscaping, buildings and cities. Unifying themes will be presented of formal architectural principles in relation to modernism and the impact on design, the site, landscaping, and site planning issues. This course is only offered in the spring semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ARCH 127   Introduction to Architectural Graphics (4 Hours)

This course is designed to build a conceptual and manual foundation for professional architectural education. Students will learn to apply a variety of media and drawing systems such as freehand drawing, architectural lettering and equipment usage. Students will also learn applied geometry including line, tone, texture and utilizing sun, shade and shadows. Multi-view, paraline, axonometric and oblique drawings will be taught and students will build models related to architectural forms. Emphasis will be on learning to think in spatial terms while introducing professional, conceptual and visual vocabulary. Graphic presentation skills will be developed using standard graphic conventions, basic computer skills, and basic material investigations. This course is only offered in the fall semester. 8 hrs. integrated lecture, studio/wk.

ARCH 131   Architectural Graphics* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ARCH 127.

This course builds upon the conceptual and manual skills acquired in Introduction to Architectural Graphics. Students will expand their ability by learning to apply a variety of media and advanced drawing systems, such as design drawing techniques, model building, graphic diagramming, grid perspective drawing, projection perspective drawing, and shade and shadow studies. Emphasis will continue to be on learning to think in spatial terms as well as developing a new repertoire of graphic presentation skills. 6 hrs. integrated lecture, studio/wk. This course is only offered in the spring semester.

ARCH 140   Architectural Design* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ARCH 127.

This course introduces the student to the process and vocabulary of design. The purpose of the content is to develop the ability to solve two- and three-dimensional design problems with basic methods, vocabulary and media appropriate to the architectural profession. This course is only offered in the spring semester. 6 hrs. integrated lecture, studio/wk.

ARCH 210   Design History & Society (3 Hours)

The nature of design, even more than the traditional fine arts, responds to and is indeed inseparable from the culture and society in which it exists. This course provides a survey of design history from the nineteenth-century Industrial Revolution to the present, with emphasis on graphic and industrial design and art and architecture, examining the history of design as it corresponds to changes in economics, politics, technology, industrialization, and other societal factors. While focusing on the events and achievements in modern Western cultures there will be selected references to pre-industrial landmarks and developments and a global scope will be examined. Design will be studied as a social practice that contributes to the production, maintenance, and representation of culture and society. The course will focus less on aesthetics than on the cultural milieu in which designers have created images and objects that give physical form to intangible ideas. 3hrs. lecture/wk.

ARCH 220   Sustainability in the Built Environment (3 Hours)

This course examines evolving issues of sustainability as they pertain to the built environment. The course will cover a broad spectrum of issues, with attention focused on historical precedent, changing social matrices, technological advancements, political and regulatory consequences, and potential future transformations. Analysis of sustainability as a concept and societal goal will be considered throughout the course as we consider issues that are both local and global. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ARCH 244   Architectural History Before the Modern Era (3 Hours)

This course will acquaint students with the architecture and ideas of world civilizations from prehistory to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Emphasis is on architecture as an integrated element of the development of commercial, technological, and ideological transferences among different regions, nascent religious groups and evolving political enterprises. The course will consider architectural styles and cultures from around the globe. 3hrs. lecture/wk.

ARCH 245   Architectural History: Modern (3 Hours)

This course will investigate the architecture of the Modern Era. The focus of this course is on the principles of design, education of the architect, artistic forces and concepts of the built environment within its historical context. The work of prominent architects and their architectural theories will be covered and analyzed. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ARCH 245H   HON: Architectural History: Modern* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ARCH 250   Architectural Design Thinking* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ARCH 127 and ARCH 131 and ARCH 140.

This course will enrich concepts previously encountered in architecture studio courses and explore new methodologies that apply to design thinking processes. Students will encounter ill-structured, undefined design problems and learn to analyze and determine numerous ways to evaluate and illustrate the outcomes in multiple design solutions. Collaboration is encouraged between individuals and group participants using various processes to interpret, develop and visually construct final solutions to projects using computer-based design applications, free-hand drawing techniques and three-dimensional model making capabilities. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

ARCH 292   Special Topics: (1-3 Hour)

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to diverse areas of architecture not usually taught in the curriculum to interested and qualified students within the program.

ARCH 120

  • Title: Introduction to Architecture
  • Number: ARCH 120
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is an introduction to the profession of architecture through a study of its history, vocabulary, theories and practices. The facets that make up the total architectural curriculum as well as the various professional roles that architects can be expected to perform will be covered. Architectural study is seen as both an art and a science. The interdisciplinary character of architectural practice is emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the process by which the individual is educated to be a licensed professional architect, landscape architect, interior architect or urban planner.
  2. Demonstrate an aesthetic vocabulary as used by architects that describes the built and natural environment.
  3. Define the major historical periods of architecture, to include what characterizes each period, from pre-history to the 20th century.
  4. Define the concepts which shape the nature of design such as anthropometrics, ergometrics and social behavior.
  5. List the concepts and vocabulary that define the technology of architecture such as structural systems and environmental control.
  6. Define the issues and means to design for energy conservation.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of the role each discipline plays, to include architects, landscape architects, interior architects, urban designers and planners as they execute their work in planning or designing the built environment.
  8. Demonstrate an appreciation of issues involved in the preservation of the built and natural environment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Architecture
   A. Define architecture.
   B. List and describe the basic elements of architecture, including
point, line, plane and volume.
   C. Describe the relationship between architecture and aesthetics.

II. Architectural Education
   A. List architectural program types, including the typical curriculum
of each.
   B. Describe the academic rigors of architectural school, including the
jury system, typical workload and differences from traditional college
education.
   C. Describe the apprenticeship, its demands and values.
   D. Describe intern-development programs and their state requirements.
   E. Describe the process of acquiring an architectural license.
   F. Contrast the advantages and disadvantages of an architectural
career.

