Geoscience (GEOS)

Courses

GEOS 130   General Geology (5 Hours)  

In this introductory course the students will survey the geologic processes that form and shape the earth over geologic time using the models of the rock cycle, the hydrologic cycle and the tectonic cycle. In the laboratory they will conduct hands-on activities designed to enhance and reinforce the geologic concepts they have studied. 4 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

GEOS 130H   HON: General Geology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

GEOS 140   Physical Geography (3 Hours)

This course is a survey of the physical and environmental topics of geography, including the methods used to study them. The Earth as a system and the subsystems of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere constitute the major units of study. Students will acquire basic terminology that they will use to explain the earth, the atmosphere, the landscape, and the processes that occur on earth to change the landscape. Topics may include mapping with topographic maps and remote sensing; development and structure of the atmosphere; weather; water resources; climate; rock formation; mountain building; chemical and physical weathering; mass movement; soil formation; erosion, transportation and deposition by running water, wind, ice, currents, waves and tides; and the foundation that these processes build for the biosphere on earth. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

GEOS 140H   HON: Physical Geography* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

GEOS 141   Physical Geography Lab* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: GEOS 140 or the equivalent.

Students in this course will practice their knowledge of physical geography through the collection and analysis of atmospheric data and the identification and interpretation of landforms and biological patterns as depicted on topographic maps and remotely sensed imagery. 4 hrs. lab/wk.

GEOS 145   World Regional Geography (3 Hours)  

In this introductory course, the student will first review the basic theories of the discipline of geography, the relationship of world population and resources and the factors affecting development. Next, the student will survey the major regions of the world to identify each region's distinguishing geographic characteristics, summarize its past development and explain the key issues affecting the region's future development. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

GEOS 145H   HON: World Regional Geography* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

GEOS 214   Introduction to Teaching Math and Science I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MATH 171 with a grade of "C" or higher OR appropriate score on the math placement test OR department approval.

This course allows math and science students to explore and develop an appreciation for teaching as a career. To support their learning, students will be introduced to the theory and practice that is necessary to design and deliver quality instruction. They will plan and implement lessons of an inquiry-based curriculum in an elementary classroom during the semester. MATH 214, ASTR 214, BIOL 214, CHEM 214, GEOS 214, PHYS 214 and PSCI 214 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

GEOS 215   Introduction to Teaching Math and Science II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: ASTR 214 or BIOL 214 or CHEM 214 or GEOS 214 or MATH 214 or PHYS 214 or PSCI 214 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Students learn about the middle school environment and work on math and science inquiry-based lesson analysis, design and assessment. Student partners will plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons in a middle school. The course emphasizes writing 5E lesson plans with a focus on the importance of using appropriate questioning and assessment strategies throughout the lesson, as well as how to analyze and modify a lesson based on personal reflections and observer feedback. By the completion of the course, students should be able to reflect on their personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science, and develop a feasible pathway to a career in teaching. MATH 215, ASTR 215, BIOL 215, CHEM 215, GEOS 215, PHYS 215 and PSCI 215 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

GEOS 130

  • Title: General Geology
  • Number: GEOS 130
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 4
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

In this introductory course the students will survey the geologic processes that form and shape the earth over geologic time using the models of the rock cycle, the hydrologic cycle and the tectonic cycle. In the laboratory they will conduct hands-on activities designed to enhance and reinforce the geologic concepts they have studied. 4 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Review the development of geology as a science.
  2. Describe the characteristics of the primary minerals comprising rocks.
  3. Explain the origin and modification of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks in terms of the rock cycle.
  4. Explain the basis for relative and absolute dating of rocks.
  5. Describe the dynamic characteristics of mass wasting and the agents of erosion and identify the effects these agents have on the land surface.
  6. Identify the processes responsible for crustal deformation and the types of structures these processes produce.
  7. Explain the phenomenon known as an earthquake and how geologists quantify the energy released and the destruction produced.
  8. Develop a model of the Earth’s interior based upon seismic data.
  9. Describe the plate tectonics theory and identify the data that led to the theory.
  10. Describe the distinguishing characteristics of the ocean’s floor and the continents and explain them in terms of plate tectonic theory.
  11. Identify the major resource groups and the processes responsible for their formation
  12. Read and interpret topographic maps. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to General Geology

A. Development of geology as a science

1. Distinguish between physical, historical and environmental geology.

2. Contrast catastrophism and uniformitarianism.

3. Describe the contributions of Hutton, Playfair and Lyell to geology.

4. Describe the nature of scientific inquiry in terms of its basic assumptions and components: observation, hypothesis and theory.

