Health Care Info Systems (HCIS)

Courses

HCIS 230   Introduction to Health Information Systems (2 Hours)

This course provides an overview of the major concepts of health information systems for individuals with backgrounds in information technology (IT) or healthcare who are considering a transition into health information systems. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 255   Technology Concepts in Healthcare (2 Hours)

This course provides a basic overview of computing concepts related to the healthcare sector. Topics include computing terminology, computer architecture, and networking and data communication. The design and development of a large healthcare computing system is discussed, including the electronic health record. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 261   Networking and Health Information Exchange (2 Hours)

This course provides an in-depth analysis of data mobility. The hardware infrastructure (wired, wireless and devices supporting them), the International Organization for Standards (ISO) stack, standards, Internet protocols, federations and grids, the Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN) and other nationwide approaches are discussed. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 262   Customer Service in the Health Environment (2 Hours)

This course introduces the skills necessary to communicate effectively across the full range of roles that will be encountered in healthcare and public health settings. Appropriate customer service skills, effective written and oral communication, and ethical and cultural awareness are emphasized. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 263   Working with Health Information Technology (HIT) Systems (2 Hours)

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to work with real technology used in the healthcare environment. This course focuses on the end user experience with emphasis also placed on standards, system usability, security and integration. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HCIS 264   Configuration and Implementation of Electronic Health Records (2 Hours)

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to experience real-world tasks in the role of a configuration/implementation analyst in the health information technology (HIT) workplace. This course focuses on designing and building a system with emphasis placed on implementation and configuration. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HCIS 265   Installation and Maintenance of Health IT Systems (2 Hours)

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to experience real-world tasks typically performed by an electronic health record (EHR) system administrator or support technician. Topics include testing prior to implementation, system configuration and system support. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HCIS 267   EHR Design, Functionality and Usability (3 Hours)

This course discusses human factors associated with designing and implementing health information systems (HIS). Concepts of usability and the effects of new technology and workflow redesign on downstream processes, such as clinical decision support, will be covered. This course provides an overview of the most utilized electronic health systems. System features are evaluated and compared as they would relate to practical deployments. Key factors such as cost, licensing and staffing are also discussed.

HCIS 270   Health Information Systems Internship* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: Enrollment in Health Information Systems (HCIS) coursework and Department approval (It is recommended students complete 10 credit hours of HCIS coursework prior to enrollment.)

Students will work in an approved training situation under instructional supervision. The internship is designed to give the student the opportunity to use the knowledge and skills acquired in the healthcare information systems (HCIS) courses. An average of 40-60 onsite hours will be required along with class assignments for a total of 90 hrs./semester.

HCIS 271   The Culture of Healthcare (2 Hours)

This course introduces students to job expectations in healthcare settings. Topics also include the organization of care inside a practice setting, privacy laws, the changing environment of healthcare delivery, and professional and ethical issues. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 272   Terminology in Health Care Settings (2 Hours)

This course introduces students to terminology and clinical procedures associated with body systems. It also covers terminology related to health information management (HIM), health information technology (HIT), and public health. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 273   Quality Improvement in Healthcare (2 Hours)

This course introduces the concepts of health information technology (HIT) and practice workflow redesign as instruments of quality improvement (QI). Students will learn methods to establish a culture that supports increased quality and safety in healthcare. Approaches to assessing patient safety issues and implementing quality management and reporting through electronic systems will be discussed. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 274   Healthcare Workflow Analysis and Redesign (2 Hours)

This course introduces healthcare workflow analysis and redesign as a necessary component of complete practice automation. The topics of process validation and change management are also covered. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 275   Health Information Systems (2 Hours)

This course addresses concepts of information systems specific to healthcare and public health applications. Students will be introduced to health information technology (HIT) standards, health-related data structures, software applications and enterprise information architecture in healthcare and public health organizations. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 277   Training and Instructional Design (2 Hours)

This course provides participants with essential knowledge and skills to deliver training to adult learners implementing electronic health records (EHRs) in a variety of healthcare settings. The Instructional Systems Design (ISD) model, which includes analysis of the learner and learning environment, design and development of customized education, implementation of the training plan and evaluation of the training program's effectiveness, will be used. 2 hrs lecture/wk.

HCIS 292   Special Topics: (1-2 Hour)

This course periodically presents specialized topics in Health Information Systems (HIS) that are not available in the regularly offered curriculum. Special Topics may be repeated for credit, but only on different topics.

HCIS 230

  • Title: Introduction to Health Information Systems
  • Number: HCIS 230
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course provides an overview of the major concepts of health information systems for individuals with backgrounds in information technology (IT) or healthcare who are considering a transition into health information systems. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the history and major concepts of health information technology systems (HIT).
  2. Describe the roles and environments of healthcare.
  3. Discuss regulations, ethical, and cultural issues related to healthcare.
  4. Describe the electronic health record (EHR) and its impact on healthcare.
  5. Explain basic computing concepts in relation to healthcare.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History and Major Concepts of HIT

A. Discuss the importance of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

B. Describe the key aspects of meaningful use.

C. Discuss principles of usability and design.

D. Define what is meant by clinical decision support (CDS) systems.

E. Discuss foundational elements of workflow analysis and process redesign.

II. Healthcare Roles and Environments

A. Discuss the roles of various healthcare professionals and health information technologists.

B. Compare the major types and functions of different healthcare settings.

C. Discuss the language of healthcare.

D. Describe patient flow through the inpatient and outpatient settings.

E. Discuss professional behavior in the healthcare environment.

III. Healthcare Regulations, Ethical and Cultural Issues

A. Discuss privacy, confidentiality, security issues and related standards.

B. Discuss the major cultural issues in healthcare.

C. Identify the current challenges in healthcare quality.

D. Describe the role of a professional code of ethics in HIT.

E. Describe methods to ensure data security and confidentiality.

IV. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) and Its Impact on Healthcare

A. Identify factors affecting the need for an EHR.

B. Define functional requirements of an EHR.

C. Discuss the purpose of EHR components.

D. Discuss the differences between EHRs and personal health records (PHRs).

E. Discuss key issues in EHR development and implementation.

V. Computing Concepts in Healthcare

A. Describe basic concepts, components and use of HIS systems.

B. Describe hardware and software as it relates to healthcare.

C. Discuss the basics of computer networking.

D. Describe security concerns and safeguards.

E. Discuss the future of computing and its impact on healthcare.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Assignments and Projects
10-20%    Discussion Board
30-50%    Quizzes/Tests

Total:100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 255

  • Title: Technology Concepts in Healthcare
  • Number: HCIS 255
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course provides a basic overview of computing concepts related to the healthcare sector. Topics include computing terminology, computer architecture, and networking and data communication. The design and development of a large healthcare computing system is discussed, including the electronic health record. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Explain basic computing concepts and history in relation to healthcare.
  2. Describe and use the Internet and the World Wide Web in relation to healthcare.
  3. Discuss computer hardware and architecture and their use in healthcare settings.
  4. Explain different types of functionality of application and system software.
  5. Discuss a broad overview of programming languages and explain essential programming concepts.
  6. Discuss fundamental database concepts and create simple queries and tables.
  7. Discuss the basics of computer networking.
  8. Describe security concerns and safeguards.
  9. Describe the components and development of a large-scale system and its implementation in a complex health information system.
  10. Discuss the future of computing and its impact on healthcare.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Computing Concepts and History

A. List different types of computers and how they are used in healthcare.

B. Define the common elements of computer systems.

C. Describe the various hardware and software options for typical desktop, laptop and server systems in the healthcare environment.