III. Design Concepts
   A. Define each of the following concepts:
       1. Synthesis
       2. Organization
       3. Order/Hierarchy
       4. Dominance-exarsis-punctuation
       5. Imagability
       6. legibility
       7. Identity
       8. Diversity
       9. Scale
      10. Proportion
      11. Rhythm
      12. Unity
      13. Meaning
      14. Intention
      15. Morality
   B. Identify examples of the preceding concepts.

IV. History of Architecture
   A. Describe the architectural elements common to early cultures,
including examples of each.
   B. Describe the architectural design contributions of classical
antiquity - Greece and Rome
   C. Describe the transitional architectural styles of the Middle Ages,
including Byzantine, Moslem, Carolingian, Romanesque, and Gothic.
   D. Describe the principal design features of Renaissance architecture,
including notable examples.
   E. Trace architectural developments through the 18th and 19th centuries
- both European and American.
   F. List and describe the work of major modern architects, including Le
Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, Gropius and the Bauhaus, and Mies van der
Rohe.
   G. Evaluate the status of contemporary architecture.

V. Human Dynamics and Architecture
   A. List behavioral issues affecting architectural design of space.
   B. Describe the behavioral theory of space, Sommer’s theory of
territoriality, Bechtel’s theory and the empirical approach.
   C. Determine environmental comfort and control for lighting, heating,
cooling, and air transfer.
   D. Determine communications and data requirements of spaces.

VI. The Technology of Architecture
   A. Select the appropriate structural system to accommodate stresses and
seismic activity.
   B. Describe the design requirements for energy conservation.
   C. Describe the significance of materials to the space and the
environment.

VII. The Economics of Architectural Space
   A. Contrast the tangible versus the intangible components of space.
   B. Describe spheres of architectural aesthetics.
   C. Describe the theory of space, including the roles of form, plane,
linear elements and openings.
   D. Describe great enclosures, their influences, psychological effects,
and structural characteristics.

VIII. Introduction to Allied Disciplines
   A. Describe the history of landscape architecture and describe its
current role.
   B. Describe the elements of interior design and the evolution of
interior space.
   C. Describe contemporary aesthetics of interior space.

IX. Urban Architecture
   A. Briefly describe the history of urban design.
   B. List the elements of successful urban design.
   C. Describe the components of urban design planning.
   D. Trace a comprehensive planning process.
   E. Describe the relationship of regionalism to architectural design.

X. Historic Preservation and Related Environmental Interventions
   A. List and describe the elements of preservation, conservation and
restoration.
   B. Evaluate old buildings as an expression of human spirit and
historical roots.
   C. Compare the fitness of old buildings as opposed to the performance
of new constructions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Proposed ranges for ARCH 120:
Attendance/class participation   10-20%
Quizzes and Examinations         30-50%
Research and Projects            30-50%
                                 100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARCH 123

  • Title: Architectural Principles*
  • Number: ARCH 123
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ARCH 120.

Description:

This course will elaborate on the concepts first presented in introduction to architecture. General focus will be on the modern profession and architects dealing with past, present and emerging ideas as they relate to physical and social context including landscaping, buildings and cities. Unifying themes will be presented of formal architectural principles in relation to modernism and the impact on design, the site, landscaping, and site planning issues. This course is only offered in the spring semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the modernist movement of architecture as it relates to current trends of the built environment.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of present influences that affect the modern architectural profession.
  3. Define formal architectural principles used in modern design.
  4. Recognize issues that impact the design, site and site planning parameters.
  5. List vocabulary used in modern architectural concepts and practice.
  6. Describe the relationship of historical references and their use as current trends in architecture.
  7. Discuss past cultural influences on design and the relationship to modern social context in landscaping, buildings, and site planning issues.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Architectural Principles
   A. Define modernism.
      1. Define elements of architecture
      2. Describe relationship of modern architecture to the built
environment.
   B. Define and list modern architecture.
   C. Define and list modern architects.

II. Ideas of Modernism
   A. Establish ideas and concepts of modernism.
   B. Define past, present and emerging ideas.
   C. Describe relationships of ideas to the physical environment.
   D. Compare relationships of the physical environment to social
context.

III. Relationship of Design
   A. Define aspects of the built environment.
   B. Establish modern parameters for landscaping, including the site and
site planning, buildings and cities, and urban planning.
   C. Compare and apply aspects of urban planning to the built and social
environment.

IV. Principles of Modernism
   A. Define formal architectural principles.
   B. Compare and relate formal architectural principles to modernism.
   C. Develop relationships between the principles of modernism and their
impact on design, the site, and site planning.

V. Planning Principles
   A. Define urban planning principles of modern design theories.
   B. Describe modern landscape and planning issues of the physical
environment.
   C. Compare and contrast landscape and planning designs of early
modernism to late period design.

VI. Modern Architecture
   A. Describe modern architectural elements.
   B. Define relationships of historic architecture to modern design.
   C. List current trends.
   D. Determine present issues and influences.

VII. Modern Architects
   A. Research and identify modernist architects.
   B. Research and identify modernist works of architecture.
   C. Compare current architects and projects to modernist principles.

VIII. Impact of Technology
   A. Define technology in architecture.
   B. List means and methods of established technological trends.
   C. Identify new trends in technology and modernism.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class Participation   20-30% of grade
Examinations          20-30% of grade
Research Projects     20-30% of grade
Design Projects       20-30% of grade
  Total                100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%    
  B = 80 –  89%  
  C = 70 –  79%  
  D = 60 -  69%  
  F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARCH 127

  • Title: Introduction to Architectural Graphics
  • Number: ARCH 127
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 8
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 8

Description:

This course is designed to build a conceptual and manual foundation for professional architectural education. Students will learn to apply a variety of media and drawing systems such as freehand drawing, architectural lettering and equipment usage. Students will also learn applied geometry including line, tone, texture and utilizing sun, shade and shadows. Multi-view, paraline, axonometric and oblique drawings will be taught and students will build models related to architectural forms. Emphasis will be on learning to think in spatial terms while introducing professional, conceptual and visual vocabulary. Graphic presentation skills will be developed using standard graphic conventions, basic computer skills, and basic material investigations. This course is only offered in the fall semester. 8 hrs. integrated lecture, studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate freehand perspective drawing skills so as to represent a range of built and natural environment subjects at a variety of scales.
  2. Use the vocabulary of terms and concepts related to graphic communication skills.
  3. Letter in freehand appropriate letter forms that support design communication.
  4. Use drawing instruments to produce legible, clean and accurate drawings.
  5. Describe the types, characteristics, materials and methods of construction used in three-dimensional architectural models.
  6. Demonstrate the conceptual and manual skills required to construct multi-view drawings of three-dimensional subjects through orthographic projection methods.
  7. Demonstrate the conceptual and manual skills required to construct paraline, axonometric and oblique drawings of three-dimensional subjects through the use of single-view and projection methods.
  8. Cast shades and shadows in paraline, multi-view and freehand perspective drawings.
  9. Perceive and prioritize spatial relationships of environmental subjects at a variety of scales.
  10. Demonstrate professional application techniques for a variety of media.
  11. Describe the criteria for selecting media appropriate to the communication task.
  12. Define and illustrate the graphic vocabulary of line weights, tones and textures which will describe the components and properties of three-dimensional subjects.
  13. Define and describe the essential terms, concepts and systems used to observe and describe color.
  14. Demonstrate a process for gathering and organizing research from a variety of credible sources and synthesizing it into a research essay.
  15. Demonstrate the application of the architectural profession’s conceptual and visual vocabulary.
  16. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio.
  17. Describe professional usage of basic computer media applications and how it relates to graphic representations.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Freehand Drawing: Recording the Built and Natural Environment
   A. Observe, organize and communicate spatial relationships.
   B. Control line weights and tonal value to define space and emphasis.
   C. Use freehand perspective techniques to communicate scale and
proportion.
   D. Create variety and heighten realism or establish emphasis through
tone, texture and color.
   E. Record the environment with different media.
   F. Shade and shadow to communicate spatial relationships.
   G. Sketch subject matter quickly.

II. Architectural Lettering
   A. Construct the basic block letter form.
   B. Construct the lowercase letter form.
   C. Construct the large outline letters, to include appropriate
applications.
   D. Control the line quality, consistency, balance and proportion of the
letter form.
   E. Control the spacing between letter forms and words.
   F. Select lettering style, scale, and layout based on the purpose of
communication.

III. Professional Media and Equipment Usage
   A. Use and care for basic instrument-aided drawing tools.
   B. Use equipment to control basic line quality, weight and precision.
   C. Read and translate architectural/ engineering scales.
   D. Draw on different professional media.
   E. Describe basic computer software applications of the profession.

IV. Applied Geometry
   A. Describe the elementary principles of applied geometry.
   B. Use applied geometry in instrument-aided drawing to increase control
and precision.
   C. Describe and apply proportioning systems.

V. Line, Tone, Texture and Color
   A. Describe the concept and function of line weights for visual
communication.
   B. Describe methods for constructing a vocabulary of lines from
different media.
   C. See and define an edge, or contour, through line.
   D. See and define surface planes and volume through the construction of
a scale of value (light/dark) changes.
   E. Observe and render texture appropriate to environmental graphics.
   F. Define the elements of color:  hue, value, and chroma.
   G. Organize color by models.
   H. Apply color principles and harmonies through color media.

VI. Model Building
   A. Describe the types and characteristics of three-dimensional models.
   B. Describe the materials, tools and techniques used in model
construction.
   C. Describe the relationship between two-dimensional drawing and
three-dimensional form generation.
   D. Illustrate fundamental construction techniques, including cutting,
sanding, joining.
   E. Document the finished models through the photographic medium.

VII. Multi-View Drawing
   A. Describe the concepts and conventions of orthographic drawing.
   B. Describe orthographic construction methods of plan, elevation and
section views.
   C. Use the architect’s scale to transcribe and construct drawings.
   D. Organize the page.
   E. Describe the process of dimensioning to communicate scale.
   F. Describe the construction and types of visual aids to enhance
communication.
   G. Use line weights, value and texture to define spatial relationships,
emphasis and realism appropriate to multi-view drawing.

VIII. Paraline, Axonometric and Oblique Drawings
   A. Describe the types of single-view drawings, their characteristics
and uses.
   B. Construct axonometric and oblique drawings.
   C. Use line weights, value and texture to define spatial relationships,
emphasis and realism appropriate to paraline drawings.

IX. Sun, Shade and Shadow
   A. Describe the basic concepts and vocabulary of light, shade and
shadow as applied to observing and recording the built and natural
environment.
   B. Cast shade and shadows in multi-view drawing using the “common
method.”
   C. Cast shade and shadows in paraline drawing.
   D. Cast shade and shadows in perspective view drawing.
   E. Use line weights, value and texture to define shade and shadows.
   F. Use shade and shadows to communicate spatial relationships.

X. Architectural Research and Writing
   A. Find credible resources from a variety of sources to use in the
research essay.
   B. Compile a bibliography.
   C. Synthesize resources by summarizing, paraphrasing and/or quoting.
   D. Organize synthesized resources into an essay which is informative or
persuasive.
   
XI. Conceptual and Visual Vocabulary
   A. Describe the elements used in architectural graphics and design.
   B. Apply the visual characteristics to the elements used in
architectural graphics and design.
   C. Demonstrate the principles of design used in architectural graphics
and design.

XII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the studio, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop teamwork skills, including solving problems in
groups, building consensus and responding to supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attitude and Work Habits: Class attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the studio and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition,
collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Studio work will be evaluated through scheduled group critiques,
individual project evaluation forms and conferences.

Student evaluation by project and final course grade will be based on the
following:

The successful completion of all assigned projects including:
  Daily Projects and Assignments   
  Quizzes and Tests        
  Class Participation/Attendance  
  Final Portfolio    
  

Grading Scale:
 100% - 90%   = A
  89% - 80%   = B
  79% - 70%   = C
  69% - 60%   = D
  59% - below = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARCH 131

  • Title: Architectural Graphics*
  • Number: ARCH 131
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ARCH 127.