B. Basic concepts of geology

1. Outline the nebular hypothesis explaining the origin of the Earth.

2. List and identify the four main spheres of the Earth’s environment.

3. Name and describe the structural subdivisions of the Earth’s interior.

4. Identify the major submarine features of the ocean’s floor.

5. Outline the Plate Tectonics theory.

6. Sketch separate diagrams of the rock cycle and of the hydrologic cycle and relate them to the plate tectonics model.

II. The Earth’s Composition and the Rock Cycle

A. Matter and minerals

1. Define a mineral.

2. Explain the bases for mineral composition.

3. Identify the common minerals in each major chemical group using their physical properties.

4. List and distinguish among the common silicate minerals.

B. Plutonic igneous rocks

1. Contrast magma and lava.

2. Describe the process responsible for the textures of igneous rocks.

3. List the fine igneous rock textures and explain the origin of each.

4. Discuss the contribution of N.L. Bowen to the explanation of the formation and compositions of igneous rocks.

5. Contrast granitic, audesitic, basaltic and ultramafic compositional groups.

6. Identify igneous rocks based on their texture and mineral composition.

7. Explain the origin of magma.

8. Explain the concept of partial melting.

9. Contrast plutons in terms of size and relationship to the surrounding host-rock.

C. Volcanic igneous rocks

1. Describe the nature of volcanic eruptions.

2. Describe the types of materials erupted from volcanoes.

3. Contrast the types of volcanic landforms eruptions produced.

4. Relate igneous activity to plate tectonics.

5. Describe the potential impact of volcanic eruptions on climate.

D. Weathering and soil development

1. Briefly contrast weathering, erosion and mass wasting.

2. Contrast physical and chemical weathering.

3. Describe the physical and chemical weathering processes in terms of mechanisms and products.

4. Explain how climate and rock characteristics determine the rate of weathering.

5. Explain how parent material, time, climate, organic activity and slope influence soil development.

6. Sketch and label the soil horizons on the three general types of soil profiles: pedalfer, pedocal and laterite.

7. Describe human impacts on soil productivity.

E. Sediments and sedimentary rocks

1. Relate the products of weathering to the development of sediment.

2. Describe the processes that alter sediment into sedimentary rock.

3. Contrast the three main groups of sedimentary rocks in terms of texture and composition.

4. Identify the structures unique to sedimentary rocks.

5. Identify the principal sedimentary rocks from their physical properties.

F. Metamorphism and metamorphic rocks

1. Describe the effects of heat, pressure and chemically active fluids on rocks.

2. Describe the conditions for contact, regional and fault-zone metamorphism.

3. Define index minerals and describe their use in interpretation of metamorphic landscapes.

4. Identify the primary metamorphic rocks based on their texture, composition and appearance.

III. Mass Movement and Erosional Agents

A. Mass wasting

1. Explain the reasons for mass movements.

2. Classify mass movements based on type of material, rate of movement and type of movement.

B. Running water

1. Describe the factors that affect infiltration capacity.

2. Describe the flow of water from precipitation to the ocean.

3. Describe how a stream erodes, transports and deposits materials and the features it forms in the process.

4. Sketch dendritic, radial, rectangular and trellis drainage patterns and identify the stratigraphy and structure typically related to each pattern.