D. Explain the development of computers and the Internet, including healthcare systems up until the present time.

II. Internet and the World Wide Web

A. Define the Internet and how to connect to it.

B. Define the World Wide Web and how to access it with a Uniform Resource Locator (URL).

C. Write effective search queries for Internet search engines, filter the results and evaluate credibility of information.

D. Discuss Internet security and privacy concerns.

E. List ethical issues for the Internet, including intellectual property rights, copyright and free speech.

F. Examine online healthcare applications and discuss associated security and privacy issues.

III. Computer Hardware and Architecture

A. List the major hardware components of a computer.

B. Describe how data is stored in memory and in secondary storage.

C. Describe how data is represented in binary code.

D. Describe the function of the central processing unit (CPU).

E. Describe how data is input/output from the computer.

F. Describe how a computer system works together.

G. Discuss specialized architectures and embedded systems used in healthcare settings.

IV. Application and System Software

A. Define application vs. system software.

B. Cite examples of application software and the elements that comprise them, focusing on healthcare systems.

C. Describe the functions of operating systems and file organization.

D. List different types of operating systems.

E. Explain the purpose and usage of file systems.

V. Overview of Programming Languages and Concepts

A. Define the purpose of programming languages.

B. Describe the different types of programming languages.

C. Explain the continuum of programming languages, from machine code and assembly languages through scripting languages and high-level structured programming languages.

D. Explain the compiling and interpreting process for computer programs.

E. Discuss simple computer programs with variables, loops and conditional statements.

F. Discuss additional programming concepts such as objects and modularity.

VI. Databases and the Structured Query Language (SQL)

A. Define and describe the purpose of databases.

B. Define a relational database.

C. Describe the SQL language.

D. Define the basic data operations for databases and how to implement them in SQL, including data modeling and normalization.

E. Design simple relational tables (and optionally implement them using database software).

F. Create simple querying statements for a database.

VII. Networks

A. List and describe the various types of network communications and network addressing.

B. List and define the different types of networks.

C. Describe different network topologies.

D. List and describe different network standards and protocols.

E. Describe wireless communication.

F. List and describe network hardware.

VIII. Security

A. Describe safeguards against common security concerns, including firewalls, encryption, virus protection software, and patterns and programming for security.

B. Describe security concerns for wireless networks and how to address them.

C. List security concerns and regulations for healthcare applications.

D. Describe security safeguards used for healthcare applications.

IX. Large-Scale System Components and Development

A. Describe the building blocks of a large-scale system.

B. Explain the initial design process and options for a large-scale system.

C. Describe the evaluation process and criteria for including and selecting existing software applications.

D. Describe the process for new software development.

E. Describe the different types of system testing and when testing should occur.

F. Describe system maintenance and explain the process of financially supporting large-scale systems over time.

X. Future of Computing

A. Describe the current trends in computing technology.

B. Discuss implications for healthcare systems, including potential risks.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:
30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion
Total       100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 261

  • Title: Networking and Health Information Exchange
  • Number: HCIS 261
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course provides an in-depth analysis of data mobility. The hardware infrastructure (wired, wireless and devices supporting them), the International Organization for Standards (ISO) stack, standards, Internet protocols, federations and grids, the Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN) and other nationwide approaches are discussed. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the network layers and functionality of the ISO Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model.

  2. Select appropriate network media types and hardware devices to facilitate data exchange.

  3. Describe the importance, utilization and development of standards and list standards-setting organizations relevant to health information systems.

  4. Discuss basic health data standards.

  5. Analyze key aspects and standards associated with the Electronic Health Record System Functional Model.

  6. Examine standards for the interchange of health data.

  7. Identify standards for electronic health record (EHR) applications.

  8. Explain enterprise architecture models.

  9. Discuss privacy, confidentiality, security issues and related standards.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The OSI Model

A. Explain the OSI representation of the various layers involved in networking, including the general functions of each layer and their interconnections.

B. Explain the concept of the Application, Presentation, Session, Transport, Network, Data Link and Physical layers.

C. Explain connection-oriented versus connectionless communication.

D. Explain the use of network addressing including security considerations and vulnerabilities.

II. Network Media and Hardware Communication Devices

A. Select appropriate network media types to facilitate networking and data exchange, taking into account access and regulatory requirements.

B. Select appropriate hardware devices to facilitate networking and data exchange, taking into account access and regulatory requirements.

III. National and International Standards Developing Organizations

A. Explain why standards related to networking and health information exchange are important, particularly in the current environment.

B. Describe how standards are developed, who develops them and how they are selected and accredited.

C. Explain the most common categories of standards.

D. Demonstrate how to find, obtain and use standards that are needed to facilitate networking and health information exchange.

IV. Basic Health Data Standards

A. Identify the set of standards necessary to establish semantic interoperability.

B. Describe the use, purpose and interrelation among sets of controlled vocabularies in use today.

C. Explain data elements, attributes of data elements, and the creation and purpose of the current standard.

D. Explain how templates and archetypes facilitate networking and information exchange.

E. Discuss Clinical Data Architecture (CDA), Continuity of Care Record (CCR), and Continuity of Care Document (CCD) standards and describe the relationship among these standards.

V. The Electronic Health Record Functional Model

A. Describe linking and aggregating data at all levels.

B. Describe how data may be interchanged among heterogeneous settings without loss of information.

C. Describe the most recent messaging standards.

D. Describe other data interchange standards including Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the Integrating and Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative.

E. Describe how model-based standards are created.

F. Define the methodology development framework.

G. Describe imaging standards.

H. Describe standards for pharmacy services.

I. Describe interface standards for medical devices.

J. Describe claims and reimbursement standards.

K. Describe the concept of profiling.

L. Describe the use and value of implementation guides.

VI. Health Data Interchange Standards

A. Analyze the fundamental structure and components of data.

B. Explain the relevance of health data interchange standards for health record mobility.

C. Explain the relevance of document and imaging standards for health record mobility.

D. Explain the relevance of medical device standards for health record mobility.

E. Explain the concept of profiling and the role of IHE in defining profiles.

VII. Standards for EHR Applications

A. Identify and discuss a family of clinical decision support standards, including Arden Syntax, clinical guidelines and "Info-buttons."

B. Discuss single sign-on standards and the Clinical Context Object Workgroup (CCOW) standard.

C. Define and discuss regulatory and patient safety standards, including reporting requirements.

D. Describe bar code standards.

E. Describe patient index, patient registries and record-locating standards.

VIII. Enterprise Architecture Models

A. Explain the significance of Service-Oriented Architecture in networking and health information exchange (HIE).

B. Explain the value of an enterprise architecture in networking and HIE.

C. Describe key elements of various service-oriented architecture platforms and infrastructure options.

D. Explain regional healthcare networks -- policy and implementation strategies.

E. Explain the concept of the NHIN.

IX. Privacy, Confidentiality, Security Issues and Standards

A. Discuss privacy, confidentiality requirements and related policies.

B. Discuss how to implement the requirements.

C. Define access control methods.

D. Describe how to secure data storage and transmission using data encryption, signatures, validation, non-repudiation and integrity.

E. Analyze access restrictions to data storage and retrieval (physical and software).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
0-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 262

  • Title: Customer Service in the Health Environment
  • Number: HCIS 262
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces the skills necessary to communicate effectively across the full range of roles that will be encountered in healthcare and public health settings. Appropriate customer service skills, effective written and oral communication, and ethical and cultural awareness are emphasized. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define customer service and explain key elements of customer service in health information technology (HIT).