Description:

This course builds upon the conceptual and manual skills acquired in Introduction to Architectural Graphics. Students will expand their ability by learning to apply a variety of media and advanced drawing systems, such as design drawing techniques, model building, graphic diagramming, grid perspective drawing, projection perspective drawing, and shade and shadow studies. Emphasis will continue to be on learning to think in spatial terms as well as developing a new repertoire of graphic presentation skills. 6 hrs. integrated lecture, studio/wk. This course is only offered in the spring semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the concepts of and demonstrate the skills necessary to use “direct perspective methods for design development and communication.

  2. Describe the types, characteristics, materials and methods of construction used in three-dimensional architectural models.

  3. Define the purpose of architectural diagrams and communicate that understanding through appropriate graphic symbols, media and techniques.

  4. Using conceptual and manual skills, construct one- and two-point common method perspective drawings.

  5. Construct one- and two-point grid perspective drawings.

  6. Demonstrate and illustrate the graphic vocabulary of line weights, tones, and textures which describe the components and properties of three-dimensional subjects.

  7. Observe, describe and calculate light, shade and shadow.

  8. Cast shades and shadows in paraline, multi-view and perspective drawings.

  9. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Perspective Drawing as Design Tool
   A. Describe the basic concepts and vocabulary of the  direct perspective method, e.g., conceptual drawing, representational drawing, etc.
   B. Use overlays as a method for building drawings.
   C. Use direct” perspective methods to communicate graphically design concepts.
   D. Observe, organize and communicate spatial relationships.
   E. Control line weights, value and texture to establish interest and spatial relationships.


II. Model Building
   A. Describe the types and characteristics of three dimensional models, e.g., study, presentation, etc.
   B. Describe the materials, tools and techniques used in model construction.
   C. Describe the relationship between two-dimensional drawing and three-dimensional form generation.
   D. Illustrate fundamental construction techniques, including cutting, sanding, joining.


III. Graphic Diagramming
   A. Describe the concepts, functions and appropriate applications of graphic diagramming, e.g., bubble, functional, flow, analytic diagrams, etc.
   B. Collect, abstract and express through graphic media symbols appropriate to diagramming.
   C. Apply diagram vocabulary and techniques through basic diagram exercises, e.g., bubble diagram.


IV. Basic Grid Perspective Drawing
   A. Describe the concepts, vocabulary and conventions of basic grid perspective drawing.
   B. List the criteria for selection of the type of grid based on the content to be visually communicated.
   C. Construct the basic one- and two-point grid.
   D. Illustrate techniques to speed construction, e.g., proportional divisions, etc.
   E. Use perspective grid sheets.
   F. Use the architect’s scale to transcribe information and construct drawings.
   G. Organize the page.
   H. Use line weights, value and texture to define spatial relationships, emphasis and realism appropriate to basic grid perspective drawing.


V. Perspective Projection Drawing
   A. Describe the concepts, vocabulary and conventions of perspective projection drawing.
   B. List the criteria for selection of the type of perspective projection method based on the content to be visually communicated.
   C. Illustrate perspective projection construction steps and techniques for one and two point common methods.
   D. Use the architect’s scale to transcribe information and construct drawings.
   E. Organize the page.
   F. Use line weights, value and texture to define spatial relationships, emphasis and realism appropriate to perspective drawing.


VI. Shade and Shadow
   A. Describe the basic concepts and vocabulary of light, shade and shadow as applied to observing and recording the built and natural environment, e.g., bearing, attitude, etc.
   B. Read sun charts and find the altitude component angle.
   C. Describe the fundamentals of shade and shadow, e.g., shadow box, plane, wedge, etc.
   D. Cast shades and shadows in paraline drawing.
   E. Cast shades and shadows in multi-view drawing.
   F. Cast shades and shadows in perspective view drawing.
   G. Use line weights, value and texture to define shade.
   H. Use shadow to communicate spatial relationships.


VII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow employees appropriate for the studio, including giving and accepting criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   Submission of final portfolio    70% of grade
   Sketchbook assignment            10% of grade
   Attendance/class participation   10% of grade
   Written research assignments     10% of grade
                                   100%
Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the studio, and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.
Studio work will be evaluated through scheduled group critiques,
individual project evaluation forms and conferences.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARCH 140

  • Title: Architectural Design*
  • Number: ARCH 140
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ARCH 127.

Description:

This course introduces the student to the process and vocabulary of design. The purpose of the content is to develop the ability to solve two- and three-dimensional design problems with basic methods, vocabulary and media appropriate to the architectural profession. This course is only offered in the spring semester. 6 hrs. integrated lecture, studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use a professional vocabulary to describe and define two-dimensional and three-dimensional design problems and their solutions.

  2. Demonstrate the relationships that exist between visual elements, line, shape, value, texture and space and the underlying principles of visual perception, organization, and structure.