5. Explain how urbanization affects stream discharge and flooding.

6. Interpret fluvial features on topographic maps.

C. Groundwater

1. Diagram the distribution of water beneath the surface.

2. Identify the factors affecting groundwater movement.

3. Contrast confined and unconfined aquifers.

4. Discuss problems associated with groundwater withdrawal.

5. Describe how groundwater erodes, transports and deposits materials and the features formed in the process.

6. Interpret the features associated with groundwater on topographic maps.

D. Glaciers

1. Explain how glacial ice forms, moves and wastes away.

2. Describe how a glacier erodes, transports and deposits materials and the features formed in the process.

3. Discuss the glacial theory of the ice age.

4. Identify the indirect effects of glaciation.

5. Describe the causes of glaciation.

6. Interpret the features associated with glaciation on topographic maps.

E. Wind

1. Explain the reasons for the distribution of deserts.

2. Describe geologic processes of weathering and erosion in dry climates.

3. Describe how wind erodes, transports and deposits materials and identify the features it forms in the process.

4. Interpret the features associated with wind on topographic maps./p>

F. Shorelines

1. Discuss the formation of waves in bodies of water.

2. List the distinguishing characteristics of waves.

3. Describe the circumstances that cause a wave to break near shore.

4. Describe how waves erode, transport and deposit materials and the features they form in the process.

5. Describe the effect of rising and falling sea levels on shorelines.

6. Explain the distribution and causes of tides.

7. Interpret shoreline features on topographic maps

IV. The Tectonic Cycle

A. Crustal deformation

1. Identify the types of stresses that deform rock.

2. Identify the types of deformation each type of stress produces.

3. Relate stress and strain to types of crustal deformation.

4. Define strike and dip.

5. Describe the distinguishing characteristics of folds, faults and joints.

6. Recognize the type of geologic structure from its outcrop pattern and determine its subsurface configuration.

B. Earthquakes

1. Explain why earthquakes occur.

2. Describe what happens when an earthquake occurs.

3. Describe the worldwide distribution.

4. Explain the Richter and Modified Mercalli scales of earthquake magnitude and intensity.

5. Explain the factors that influence earthquake destructiveness.

6. Discuss the methods for short and long-term earthquake prediction.

7. Locate the epicenter and determine the time of origin of an earthquake using arrival-time data.

C. Modeling the Earth’s interior

1. Describe the nature of seismic waves.

2. Develop a model of the Earth’s interior based on an analysis of seismic waves traveling through the Earth.

3. Identify the compositional and mechanical layers of the Earth and describe their distinguishing characteristics.

4. Explain the basis for the Moho, the Gutenberg Discontinuity and the outer-inner core boundary.

5. Discuss the current hypothesis of the origin of the Earth’s magnetic field.

D. Plate tectonics

1. Describe the data Alfred Wegener used to develop his hypothesis of continental drift.

2. Discuss the new date that caused scientists to reconsider continental drift.

3. Describe the Plate Tectonics model and the five types of plate boundaries.

4. Identify the features associated with each type of boundary.

5. Identify and discuss the three proposed driving mechanisms of the tectonic cycle.

6. Identify the type of plate boundary from a set of data.

E. The ocean floor

1. Describe the method for mapping the ocean floor.

2. Draw a crossection of the ocean floor from the Mid-Atlantic ridge to the Lunar DeFuca trench showing the major features of the sea floor.

3. Relate the features of the ocean floor to the plate tectonics model.

4. Determine from measurements the rate of sea floor spreading.

5. Identify the stages of atoll development from field data.

F. Mountain building and the evolution of the continents

1. Describe the geographic features of the continent.

2. Explain the concept of isostasy and its relation to the continental mountain belts.

3. Describe the type of orogenesis occurring along the three types of convergent boundaries.

4. Contrast the early evolution and gradual evolution proposals for development of the continents.

V. Geologic Time

A. Relative dating of rocks

1. Distinguish between absolute and relative dating.

2. Describe the principles of relative dating.

3. Explain the concept of correlation.

4. Describe the geologic time-scale/p>

B. Absolute or radiometric dating of rocks

1. Define radioactivity.

2. List and briefly describe alpha and beta emissions and electron capture.

3. Explain how radioactive decay is used to determine the ages of rocks.

4. Identify the difficulties in dating rocks.

VI. Earth’s Resources

A. Basic concepts

1. Define renewable and non-renewable resources.

2. Describe the growth of population over the last 2,000 years.

3. Identify the factors affecting resource availability.

4. Discuss the future availability of resources.

B. Energy resources

1. Identify the major energy resources.

2. Identify the major environmental effects from each resource.

3. Identify and determine the feasibility of alternate energy resources.

C. Mineral resources

1. Identify the geologic processes responsible for metallic mineral resources.

2. Identify the geologic processes responsible for non-metallic mineral resources.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