  2. Discuss professional behavior in the healthcare environment.

  3. Discuss communication relevant to HIT, including purpose, meaning and disability etiquette.

  4. Identify core elements of effective communication.

  5. Summarize regulatory issues.

  6. Discuss aspects of team and small group communication.

  7. Describe conflict and conflict resolution, including techniques and strategies to resolve conflict.

  8. Explain ethical and cultural issues related to communication and customer service.

  9. Discuss personal communication in the healthcare workplace.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Customer Service in HIT

A. Describe the definitions of customer service.

B. Identify customers' needs based on context.

C. Discuss different metrics to measure customer service in HIT.

II. Professional Behavior in the Healthcare Environment

A. Define contextual norms expected in healthcare organizations.

B. Discuss the importance of dress, deportment, demeanor and grooming.

III. Overview of Communication Relevant to HIT

A. Explain the purpose and goal of professional communication.

B. Describe what is meant by effective and ineffective communication.

C. Identify communication needs of common roles in healthcare.

D. Describe the contribution of disability etiquette to professional communication.

IV. Key Elements of Effective Communication

A. Discuss the definition of communication.

B. Discuss assumptions used in communication.

C. Discuss the communication models from general to health-specific.

D. Discuss variables used in communication.

E. Define nonverbal communication.

F. Describe how nonverbal communication functions in the human communication process.

G. Describe specific dimensions and give examples of nonverbal communication.

H. Discuss communication in paper-based and electronic formats.

I. Discuss personal communication in the work setting.

J. Discuss listening skills.

K. Discuss diversity.

V. Regulatory Issues

A. Describe the importance of and guidelines associated with infection control.

B. Relate protection of yourself and others to standard precautions.

C. Explain the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and related communication.

VI. Team and Small Group Communication

A. Define group communication and tiered characteristics.

B. Describe goals, norms and cohesiveness of groups.

C. List stages of team communication.

D. Describe communication networks and sociograms.

VII. Conflict Resolution

A. Describe dimensions of conflict.

B. Define conflict.

C. Explain approaches used in conflict resolution.

D. Discuss conflict resolution styles.

E. Describe communication strategies to resolve conflict.

F. Discuss sources and strategies addressing technical implementation conflict.

VIII. Ethical and Cultural Issues Related to Communication and Customer Service

A. Define ethics and ethical dilemmas.

B. Differentiate between ethics and codified law.

C. Discuss the utilitarian, individualism, moral-rights and justice approaches to ethical decision making.

D. Describe the role of the medical ethics committee.

E. Define culture and diversity.

F. Describe the primary and secondary dimensions of diversity.

G. Explain the potential benefits and costs of workforce diversity and how diversity can be leveraged for better performance.

H. Discuss the role of ethnocentrism and stereotypes in communication.

I. Explain four major cultural differences and their effect on communication.

J. Discuss the major Equal Employment Opportunity laws.

K. Define cultural competency and describe its role in addressing health disparities.

IX. Personal Communication and Professionalism

A. Describe appropriate use of personal communication devices in the healthcare workplace.

B. Discuss the impact of inappropriate use of personal communication devices in the healthcare workplace.

C. Identify the differences between personal and professional communication.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
0-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 263

  • Title: Working with Health Information Technology (HIT) Systems
  • Number: HCIS 263
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to work with real technology used in the healthcare environment. This course focuses on the end user experience with emphasis also placed on standards, system usability, security and integration. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Describe basic concepts, components and use of health information technology (HIT) systems, and demonstrate beginning level competency in maneuvering within an HIT system.
  2. Identify functions of HIT systems.
  3. Explain common elements of health information exchange and standards and efforts to facilitate exchange.
  4. Define effective HIT systems.
  5. Discuss usability fundamentals in HIT systems.
  6. Explain HIT system facilitated errors, examine sources of errors and propose solutions.
  7. Identify threats and propose solutions in the areas of HIT privacy.
  8. Discuss HIT system planning, acquisition, installation and training.
  9. Identify potential adoption and installation issues of an HIT system and propose solutions.
  10. Examine the role of HIT in patient-centered care.
  11. Discuss the future of HIT.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. HIT Systems

A. Define a system and relate system concepts to HIT.

B. Discuss specific examples of HIT environments.

C. Identify common components of a clinical HIT system.

D. Demonstrate beginning level competency in maneuvering an HIT system.

II. HIT System Functions

A. Identify the HIT functions that support a generic ambulatory patient care process.

B. Identify the HIT functions that support a generic inpatient care process.

III. Information Exchange in HIT Systems

A. Identify common elements in HIT information exchange.

B. Explain the need for standards and why they exist.

C. Define and differentiate between messaging standards and terminology standards.

D. Compare current efforts to facilitate health information exchange between providers, communities, regions and the nation.

IV. HIT Systems

A. Identify characteristics of an effective HIT system.

B. Define and provide examples of how evidence-based practice can be supported in HIT systems.

C. Define and cite examples of usability, configurability, scalability and reliability in HIT systems.

D. List and contrast different types of reports/queries required for internal and external reporting.

V. HIT System Usability

A. Define usability in relation to HIT systems.

B. Explain the impact of HIT usability on user satisfaction, adoption and workarounds in error rates or unintended consequences.

C. Provide alternatives to HIT usability bottlenecks.

VI. HIT System Facilitated Errors

A. Explain the concept of facilitated errors in HIT systems.

B. Cite examples of situations where HIT systems could increase the potential for user error.

C. Analyze sources of HIT system facilitated errors and propose realistic solutions.

VII. HIT System Privacy, Security and Confidentiality

A. Explain and illustrate privacy, security and confidentiality in environments using HIT systems.

B. Identify common threats encountered when using IT systems.

C. Formulate strategies to minimize threats to privacy, security and confidentiality in HIT systems.

VIII. HIT System Planning, Acquisition, Installation and Training

A. Conduct a basic user needs analysis for a given example situation.

B. Create a plan for training users in a small office practice, a large community clinic or a single unit in an ambulatory care setting.

C. Identify potential challenges that may emerge during installation, and generate potential solutions.

IX. Adoption and Installation of an HIT System

A. Identify frequently encountered challenges to adoption and implementation of HIT systems.

B. Design an action plan to address barriers to implementation of HIT systems.

C. Propose solutions to common problems in the implementation of HIT systems.

X. Patient-Centered Care Aspects in HIT

A. Define patient-centered care.

B. Propose HIT-enabled solutions/strategies to enhance patient involvement in health and healthcare.

C. Assess the effectiveness of HIT systems in supporting patient-centered care.

D. Perform self-assessment of personal beliefs related to HIT and patient-centered care.

XI. HIT in the Future

A. Recommend approaches for using HIT to enhance patient-centeredness.

B. Propose strategies to increase patient access to their health information.

C. Suggest alternative designs for HIT for busy/mobile clinicians.

D. Hypothesize how HIT may intersect with publicly available data to improve health.

E. List and predict applications of social networking for health.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 264

  • Title: Configuration and Implementation of Electronic Health Records
  • Number: HCIS 264
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to experience real-world tasks in the role of a configuration/implementation analyst in the health information technology (HIT) workplace. This course focuses on designing and building a system with emphasis placed on implementation and configuration. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the process of migration to an electronic health record (EHR) from organizational strategy, planning, vendor selection and negotiation.
  2. Discuss and perform system configuration.
  3. Integrate and perform creation of orders.
  4. Discuss and perform creation of order sets.
  5. Review and perform creation of data entry templates and reports.
  6. Discuss and perform creation of alerts/notifications and order-check reminders.
  7. Model and perform creation of a health summary document.
  8. Discuss concepts of data infrastructure.
  9. Discuss and analyze key issues of EHR implementation in specific settings.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. EHR Migration