  3. Describe and apply the visual and structural qualities inherent in effective three-dimensional forms.

  4. Describe and apply the visual attributes and properties of three-dimensional form.

  5. Describe the relationships that exist between structural form and its function in the environment.

  6. Describe and demonstrate applications of the elements of form that define space.

  7. Describe the methods of defining space and the qualities of defined space.

  8. Demonstrate the conceptual understanding of spatial relationships and organizations.

  9. Using the appropriate visual and verbal vocabulary, analyze specific settings and organize sequences of spaces.

  10. Demonstrate manual skill in the use of tools and materials commonly used in the solution of three-dimensional design problems.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Principles of Two-Dimensional Visual Perception and Organization
   A. Visual perception
      1. Describe the principles of visual grouping, including:
         a. Proximity of objects
         b. Similarity of elements
         c. Negative spaces from organization
         d. Closure
      2. Describe the methods to achieve unity, including:
         a. Proximity
         b. Repetition
         c. Continuation
         d. Variety
      3. Describe the devices to show depth to create the illusion of space, including:
         a. Size
         b. Overlapping
         c. Vertical location
         d. Aerial perspective
         e. Linear perspective
         f. Limitations of linear perspective
      4. Describe other devices to create the illusion of space, including:
         a. Amplified perspective
         b. Multiple perspective
         c. Isometric projection
         d. Open form/closed form
         e. Recession - plane and diagonal
         f. Transparency
         g. Spatial puzzles:  Piranesl, Escher, and Magritte
   B. Describe the different types of balance, including:
      1. Symmetrical balance
      2. Asymmetrical balance
      3. Radial balance
      4. Crystallographic balance - allover pattern
   C. List three types of rhythm, providing examples of each:
      1. Rhythm and motion
      2. Alternating rhythm
      3. Progressive rhythm
   D. Describe strategies for creating the illusion of motion:
      1. Anticipated movement
      2. Repeated figure
      3. Fuzzy outlines
      4. Multiple image
      5. Directional use of visual elements
   E. Emphasis/focal point
      1. Describe ways to achieve emphasis, including:
         a. Emphasis by contrast
         b. Emphasis by isolation
         c. Emphasis by placement
      2. Explain the degree of emphasis for establishing a focal point, including:
         a. Dominance
         b. Relationship to the whole design
      3. Explain the effects of absence of focal point
   F. Line
      1. Describe the types of line, including:
         a. Actual
         b. Implied
         c. Psychic
      2. Describe the qualities of a line, including:
         a. Direction
         b. Quality
         c. Control and gesture
         d. Lost and found contour
         e. Shape
         f. Value
   G. Texture
      1. Describe the two basic types of texture:
         a. Tactile
         b. Visual
      2. Differentiate between texture and patter
   H. List the seven definitions of shape and describe the impact on volume:
      1. Neutralism and distortion
      2. Idealism
      3. Abstraction
      4. Non-objective
      5. Rectilinear
      6. Curvilinear
      7. Positive/negative
   I. Value/light and dark
      1. List the attributes of value:
         a. Value pattern - high key, low key
         b. Value as emphasis
         c. Value and space
      2. Describe the techniques to achieve value
   J. Color
      1. Define the properties of color:
         a. Hue
         b. Value
         c. Intensity
      2. Compare cool/warm colors
      3. Describe how color is used to achieve balance and space
      4. Describe the role of color schemes in architectural design
      5. Describe the effects color is used to achieve, including:
         a. Local, optical, arbitrary
         b. Emotional color
         c. Color symbolism
         d. Color versus value

II. Fundamental Principles, Generalizations, and Theories as Applied to Understanding Three-Dimensional Design
   A. Design conceptualization (where ideas come from)
      1. Describe the need for both originality and sources
      2. Describe the role of sketching and modeling in the creative process
      3. Describe the steps of the creative design process:
         a. Acceptance and definition
         b. Ideation
         c. Judgment (a continuous decision-making process)
   B. Visual elements of form
      1. Define line, including:
         a. Direction — the fundamental characteristic
         b. Explicit and implicit lines
      2. Describe how surface is the fundamental characteristic of plane
      3. Define volume
      4. Explain how the visual elements are combined
   C. Describe the visual properties of form, including:
       1. Shape
       2. Size
       3. Color
       4. Texture
       5. Position
       6. Orientation
       7. Visual inertia
       8. Primary shapes
       9. Platonic solids
      10. Regular and irregular forms
      11. Transformation of form
      12. Dimensional transformation
      13. Subtractive forms
      14. Additive forms, including:
          a. Centralized
          b. Linear
          c. Radial
          d. Clustered
          e. Grid
      15. Formal collisions of geometry
      16. Articulation of form:
          a. Edges and corners
          b. Surfaces
   D. Organization of form
      1. Describe the role of perception, including:
         a. Resemblance
         b. Proximity
         c. Similarity
      2. Explain the physical forces related to form:
         a. Weight
         b. Balance (equilibrium/stability)
         c. Gravity
         d. Tension
         e. Compression
         f. Torsion (shear)
      3. Describe the spatial organizational systems, including:
         a. Cellular
         b. Cylindrical/core structure
         c. Planar systems
         d. Trusses and space frames
         e. Rigid frame
         f. Slab
         g. Shell
         h. Cable
         i. Membrane
   E. Organizations of form and space
      1. Describe the spatial relationships, including:
         a. Space within a space
         b. Interlocking spaces
         c. Adjacent spaces
         d. Spaces linked by a common space
      2. Describe the spatial organizations:
         a. Centralized
         b. Linear
         c. Radial
         d. Clustered
         e. Grid

III. Circulation
   A. Describe the elements of circulation:
      1. The building approach
      2. Building entrances
      3. Configuration of the path
      4. Path-space relationships
      5. Form of the circulation space

IV. Proportion and Scale
   A. Define proportion
   B. Describe proportioning systems, including:
      1. The golden section
      2. The orders
      3. Renaissance theories
      4. The modulator
      5. The ken
      6. Anthropomorphic proportions
   C. Define scale and describe its effect on design

V. Principles for the Organization of Forms and Spaces
   A. In specific designs, apply each of the following principles:
      1. Axis
      2. Symmetry
      3. Hierarchy
      4. Datum
      5. Rhythm and repetition
      6. Transformation

VI. Architectural Design Considerations for Effective Functional Space
   A. In specific design, apply each of the following functions:
      1. Activity/space relationships
      2. Ergonomics
      3. Circulation
      4. Structural organization
      5. Mechanical services
   B. For each of the following state context:
      1. Site features (foliage, topography, views, etc.)
      2. Climate (sun, wind, temperature, humidity, etc.)
      3. Man-made characteristics (existing buildings, services)
   C. For each of the following modes of production, allow for:
      1. Specific materials
      2. Required crafts and levels of craftsmanship
   D. To create an appropriate artistic statement incorporate each of the following:
      1. Composition
      2. Archetypal form
      3. Spatial behavior