A. Determine appropriate committee members for planning EHR implementation.

B. Develop and apply criteria for selecting an appropriate EHR vendor.

C. Define the steps in a basic strategic management plan.

D. Develop a timeline for choosing and implementing an EHR.

II. System Configuration

A. Develop and apply basic system configuration settings.

B. Produce test evidence of proper system configuration.

C. Mitigate issues with improper system configuration.

III. Orders

A. Build formatted order item.

B. Produce test evidence of a properly built order.

C. Resolve issues with an improperly built order.

IV. Order Sets

A. Build formatted order set.

B. Produce test evidence of a properly built order set.

C. Resolve issues with an improperly built order set.

V. Data Entry Templates

A. Build data entry template.

B. Produce test evidence of a properly built data entry template.

C. Resolve issues with an improperly built data entry template.

VI. Alerts/Notifications and Order Reminders

A. Build new alerts/notifications and reminders.

B. Produce test evidence of a properly built alert/notification and reminder.

C. Resolve issues with an improperly built alert/notification and reminder.

VII. Health Summary Document

A. Build a new health summary.

B. Produce test evidence of a properly built health summary.

C. Resolve issues with an improperly built health summary.

VIII. Data Infrastructure

A. Discuss the concepts of data infrastructure including data architecture, data sets, repositories, data dictionary, data standards and data types.

B. Produce a sample entity relationship diagram with a given case study.

IX. EHR Implementation in Specific Settings

A. Discuss key issues in EHR development and implementation affecting acute care.

B. Discuss key issues in EHR development and implementation affecting long-term care.

C. Discuss key issues in EHR development and implementation affecting ambulatory care.

D. Discuss key issues in EHR development in other healthcare settings including physician practice, home health and hospice, behavioral health and health departments.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total     100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 265

  • Title: Installation and Maintenance of Health IT Systems
  • Number: HCIS 265
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to experience real-world tasks typically performed by an electronic health record (EHR) system administrator or support technician. Topics include testing prior to implementation, system configuration and system support. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Examine system selection criteria regarding software and certification.
  2. Examine system selection criteria regarding functional and technical requirements.
  3. Explain systems analysis and design at a beginning level.
  4. Identify system security procedures and standards.
  5. Develop procedures for system maintenance and upgrades.
  6. Discuss plans for fault-tolerance, backups and decommissioning.
  7. Describe testing strategies and plans.
  8. Discuss pilot-testing and full-scale deployment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Software and Certification Requirements for System Selection

A. Define commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) and in-house/homegrown systems.

1. Identify financial benefits of initial creation, setup, customization, maintenance and integration with existing systems and processes.

2. Identify personnel or consultant costs for creation, customization and maintenance.

3. Estimate cost impact on internal staff, including hiring, training and lost productivity.

4. Identify training costs for developer and users, including development of training resources.

B. Estimate costs and consider advantages and disadvantages of purchasing versus licensing hardware and software.

C. Discuss vendor documentation of system functionality and requirements.

D. Determine system compliance with the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT) certification.

E. Determine whether systems meet "meaningful use" criteria.

F. Compare and rank vendor systems.

G. Evaluate and select system based on requirements and certification needs.

II. Functional and Technical Requirements for System Selection

A. Identify 12 possible steps in choosing an EHR system.

B. Gather functional requirements from institution and users.

C. Document use-cases and relate them to functional requirements.

D. Prioritize functional requirements, including grouping as essential versus desired.

E. Identify minimum and recommended software and hardware requirements.

III. Systems Analysis and Design

A. Discuss aspects of systems analysis and design.

B. Create a project plan for system design and implementation, including data migration and conversion.

IV. System Security Procedure and Standards

A. Identify regulatory requirements, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), for EHRs and integrate into a project plan.

B. Identify best practices for operating system and network system security installation and patches, and integrate into project planning.

C. Discuss training for system users regarding the methods and importance of security compliance.

V. System Maintenance and Upgrades

A. Identify and implement an effective troubleshooting procedure for reporting, evaluating, fixing, deploying and follow-up of errors, problems or limitations for the system.

B. Develop the downtime schedule for maintaining and updating.

C. Develop a process for communicating requirements and supplying updates among vendors, developers and users.

D. Create a baseline for system performance measurement and comparison for troubleshooting.

VI. Fault-Tolerant Systems, Backups and Decommissioning

A. Discuss creating redundant and fault-tolerant systems for access and data storage, thus providing high performance and reliability.

B. Describe backup and restoration of databases, applications and operating systems.

C. Develop a plan for decommissioning systems and data.

VII. Test Strategies and Plans

A. Discuss the gathering of user feedback and developing a performance baseline for system validation and testing.

B. Document problems and resolution status.

C. Create, execute and document a test plan.

VIII. Pilot Testing and Full-Scale Deployment

A. Discuss how to identify a pilot group, and plan scope of a pilot.

B. Discuss installation of a pilot system, training pilot users and making the pilot system available.

C. Discuss process to gather and prioritize feedback from the pilot test and potentially revise project plans.

D. Develop and implement strategies for the following:

1. Communicate deployment plan to end users and management.

2. Technical support of deployment.

3. Feedback from end users following deployment.

4. Usage and capacity of system resources under conditions of full deployment.

E. Discuss deployment of a revised system.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total     100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 267

  • Title: EHR Design, Functionality and Usability
  • Number: HCIS 267
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course discusses human factors associated with designing and implementing health information systems (HIS). Concepts of usability and the effects of new technology and workflow redesign on downstream processes, such as clinical decision support, will be covered. This course provides an overview of the most utilized electronic health systems. System features are evaluated and compared as they would relate to practical deployments. Key factors such as cost, licensing and staffing are also discussed.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe human factors that influence HIS design and usability.
  2. Explain requirements engineering for data gathering and interpretation methods.
  3. Articulate common usability errors in HIS design and the importance and key components of usability evaluation methods.
  4. Summarize the selection, evaluation and certification processes of commercial electronic health records (EHR) systems.
  5. Describe the functionality of EHR system components.
  6. Compare and assess system and database architectures employed by different EHR systems.
  7. Describe vendor strategies for terminology management, knowledge management and data exchange.
  8. Discuss EHR system capabilities and customizability of different EHR systems and principles of usability and design, including data input and information visualization.
  9. Evaluate training and go-live strategies of different EHR vendors in terms of impact on cost, workflow and patient safety.
  10. Discuss mobile computing, context-sensitive applications and medical devices.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Human Factors, Design and Usability

A. Define the concept of cognitive engineering.

B. Describe the representational effect as it applies to human computer interaction and web design.

C. Describe how humans process information and obtain skills.

1. Describe the Gestalt principles of perception and their relevance to human computer interaction and cognitive theory.

2. Describe the processes of memory and their relationship to web design.

3. Describe the cognitive constructs for mental representation.

D. Explain how cognition and human performance models should inform iterative design processes.

E. Distinguish between human factors and human-computer interaction (HCI) as they apply to usability.

F. Explain how cognitive, physical and organization ergonomics are applied to human factors engineering.

G. Describe how mental workload, selective attention and information overload affect usability.

H. Describe the different dimensions of human error.

I. Describe a systems-centered approach to error and patient safety.

J. Evaluate methods for measuring mental workload and information overload.

K. Describe how human factors analysis can be applied to the study of medical devices.

II. Data Gathering and Interpretation Methods Engineering

A. Explain the role of requirements gathering in usability evaluation.

B. Identify the uses, advantages and disadvantages of data collection methods used for requirements gathering.

C. Explain how to conduct a workflow analysis.

D. Identify contextual design principles as they apply to the healthcare setting.

E. Describe the methods to interpret results of data collection.

III. Design and Usability Evaluation Methods

A. Describe the importance of usability in relation to HIS.

B. Evaluate common usability errors in HIS design.

C. Define Quality Improvement (QI) tools used to analyze HIS errors.

D. Describe ways in which HIS facilitates error reporting.

E. Describe usability evaluation methods.

G. Describe the usability testing environment, required equipment, logistics and materials.

IV. Processes of Commercial EHR Systems

A. Describe the most common commercial EHR systems used in ambulatory and inpatient care settings.

B. Describe functions and applications of KLAS ratings available on EHRSystems and apply the KLAS rating system to evaluate software selections for ambulatory and acute care EHRs.

C. Describe and give examples illustrating how Certified Commission for Healthcare Information Technology (CCHIT) criteria are used for certification of EHR systems.

D. State the benefits and stages of "meaningful use" and select illustrative examples in scenarios of EHR system use.

E. Identify the role of governing bodies certifying commercial EHRs, including U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversight, The Joint Commission and National Patient Safety Goals.

F. Demonstrate concept knowledge of the request for proposal (RFP) process.

G. Identify the key stakeholders involved in EHR selection and the roles they each play.

H. Analyze the financial components that strengthen an EHR system vendor with examples of the project costs categories.

I. Identify the key steps in the selection process for choosing an EHR system vendor and provide a summary of inpatient and ambulatory vendors.

V. EHR System Functionality

A. Describe functionality of results review.

B. Describe the functionality of computerized provider order entry (CPOE).

C. Describe the functionality of documentation.

D. Describe the functionality of messaging among different vendor systems.

E. Describe the procedures for billing supported by different EHR systems.

VI. System and Database Architecture in Commercial EHRs

A. Demonstrate concept knowledge of system and database architectures used in commercial EHRs.

B. Describe the HIS landscape, including pharmacy and lab.

C. Compare different EHR operating systems and databases.

D. Explain how database architectures impact performance and extensibility.

E. Articulate how system and database architectures impact security, auditing and performance monitoring.

VII. Vendor Strategies

A. Describe the three types of interoperability.

B. Describe vendor strategies for terminology and knowledge management and how these impact interoperability and data exchange.

C. Describe processes and requirements for exchanging data with personal health records.

VIII. EHR System Design

A. Explain how requirements translate into good design.

B. Compare requirements analysis findings to usability designs.

C. Describe Nielsen's heuristics and design principles.

D. Evaluate whether an interface design exhibits good design principles.

E. Describe the principles of participatory and iterative design.

F. Explain how to design for safety.

G. Differentiate technology input methods given different technology uses, user populations and contexts.

H. Describe how information visualization can support and enhance the representation of trends and aggregate data.

IX. Vendor-Specific Training and Go-Live Strategies

A. Describe characteristics of vendor-specific training and go-live strategies that would facilitate implementation of a new EHR system.

B. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of "big-bang" and phased roll-outs.

C. Identify staffing, command center and on-site consultant considerations in the EHR system vendor selection process.

D. Compare vendor strategies for monitoring system usage and change management.

X. Mobile, Ubiquitous Computing and Medical Devices

A. Describe the role of mobile and ubiquitous computing in healthcare.

B. Define context-sensitive applications.

C. Define the scope of medical devices in healthcare.

D. Describe a human factors approach to the study of devices in healthcare.

E. Compare and contrast examples of medical device usability issues and potential solutions.

F. Explain the role of usability in mobile health devices and communication in healthcare.

G. Evaluate methods of cognitive task analysis to medical devices.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total:100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 270

  • Title: Health Information Systems Internship*
  • Number: HCIS 270
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 90
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 90

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: Enrollment in Health Information Systems (HCIS) coursework and Department approval (It is recommended students complete 10 credit hours of HCIS coursework prior to enrollment.)

Description:

Students will work in an approved training situation under instructional supervision. The internship is designed to give the student the opportunity to use the knowledge and skills acquired in the healthcare information systems (HCIS) courses. An average of 40-60 onsite hours will be required along with class assignments for a total of 90 hrs./semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the company or organization. 

  2. Describe the work activities performed during the internship. 

  3. Demonstrate effective workplace skills. 

  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical behaviors in the work place.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Company or Organization Description
   A. Describe the mission, vision, and goals.
   B. Provide a general outline of the organizational structure.
   C. Describe the roles of employees and workflow of the organization.
   D. Discuss the products and services of the organization.

II. Description of Work Activities
   A. Follow written and oral instructions.
   B. Manage time and resources effectively.
   C. Demonstrate effective written and oral communication.
   D. Participate in meetings and teams as assigned.
   E. Follow employer's rules, regulations and policies.

III. Workplace Skills
   A. Apply technical skills learned in coursework.
   B. Demonstrate analytical and problem solving skills.
   C. Demonstrate acquisition of new knowledge and skills.
   D. Perform industry related tasks as specified by intern supervisors.

IV. Professionalism and Ethics
   A. Demonstrate appropriate business behaviors and attire for assigned area.
   B. Demonstrate interpersonal skills appropriate to a business environment.
   C. Demonstrate and promote ethical standards of practice as per American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).
   D. Demonstrate the principles of privacy, confidentiality and security with health information systems as per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  1. The internship coordinator will evaluate the student based on weekly progress reports as well as a final summative report. 

  2. The employing supervisor will evaluate the student in writing by submitting an evaluation report to the internship coordinator. 

  3. At least two on-site visits will be made by the internship coordinator. An initial visit will establish internship and workplace expectations, and a final visit will discuss outcomes and employer evaluation.

Employer's Evaluation  50-60%
Final Report    10-25%
Weekly Reports    25-40%
                        100%
 

Grade Criteria:

A = 90%
B = 80%
C = 70%
D = 60%
F = <59.5%

Caveats:

  1. Students will be required to attend an orientation in preparation for the internship which will cover the expectations, documentation, and evaluation of the internship experience.
  2. Student may be required to meet specific criteria of the assigned organization which will be at the expense of the student, i.e. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) training, proof of TB test, etc. 
  3. Transportation to the work-site is the responsibility of the student.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 271

  • Title: The Culture of Healthcare
  • Number: HCIS 271
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces students to job expectations in healthcare settings. Topics also include the organization of care inside a practice setting, privacy laws, the changing environment of healthcare delivery, and professional and ethical issues. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss basic terminology related to the culture of healthcare.
  2. Describe the requirements and roles of healthcare personnel.
  3. Compare the major types and functions of different healthcare settings.
  4. Describe the major processes used by clinicians to detect, understand, and prevent or treat diseases.
  5. Explain the key elements and processes involved with evidence-based medicine.
  6. Discuss the nature of nursing care.
  7. Describe how healthcare quality can be measured.
  8. Discuss the role of medical ethics and professional values in healthcare delivery.
  9. Discuss how socio-technical factors impact the healthcare environment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Healthcare Terminology

A. Define basic healthcare terminology.

B. Describe the culture of healthcare, cultural competence and the concept of a ‘just’ culture.

C. Explain cultural competence.

D. Describe the multiple cultures that interact in healthcare delivery.

II. Health Professionals

A. Contrast the different roles and requirements of health professionals.

B. Describe the different support roles.

III. Healthcare Settings

A. Differentiate the range of care-delivery organizations.

B. Analyze the organization of healthcare delivery from the perspective of a continuum of care.

C. Compare the similarities and differences of community hospitals, teaching hospitals and community health clinics.

D. Describe the various departments and services offered by an outpatient clinic, community hospital, academic medical center and long-term care facility.