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   Submission of final portfolio    70% of grade
   Sketchbook assignment            10% of grade
   Attendance/class participation   10% of grade
   Written research assignments     10% of grade
                                   100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the studio, and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Studio work will be evaluated through scheduled group critiques, individual project evaluation forms and conferences.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARCH 210

  • Title: Design History & Society
  • Number: ARCH 210
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The nature of design, even more than the traditional fine arts, responds to and is indeed inseparable from the culture and society in which it exists. This course provides a survey of design history from the nineteenth-century Industrial Revolution to the present, with emphasis on graphic and industrial design and art and architecture, examining the history of design as it corresponds to changes in economics, politics, technology, industrialization, and other societal factors. While focusing on the events and achievements in modern Western cultures there will be selected references to pre-industrial landmarks and developments and a global scope will be examined. Design will be studied as a social practice that contributes to the production, maintenance, and representation of culture and society. The course will focus less on aesthetics than on the cultural milieu in which designers have created images and objects that give physical form to intangible ideas. 3hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the various forces of culture and society that manifest themselves in designed objects.
  2. Analyze how aesthetics, technology, economics, politics, government, and other social factors influenced the development of design.
  3. Investigate the evolution of design as a trade or profession and consider its dynamic and changing nature.
  4. Trace the development from agrarian communities to modern manufacturing societies and how the systems used by those societies evolve and affect the nature of designed objects.
  5. Examine how expanding global contact and the accompanying influence of non-European cultures has influenced Western design.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of how media and changes in communication have affected design and the design process. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Manifestation of Culture and Society in Design 
   A. Consider the role of design in religious and feudal societies such as in monastic communities and scriptoria.
   B. Examine how market-driven capitalist societies have nourished the development of design. 
   C. Recognize how urbanization has increasingly separated creators from consumers. 
   D. Identify the shifting centers of influence.
       1. Local focus of feudal systems 
       2. The role of church and religion 
       3. The establishment of centralized monarchies, kingdoms, and countries 
       4. Post-World War II shifts in society and centers of influence 
   E. Understand the contributions of education and wealth to the appreciation and consumption of designed objects. 
   F. Examine the importance of mass marketing of values like fame and style to drive desire for designed products.
 
II. Technology and Economics 
   A. Recognize the nascent forms of design created in antiquity using ephemeral materials such as fiber, animal parts, mud, and simple pigments.
   B. Recognize the scope of design in a low technology environment of handcrafted objects. 
   C. Examine the development of paper and printing processes and systems.
       1. Chinese paper and printing technology 
       2. German contributions in typography and printing 
       3. Photography and half-tone printing 
       4. Cold type and computers
   D. Understand how increasing mechanization and new processes affect the production and form of produced objects.
       1. Mass production and automation
       2. Economies of scale reduces costs 
       3. Industrial manufacturing processes transfer influence to consumer markets 
       4. Computers changing from mainframes to handheld expand their role
       5. The expansive development of increasingly affordable design software
       6. The explosion of CAD/CAM capabilities 
   E. Understand how industrial materials have increased design options. 
       1. Synthetics and polymers and plastics and other expanded options replace more basic materials
       2. Depletion of materials and sustainable options
   F. Examine the importance of mass marketing of consumer goods to the design process.
       1. Catalog retailers in the 19th Century 
       2. Development of wholesale/retail networks
       3. Shopping malls and big-box stores 
       4. Online communication expanding sourcing and selling options allowing niche marketing
 
III. Politics and Government 
   A. Examine how war and nationalistic propaganda have contributed to design. 
       1. Election and political campaigns needing propaganda vehicles 
       2. Fund raising, bond drives, and recruiting posters 
   B. Consider the use of design as a display of national pride at expositions and world’s fairs.
 
IV. The Training and Educational Systems That Contributed to the Professionalization of Design 
   A. Understand the nature of localized and individualized training and production. 
   B. Identify the contributions of guilds and workshops.
   C. Recognize the various late nineteenth and early twentieth century local or regional movements. 
       1. Arts and Crafts
       2. Japonisme and Ukiyo-e 
       3. Art Nouveau 
       4. Jugendstil 
       5. Vienna Secession 
       6. Peter Behrens and rationalism 
       7. Futurism & Constructivism 
       8. De Stijl
       9. The Bauhaus 
   D. Recognize the centralized systems developed by governmental or quasi-governmental academies.
       1. Establishment of French Academies 
       2. Establishment of academies and schools across Europe based on the French model
   E. Understand the development and contributions of university-based education. 
       1. Establishment of colleges and land grant institutions in the United States
       2. Expansion of education in the United States with the GI Bill of Rights
 
V. Design in Increasingly Urbanized Societies 
   A. Recognize how increasing population density in urban areas has affected the impact of visual influences. 
   B. Identify how the cultural and ethnic diversity found in urban areas contributes to design.
   C. Consider the development of the Arts and Crafts movement in response to increasing industrialization.
 
VI. Globalization and Design 
   A. Recognize the limitations of small-scale community-focused design.
   B. Identify how increasing contacts with distant peoples contributes to the form of design objects.
       1. Increasing contact between ancient cultures in the Mediterranean, North Atlantic, and elsewhere
       2. Medieval Crusades and pilgrimages 
       3. Muslim traders
       4. Asian materials and designs 
   C. Understand the impact of designing and producing objects for distant consumers. 
       1. Differences in labor costs and manufacturing specialization 
       2. Communicating with and marketing to a non-local audience
 
VII. Communication and Design
   A. Consider the various forms of electric and electronic media and their contribution to design. 
       1. Shift from verbal to audio to visual communication
       2. The affect of immediacy as communication gets quicker
       3. The continuing truth of Marshall McLuhan’s idea of “The Medium is the Message” 
   B. Examine the relationship of sales, feedback, and consumer research on designed objects.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Quizzes and examinations – 50-80% of course grade 
2. Additional written assignments or projects – 20-50% of course grade 
3. Grades corresponding to the traditional academic formula: 
   90-100% = A 
   80-89% = B 
   70-79% = C 
   60-69% = D 
   59% or less = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARCH 220