E. Describe ways in which medical and/or information technology has improved interdepartmental communication and consequently improved the patient experience.

IV. Healthcare Processes

A. Describe the classic paradigm of the clinical process.

B. List the types of information used by clinicians in caring for patients.

C. Describe the steps of managing information during the interaction of clients and patients.

D. List the different information structures used to organize clinical information.

E. Explain what is meant by the hypothetico-deductive reasoning process.

F. Describe the factors that clinicians consider when devising a management plan for a patient's condition.

V. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM)

A. Define the key tenets of EBM and its role in the culture of healthcare.

B. Construct clinical questions and critically appraise evidence in answering them.

C. Describe the critical appraisal of other key clinical questions of diagnosis, harm and prognosis.

D. Discuss the benefits and limitations to summarizing evidence.

E. Describe how to implement EBM in clinical settings and its limitations.

VI. Nursing Care Processes

A. Describe nursing assessment, intervention and judgment.

B. Discuss nursing roles in inpatient, outpatient and long-term care settings.

C. Discuss the role of the nurse in these areas: patient education, medication administration and quality improvement.

D. Discuss invasive procedures performed by nurses.

VII. Quality Measurement in Healthcare

A. Describe the current state of healthcare quality in the United States.

B. Discuss how variations in healthcare can diminish quality.

C. Distinguish among structural, process and outcome measures.

D. Provide examples of quality measures being applied in the current healthcare environment.

VIII. Professional Values and Medical Ethics

A. Define traditions, ethics and values for medical professionals.

B. Describe the role of a professional code of ethics.

C. Compare the professional codes of ethics for nurses and physicians.

D. Compare the professional code of ethics to the legal responsibilities of physicians.

E. Describe the purpose of Medical Practice Acts (MPA's).

F. Apply the tenets of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act's (HIPAA) privacy and security rules in healthcare settings.

G. Discuss bioethical issues and the government agencies dealing with bioethics.

H. Compare and contrast ethical decisions concerning life and death.

I. Discuss the populations that experience gaps in the quality of healthcare received.

J. Discuss economic and regulatory definitions for the rationing of care.

K. Compare and contrast explicit and implicit rationing of care that occurs in the United States.

L. Describe the organizational and technological tools available to protect patient privacy, confidentiality and security.

IX. Socio-Technical Factors

A. Describe medical error and patient safety.

B. Compare and contrast the interaction and interdependence of social and technical elements of resistance to change.

C. Discuss the impact of changing socio-technical processes on quality, efficiency and safety.

D. Discuss the challenges inherent with adapting work processes to new technology.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total     100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 272

  • Title: Terminology in Health Care Settings
  • Number: HCIS 272
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces students to terminology and clinical procedures associated with body systems. It also covers terminology related to health information management (HIM), health information technology (HIT), and public health. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Analyze elements of medical terminology.

  2. Describe terminology related to the body systems and the care of those systems.

  3. Define commonly used terms in public health.

  4. Discuss terms and topics related to HIT, HIM, and electronic health records (EHRs).

  5. Explain standardization of healthcare terminology.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  Medical Terminology Analysis

A. Discuss the four parts of medical terms.

B. Recognize word roots and combining forms.

C. Identify the most common prefixes and suffixes.

D. Define directional and positional terms.

E. Build, divide, spell and pronounce common medical words.

II. Body Systems

A. Define and correctly pronounce medical terms associated with body systems.

B. Describe common diseases and conditions, laboratory and diagnostic procedures, medical and surgical procedures, and medications.

III. Public Health

A. Discuss terms used to define public health.

B. Identify distinguishing features of public health.

C. Discuss terms used to define health.

D. Identify categories and factors that influence health.

E. Identify terms commonly used as measures of health status.

IV. HIT, HIM and EHRs

A. Explain common terms, acronyms and abbreviations used in HIT and HIM.

B. Discuss the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).

C. Describe portions of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009.

D. Identify factors affecting the need for an EHR.

E. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the automated record versus the paper record.

F. Discuss the obstacles to implementation of a paperless record.

G. Discuss the differences among EHRs, electronic medical records (EMRs) and personal health records (PHRs).

H. Define functional requirements of an EHR.

I. Discuss the purpose of EHR components.

J. Describe methods to ensure data security and confidentiality.

K. Identify the hardware and software requirements for EHR implementation.

V. Standardization

A. Discuss the relevance of standardized terminologies to healthcare practice and research.

B. Describe the attributes of a terminology.

C. Identify the difference between classification systems and reference terminologies.

D. Discuss the interest and involvement of the federal government in terminology standards.

E. Identify systems used to classify and document healthcare diagnoses, interventions and outcomes.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
0-20%    Participation/Discussion

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 273

  • Title: Quality Improvement in Healthcare
  • Number: HCIS 273
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces the concepts of health information technology (HIT) and practice workflow redesign as instruments of quality improvement (QI). Students will learn methods to establish a culture that supports increased quality and safety in healthcare. Approaches to assessing patient safety issues and implementing quality management and reporting through electronic systems will be discussed. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss the fundamentals of quality improvement (QI) and health information technology (HIT).
  2. Describe and explain principles of quality and safety for HIT.
  3. Explain the reliability and culture of safety.
  4. Discuss human factors in HIT design and complexity.
  5. Discuss HIT design that supports teamwork and communication.
  6. Describe decision support for QI.
  7. Discuss safe workflow design.
  8. Explain HIT implementation planning that maximizes quality and safety.
  9. Discuss the impact of HIT on patient safety.
  10. Explain and assess HIT design for quality reporting.
  11. Describe data quality and how it can be improved.
  12. Discuss error reporting and analysis.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fundamentals of QI and HIT