  • Title: Sustainability in the Built Environment
  • Number: ARCH 220
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course examines evolving issues of sustainability as they pertain to the built environment. The course will cover a broad spectrum of issues, with attention focused on historical precedent, changing social matrices, technological advancements, political and regulatory consequences, and potential future transformations. Analysis of sustainability as a concept and societal goal will be considered throughout the course as we consider issues that are both local and global. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Synthesize the various viewpoints on sustainable built environments. 
  2. Evaluate the success and relevance of various methods of achieving sustainability.
  3. Critique the evolution of philosophies and approaches to sustainable designs. 
  4. Extrapolate the effect of fluctuating availability of natural resources on designs and materials.
  5. Differentiate how competing physical and social demands are negotiated in the built environment.  
  6. Identify examples of past issues associated with creating a sustainable built environment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Approaches to Sustainability

A. Analyze the various options for sustainable building systems and designs.

B. Explore the various options for sustainable building materials.

C. Identify the various impacts of sustainable designs and human culture.

II. Success and Relevance Evaluations

A. Evaluate the success of previous systems and methods for sustainable design.

B. Develop ideas for new systems and or methods to improve sustainability of the built environment.

III. Philosophies and Pedagogies

A. Consider alternate approaches toward sustainable design solutions.

1. Examine legislative regulation and mandates.

2. Examine economic and market forces.

B. Investigate emerging technologies and designs.

IV. Resource Availability and Design Solutions

A. Identify the design impacts of locally sourced materials and design methods. 

B. Research appropriateness of locally sourced materials and methods.

V. Physical and Social Demands

A. Identify current regulatory and enforcement trends in sustainable design.

B. Identify the social expectations and ramifications of sustainable design.

VI. Historical Paradigms of Sustainability in the Built Environment

A. Evaluate the pre-history of environmentalism.

B. Evaluate the culture and counter-culture of the 1960s.

1. Examine increasing population demands and increasing consumption of resources and materials.

2. Examine increasing use of technological and chemical solutions and reactions to them.

C. Evaluate the shortages and energy crisis of the 1970s.

1. Interpret the ramifications of cartels and shortages.

2. Detect the efforts of reducing consumption and expectations.

D. Evaluate the increasing discourse of sustainability.

1. Cite examples of expanding world markets and globalization of world demands.

2. Compare contemporary issues of pollution mitigation and alternative energy sources.

3. Predict political and market responses.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-15%    Attendance and class participation
45-70%    Quizzes and examinations
20-40%    Assignments and projects

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARCH 244

  • Title: Architectural History Before the Modern Era
  • Number: ARCH 244
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will acquaint students with the architecture and ideas of world civilizations from prehistory to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Emphasis is on architecture as an integrated element of the development of commercial, technological, and ideological transferences among different regions, nascent religious groups and evolving political enterprises. The course will consider architectural styles and cultures from around the globe. 3hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of architecture of selected civilizations from the prehistoric to the Industrial Revolution.

  2. Identify the influences of religion, politics, art and social customs of the architectural styles.

  3. Identify architectural materials, designs and motifs common to the historical periods.  

  4. Recognize and differentiate specific examples of architecture of the countries and periods being studied.

  5. Compare and analyze architecture across cultures as it relates to the world today. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Historical development of the architecture of major civilizations from prehistoric to the industrial revolution  

A. Recognize the peculiar and singular traits present in the architecture of various cultures.

B. Differentiate the geographic and chronological relationship of architectural styles and trends.

II. Influences of Religion, Politics, Art and Social Customs of the Architectural Styles  

A. Identify historical developments as they relate to social customs.

B. Explain how religion and politics relate to social structure and architecture.

III. Architectural Materials, Designs and Motifs Common to the Historical Periods  

A.  Compare the designs and formal properties of the architecture of Western and Non-Western cultures from antiquity to the Industrial Revolution.  

B.  Assess stylistic motifs and patterns used in the architecture of the major cultural categories.

C.  Differentiate the materials that typify various cultures.

IV. Examples of Architecture of the Countries and Periods Being Studied  

 A. Define names and uses of architectural examples.

 B. Identify the construction methods and processes used in architecture.

 C. Describe construction techniques.

 D. Compare materials and construction to identify period and culture of origin.

V. Architecture Across Cultures as it Relates to the World Today  

A. Explain the similarities and differences between the various buildings and structures.

B. Identify and explain various examples of architecture that constitute the Western and Non-Western architectural canon.  

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

Attendance/class participation            10%-15% of grade

Quizzes and examinations                  45%-70% of grade

Written research papers and projects  20%-40% of grade

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARCH 245

  • Title: Architectural History: Modern
  • Number: ARCH 245
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will investigate the architecture of the Modern Era. The focus of this course is on the principles of design, education of the architect, artistic forces and concepts of the built environment within its historical context. The work of prominent architects and their architectural theories will be covered and analyzed. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the progression of architectural design from the 19th century to the end of the Modern Era.
  2. Differentiate the stylistic movements of the Modern Era.
  3. Discuss the principles of design and explain their application to each structure.
  4. Discuss the shaping of architecture by cultural forces.
  5. Discuss the correlation between art and architecture.
  6. Identify technological advances in construction methods.
  7. Define and demonstrate use of architectural terminology.
  8. Name various types of building materials and rationales for their selection.
  9. Identify specific works by name, location, architect and period.
  10. Examine the design and function of specific buildings.
  11. Define the emerging role of the architect.
  12. Execute in-depth architectural analyses.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  Review the Industrial Revolution.
   A. Explain the impact on architecture through the use of new
materials.
   B. Address the need for new building types.
   C. Discuss the changing role of the architect.