A. Identify the current challenges in healthcare quality.

B. Analyze the components of the healthcare system that have an impact on quality.

C. Explain quality and quality improvement (QI) in healthcare.

D. Describe QI as a goal of meaningful use of health information technology (HIT).

E. Analyze the ways that HIT can either help or hinder QI.

II. Principles of Quality and Safety for HIT

A. Describe the fallibility of people and systems in healthcare.

B. Describe the ways that every system is designed to achieve results.

C. Explain basic principles of safe design.

D. Explain the ways that teams make wise decisions with diverse and independent input.

III. Reliability and Culture of Safety

A. Describe how ultrasafe organizations operate.

B. Explain the importance of appropriately expressing perceived safety concerns.

C. Explain strategies to survive in a resistant culture.

IV. Human Factors in HIT Design and Complexity

A. Define human factors and ergonomics.

B. Discuss the role of human factors and ergonomics in patient safety.

V. HIT Design that Supports Teamwork and Communication

A. Assess the impact of teamwork and communication on patient safety and clinical effectiveness.

B. Analyze ways in which HIT design can serve as a barrier to effective communication.

C. Describe ways in which HIT design can enhance teamwork and communication.

VI. Decision Support for QI

A. Define decision support, its importance and why it is difficult to implement.

B. Compare decision-support tools that improve quality.

C. Appraise strategies for successful use of decision-support tools.

D. Analyze the benefits and shortfalls of alerts and clinical reminders.

VII. Safe Workflow Design

A. Assess decision-making requirements in healthcare.

B. Construct a work process flowchart.

C. Define ways of incorporating decision-making requirements into HIT design.

VIII. HIT Implementation Planning that Maximizes Quality and Safety

A. Critique an implementation team and the roles they play in ensuring quality.

B. Analyze effective implementation planning.

C. Assess the quality implications of big bang versus staggered approaches.

D. Explain go-live support strategies that minimize risk.

IX. HIT Impact on Patient Safety

A. Discuss the success of a simple checklist in improving central line bloodstream infections.

B. Identify strategies for adaptive work that can be useful to HIT initiatives.

X. HIT Design for Quality Reporting

A. Explain the attributes of an effective reporting system.

B. Appraise the importance of standardized and structured health information.

C. Describe how HIT facilitates data collection and reporting for improving quality and safety.

XI. Data Quality Improvement

A. Discuss the impact of poor data quality on quality measurement.

B. Identify 10 attributes of data quality and key process recommendations.

C. Discuss common causes of data insufficiency.

D. Describe how HIT design can enhance data quality.

XII. Error Reporting and Analysis

A. Describe ways in which HIT facilitates error detection and reporting.

B. Explain how reporting errors helps identify HIT issues.

C. Assess HIT for unintended negative consequences.

D. Examine common themes in HIT design deficiencies.

E. Utilize QI tools to analyze HIT errors.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total     100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 274

  • Title: Healthcare Workflow Analysis and Redesign
  • Number: HCIS 274
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces healthcare workflow analysis and redesign as a necessary component of complete practice automation. The topics of process validation and change management are also covered. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss foundational elements of workflow analysis and process redesign.
  2. Analyze different forms of flowcharts and diagrams.
  3. Analyze process diagrams and utilize appropriate symbols.
  4. Discuss methods to facilitate the gathering of information necessary to analyze and redesign processes.
  5. Explain the key aspects of process analysis leading to identification of desired electronic health record functionality.
  6. Describe elements of and methods for process redesign.
  7. Discuss skills and methods needed to facilitate decision-making meetings for process optimization.
  8. Discuss the fundamentals of and tools for quality improvement (QI) in healthcare.
  9. Explain how to best facilitate and manage change.
  10. Discuss how to best implement, communicate and evaluate process change.
  11. Describe how to sustain QI and assess plans for sustainability.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Elements of Workflow Analysis and Process Redesign

A. Describe the purpose for process analysis and redesign in the clinical setting.

B. Describe the role of a workflow process analyst and redesign specialist, and contrast it with other roles such as technical support and implementation management.

C. Explain how health process analysis and redesign is related to meaningful use.

D. Analyze a healthcare scenario and identify the components of clinical workflow.

E. Analyze the responsibilities of each participant in the redesign process and how the roles complement or overlap with one another.

F. Describe how the workflow processes might differ based on the type of healthcare facility.

II. Flowcharts and Diagrams

A. Articulate the value of process mapping.

B. Describe standard process mapping symbols and conventions.

C. Analyze an existing workflow process chart in terms of the information that could be generated and the sequence of steps that are being communicated.

D. Choose the correct scope and detail level for a process map.

E. Identify an appropriate process mapping methodology.

F. Analyze a process map for a healthcare system or component using correct symbols and conventions.

III. Process Diagrams and Symbols

A. Analyze context and data flow diagrams for a healthcare system or component using appropriate Yourdon symbols and conventions.

B. Identify a process flowchart for a healthcare system or component using appropriate International Standards Organization (ISO) 5807 symbols and conventions.

C. Identify the correct scope and detail level for a process flowchart and data flow diagram.

D. Analyze key types of diagrams.

IV. Methods to Gather Information

A. Identify how the strategic goals and stakeholders for a given healthcare facility can influence workflow processes in that facility.

B. Evaluate an agenda for an opening meeting to discuss workflow processes in a healthcare facility.

C. Compare different types of knowledge and their impact on organizations.

D. Analyze a healthcare scenario according to Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) levels.

E. Identify the healthcare system workflow to best streamline healthcare operations.

F. Identify key individuals whom an analyst should meet or observe in order to gain an understanding of the nature and complexity of their work.

G. Develop questions to facilitate a productive discussion of the information workflow, activities and roles within the facility.

H. Describe ways to successfully overcome common challenges encountered in knowledge acquisition.

I. Explain how to choose an appropriate knowledge acquisition method.

J. Draft a summary report from diagrams and observations in an information-gathering meeting.

V. Process Analysis

A. Describe the purpose of process analysis.

B. Describe skills and knowledge necessary for process analysis.

C. Evaluate a process analysis for a given clinic scenario.

D. Create a draft summary report based on the results of a process analysis.

E. Identify desired electronic medical record functionality based on the results of a process analysis.

VI. Process Redesign

A. Describe the purpose, skills and knowledge necessary for process redesign.

B. Identify common process problems in healthcare that result in increased cost, decreased safety and lack of efficacy.

C. Describe how meaningful use of information technology in healthcare compensates for human weaknesses and leverages the strengths of technology.

D. Choose an appropriate human-machine division of tasks for a given clinical scenario.

E. Enhance clinical workflow by applying process redesign strategies to common process problems.

F. Use knowledge of common software functionality to inform a process redesign for a given clinical scenario.

VII. Process Optimization Decisions

A. Discuss the process of planning and conducting a decision-making meeting.

B. Discuss how to communicate findings of a workflow process analysis to healthcare facility decision-makers.

C. Evaluate the results of decisions made and actions identified during an optimization meeting.

VIII. QI Methods

A. Describe strategies of quality improvement (QI) and the role of leadership in QI.

B. Describe opportunities for clinical improvement.

C. Describe and recommend tools for QI.

D. Compare quality improvement methodologies and tools, and define appropriate uses in healthcare.

IX. Change Management

A. Describe how concerns expressed by participants in a process analysis meeting may facilitate or impede proposed changes in workflow processes.

B. Describe strategies a workflow analyst can use to gain acceptance for proposed workflow process changes.

C. Identify appropriate change facilitation tools.

D. Evaluate a change facilitation plan.

E. Analyze various process change implementation strategies for a given healthcare facility.

X. Process Change Implementation and Evaluation

A. Evaluate a process change implementation plan for a healthcare facility to identify management tracking and measurement opportunities.

B. Develop a communication process change plan.

C. Evaluate a recently implemented process.

XI. Quality Improvement Sustainability

A. Describe control strategies for clinical processes.

B. Discuss how to create a sustainable and continuous improvement plan.

C. Describe a set of contingency plans to keep the practice running if the electronic health record system fails.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total     100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 275

  • Title: Health Information Systems
  • Number: HCIS 275
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course addresses concepts of information systems specific to healthcare and public health applications. Students will be introduced to health information technology (HIT) standards, health-related data structures, software applications and enterprise information architecture in healthcare and public health organizations. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Summarize the field of health informatics and the task of health informaticians.
  2. Describe hardware and software as it relates to healthcare.
  3. Describe an electronic health record (EHR) and its impact on healthcare.
  4. Discuss computerized provider order entry (CPOE) and its impact on healthcare.
  5. Describe clinical decision support (CDS) systems and their impact on healthcare.
  6. Explain patient monitoring systems and their impact on healthcare.
  7. Describe medical imaging systems and their impact on healthcare.
  8. Discuss consumer health informatics.
  9. Describe the integration and impact of administrative, billing and financial systems.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Health Informatics

A. Define information management, information technology, and informatics.

B. Explain the basic theoretical concept that underlies informatics practice.

C. Define the meaning of health informatics as a field of study.

D. Describe areas where health informatics may be applied.

E. Identify trends and drivers of health informatics.

F. State the roles and skills of professional health informaticians.

G. Explain how health informaticians process data into information and knowledge to support healthcare tasks that improve patient care.

II. Hardware and Software

A. Describe the major hardware components of a computer and major types of software used in computer systems.

B. Describe the major types of network configurations.

C. Define the concept of an information system in general and characteristics of an information system and a health information system in particular.

D. Describe the different types of information systems in terms of their ability to support the requirements of a healthcare enterprise.

E. Describe various types of technologies that suppport health information systems.

F. Examine the challenges presented by emerging trends in information technology, social media and global communication.

G. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of using the Internet as a platform for healthcare applications.

III. EHRs

A. State the similarities and differences between an electronic medical record (EMR) and an electronic health record (EHR).

B. Identify attributes and functions of an EHR.

C. Describe the perspectives of healthcare providers and the public regarding acceptance of or issues with an EHR.

D. Explain how the use of an EHR can affect patient care safety, efficiency of care practices and patient outcomes.

E. Discuss how health information exchanges (HIEs) and the Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN) impact healthcare delivery and the practice of healthcare providers.

F. Outline issues regarding governmental regulation of EHR systems such as meaningful use and qualified EHRs.

G. Summarize how the Institute of Medicine's Vision for 21st Century Health Care and Wellness may impact health information systems.

H. Identify how ongoing developments in health informatics can affect future uses and challenges related to health information systems.

IV. CPOE

A. Describe the purpose, attributes and functions of CPOE.

B. Explain ways in which CPOE is currently being used in healthcare.

C. Discuss the major advantage of CPOE adoption.

D. Identify common barriers to CPOE adoption.

E. Identify how CPOE can affect patient care safety, quality, efficiency and outcomes.

V. CDS Systems

A. Describe the history and evolution of CDS.

B. Describe the fundamental requirements of a CDS system.

C. Discuss the importance of clinical practice guidelines and evidence-based practices and how these affect CDS systems.

D. Describe the challenges and barriers to building and using CDS systems.

E. Discuss the legal and regulatory barriers in the distribution of CDS systems.

F. Identify future directions for CDS systems.

VI. Patient Monitoring Systems

A. Describe the purpose, attributes and functions of patient monitoring systems.

B. Discuss the primary applications and how automation can improve the quality of patient care.

C. Analyze how the integration of data from many sources assists in medical decision making.

D. Discuss how telehealth supports clinical care.

E. Discuss the effectiveness and economic benefits of telehealth.

F. Examine the role of smart technology and links to health information systems.

VII. Medical Imaging Systems

A. Examine the purposes, processes and management issues related to the use of imaging systems in healthcare.

B. Explain the economic and technological factors that must be considered in the adoption of digital displays by radiology departments.

C. Describe the major challenges with imaging systems faced by healthcare institutions and informaticians.

D. Describe the future of imaging systems.

VIII. Consumer Health Informatics

A. Describe the emergence of personal health records and their implications for patients, healthcare providers and health systems.

B. Discuss the benefits and challenges of consumerism in the ongoing development and use of health information systems.

C. Explain how current and emerging technologies, including the Internet, have impacted and may continue to affect consumer health informatics.

D. Describe the role of genomics in consumer health informatics.

IX. Administrative, Billing and Financial Systems

A. Describe the strategies used by healthcare organizations to ensure integration of front-end clinical data collection and back-end billing functions.

B. Discuss the critical requirements needed in integrated billing, financial and clinical systems.

C. Explain how automation tools (such as scheduling system support tools) are being integrated with health information systems.

D. Describe the core elements of a master patient index and the current trends in establishing a national or universal patient identifier.

E. Discuss data analysis and trends, especially as related to the improvement of patient care.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
0-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 277

  • Title: Training and Instructional Design
  • Number: HCIS 277
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course provides participants with essential knowledge and skills to deliver training to adult learners implementing electronic health records (EHRs) in a variety of healthcare settings. The Instructional Systems Design (ISD) model, which includes analysis of the learner and learning environment, design and development of customized education, implementation of the training plan and evaluation of the training program's effectiveness, will be used. 2 hrs lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe fundamental characteristics of the EHR training environment.
  2. Discuss conducting a needs assessment and analyzing learners and environment.
  3. Design education plans according to the ADDIE (analyze, design, development, implement and evaluate) ISD model.
  4. Develop educational materials using a variety of instructional tools and strategies.
  5. Describe the training implementation plan.
  6. Design evaluations that measure training program quality.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The EHR Training Environment

A. Discuss the role and competencies of a trainer.

B. Explain why people resist change and discuss methods to overcome resistance.

C. Select strategies to facilitate change based on analysis of the learners and environment.

D. Define the levels of learning per Bloom’s Taxonomy.

E. Describe the characteristics of adult learners that impact training design.

II. Needs Assessment and Analysis

A. Discuss the recommended training cycle of the ADDIE ISD model

B. Identify instructional design problems for a variety of learners and training settings.

C. List a range of data collection methods for conducting needs assessments in healthcare settings.

D. Analyze learner, task and situational characteristics.

E. Describe the special training needs and constraints in a healthcare setting.

III. Educational Design

A. Construct lesson plans using appropriate instructional methods and approaches.

B. Write measurable goals for a training program which meet the specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely (SMART) criteria.

C. Write specific level learning objectives based on Bloom’s Taxonomy.

D. Select content for development based on the objectives and lesson plan.

E. Identify the appropriate instructional approaches established by the needs analysis.

IV. Educational Materials Development

A. Choose appropriate instructional media for a given lesson plan.

B. Create customized written materials utilizing principles of instructional design.

C. Create an effective PowerPoint presentation utilizing evidence-based design principles.

D. Create and customize content using appropriate activities for training objectives.

E. Discuss methods for continuing education and training utilizing various technologies.

V. Training Implementation

A. Discuss components of successful EHR training implementation.

B. Select super-users based on recommended criteria.

C. Describe the components of a super-user training program.

D. Explain strategies for training implementation.

E. Demonstrate effective presentation skills using a variety of instructional tools and strategies.

VI. Training Evaluation

A. Design assessment instruments and procedures aligned with instructional goals/objectives.

B. Administer assessments as a component of training/instructional design.

C. Design a program evaluation tool that objectively measures a training program.

D. Discuss how data collection is analyzed and supports program improvement.

E. Specify revisions to training based on evaluations results.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Assignments and Projects
10-20%    Discussion
30-50%    Quizzes/Tests

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 292

  • Title: Special Topics:
  • Number: HCIS 292
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 2
  • Contact Hours: 1 - 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 1 - 2

Description:

This course periodically presents specialized topics in Health Information Systems (HIS) that are not available in the regularly offered curriculum. Special Topics may be repeated for credit, but only on different topics.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use appropriate terminology related to the special topic.
  2. Solve problems by using content related to the special topic.
  3. Demonstrate conceptual understanding of the special topic.
  4. Use software related to the special topic.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Will vary within the guidelines of the educational affairs committee.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Will vary within the guidelines of the educational affairs committee.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Varies

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).