II.  Architecture in the 19th Century
   A. Discuss the rise of Architectural Eclecticism.
   B. Discuss the origins of Neoclassicism.
      1. Evaluate the rise of Neoclassicism in Europe, Russia and the
United States.
      2. Identify important Neoclassical architects and their respective
works and theories.
   C. Investigate the causes and the building types of the Gothic
Revival.
   D. Discuss the École des Beaux-Arts. 
      1. Identify selected European works and their respective
architects.
      2. Evaluate the importance of the École des Beaux-Arts on North
American Architecture and architectural education.
   E. Discuss the impact of new architectural materials of the period. 
   F. Discuss the development of the Arts and Crafts Movement.
      1. Investigate the societal reasons behind the movement.
      2. Analyze selected works and the architect’s philosophy behind
them.
   G. Analyze the origins, architects and works of Art Nouveau.
   H. Investigate the Viennese Secession.
   I. Discuss the search for an American Architectural Style.
      1. Analyze “Richardson Romanesque.”
      2. Identify the “Chicago School” and its associated architects.
      3. Evaluate the architectural impact of McKim, Mead and White.

III. The 20th Century and Modernism 
   A. Examine the Idea of Modernism.
   B. Describe the different stylistic movements of early Modernism.
      1. Discuss the development of the “Prairie House” by Frank Lloyd
Wright.
      2. Review Peter Behrens and the Deutscher Werkbund.
      3. Explore “Futurism and Constructivism.”
      4. Examine Dutch and German Expressionism.
      5. Analyze Art Deco and its materials.
      6. Explain the rationale behind the De Stijl movement.
   C. Discuss the development of reinforced concrete and its importance to
20th-century engineering and architecture.
   D. Analyze the early works of Le Corbusier.
   E. Discuss Walter Gropius and Bauhaus, and their impact on Modernism.
   F. Analyze the direction of architecture during the “Late
Modernism” period.
      1. Discuss Mies van der Rohe and his contribution to Modernism.
      2. Explore the International Style and its promoters.
      3. Compare the later works of Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier to
their earlier designs.
   G. Investigate the architects of the mid and late 20th century and
compare their works.
   H. Discuss the decline of Modernism and the architects of
Post-Modernism.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance/class participation      10% - 15% of grade
Quizzes and examinations            50% - 80% of grade
Research projects                   10% - 35% of grade
Total                               100%

Grade Criteria:
90% - 100% A
80% - 89% B
70% - 79% C
60% - 69% D
59% and below F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARCH 245H

  • Title: HON: Architectural History: Modern*
  • Number: ARCH 245H
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARCH 250

  • Title: Architectural Design Thinking*
  • Number: ARCH 250
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ARCH 127 and ARCH 131 and ARCH 140.

Description:

This course will enrich concepts previously encountered in architecture studio courses and explore new methodologies that apply to design thinking processes. Students will encounter ill-structured, undefined design problems and learn to analyze and determine numerous ways to evaluate and illustrate the outcomes in multiple design solutions. Collaboration is encouraged between individuals and group participants using various processes to interpret, develop and visually construct final solutions to projects using computer-based design applications, free-hand drawing techniques and three-dimensional model making capabilities. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss design methods as incremental and cyclical processes of research, analysis and reaction.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of design thinking as a response to human interaction in the built environment.
  3. Create multiple solutions to ill-structured design problems.
  4. Develop the ability to work collectively and independently throughout the design process.
  5. Illustrate architectural concepts using a range of analog and digital techniques and materials.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Characteristics of Design Methods

A. Explain the methods of research and analysis as a process in design.

B. Analyze the different types of information and how they apply directly to design solutions.

II. Design Thinking Based on Human Interaction

A. Illustrate how architectural design is influenced by human scale and proportion.

B. Create solutions reflecting the cultural context of the environment.

III. Ill-Structured Problem-Solving

A. Develop multiple solutions that illustrate different approaches and methods to undefined design problems.

B. Analyze and compare different processes throughout the design.

C. Examine different techniques to hypothesize possible solutions.

IV. Collaborative and Independent Study

A. Demonstrate differences in communication techniques between group and individual formats.

B. Develop communication skills to present in different media and environments.

V. Analog and Digital Techniques

A. Explore and integrate sustainable concepts into the final design solutions.

B. Experiment with different technologies and media to best illustrate the design solutions.

1. Integrate analogue and digital media into visual presentations.

2. Create two-dimensional designs and three-dimensional models in final presentations using various materials and media.

3. Develop the graphic presentation as a collective whole incorporating methods and concepts pursued in the final design solution.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

80-90%    Projects and research
10-20%    Participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

1. Students will need basic computer skills for word processing, graphic arts, computer-aided drafting and three-dimensional design software.  Students will also build on skills developed in previous architecture courses in sketching, technical drawing and modeling.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARCH 292

  • Title: Special Topics:
  • Number: ARCH 292
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 3
  • Contact Hours: 1 - 3
  • Lecture Hours: 1 - 3

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to diverse areas of architecture not usually taught in the curriculum to interested and qualified students within the program.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Develop an understanding of the special topic that can be supported by such means as textual evidence or research. 
  2. Define, explain and apply key terms and concepts within the scope of the topic.
  3. Demonstrate conceptual understanding of the special topic.
  4. Utilize research and/or analysis skills relevant to the area and issues of study.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Because of the nature of a Special Topics course, the course content outline and competencies will vary, depending on the special topic being offered. The Special Topics course outline must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC-approved courses and must include the standard course objectives for a Special Topics class. The course content outline and competencies must be written in outcomes-based language.

In order to maintain course consistency, rigor and uniqueness, each section of this course first must be reviewed and approved by the Architecture faculty prior to its being offered. The Architecture faculty and Chair and the Business Division Dean will review each Special Topics course to be offered, and approve the course content.  The Architecture Department will also determine when and if the course may be taught.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings, discussion, written assignments, research, individual or group projects, etc., dependent upon the needs of the topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Any specific Special Topics topic may not be repeated within a two-year sequence.
  2. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).