The grade for the course will be determined by the student’s performance on lecture exams, lab exams and lab exercises.  A total of 1,200 points is possible for the course.  Grades are determined as follows:
Points for various parts of the course are:
50%   Exams
8%     Final
4%     Article Summaries
25%   Lab Exams
13%   Lab Exercises

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

Grade Criteria Minimum Points Required

A 1080 (90%)
B 960 (80%)
C 840 (70%)
D 720 (60%)
F Less than 719 (59%)

Caveats:

Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

GEOS 130H

No information found.

GEOS 140

  • Title: Physical Geography
  • Number: GEOS 140
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is a survey of the physical and environmental topics of geography, including the methods used to study them. The Earth as a system and the subsystems of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere constitute the major units of study. Students will acquire basic terminology that they will use to explain the earth, the atmosphere, the landscape, and the processes that occur on earth to change the landscape. Topics may include mapping with topographic maps and remote sensing; development and structure of the atmosphere; weather; water resources; climate; rock formation; mountain building; chemical and physical weathering; mass movement; soil formation; erosion, transportation and deposition by running water, wind, ice, currents, waves and tides; and the foundation that these processes build for the biosphere on earth. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the environmental spheres of the Earth and explain the dynamic processes functioning within them and the interactions between them.
  2. Explain the basic building blocks of matter and the nature of energy and its transformations.
  3. Draw the structure of the atmosphere and characterize each part.
  4. Describe the pathways that energy takes through the atmosphere.
  5. Describe the temperature controls and patterns on the Earth.
  6. Explain the forces that drive air and water circulation and describe the patterns of air and water circulation on the Earth.
  7. Describe the occurrence and properties of atmospheric moisture and its relationship to weather.
  8. Explain the causes of weather, particularly condensation and precipitation.
  9. Sketch the hydrologic cycle and explain each part in terms of its characteristics, dynamics and effects on the Earth.
  10. Classify climates and identify and explain their distribution on the Earth.
  11. Describe the parts of the Earth, identify the major rock products of the Earth's lithosphere and describe the processes that allow for change between them.
  12. Relate the processes of volcanism and earthquakes to tectonics.
  13. Describe the weathering processes that change rock in place and the mass movement of weathered rock material by gravity.
  14. Explain how soils form and describe their major horizons, properties and distribution.
  15. Describe the fluvial processes of erosion, transportation and deposition, and the features they produce, including stream patterns, channel and valley landforms, and the effect of human alteration of the floodplain.
  16. Describe the eolian processes of erosion, transportation and deposition, and the features they produce including landforms in desert environments formed by wind and running water.
  17. Describe the processes of erosion, transportation and deposition by waves, currents and tides as they construct and deconstruct coastal landforms along erosional and depositional coastlines. Discuss the effect of human occupation on coastal landscapes.
  18. Describe the glacial processes of erosion, transportation and deposition, and identify and define the alpine and continental landforms that result.
  19. Describe the abiotic and biotic components and operations within the ecosystem.
  20. Identify, define and locate the terrestrial biomes.
  21. Relate human impacts to these biomes and to the Earth. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Environmental Spheres of the Earth
   A. Describe the four spheres of the Earth.
   B. Define System Theory and explain how it applies to the Earth.
   C. Explain the uses of remote sensing and geographic information
systems to the study of physical geography.
   D. Explain Earth’s reference grid.

II. Matter, Energy and Earth
   A. Explain the origin, formation and development of Earth and the
atmosphere.
   B. Describe the Sun’s operation and explain the characteristics of
the solar wind and the electromagnetic spectrum of radiant energy.
   C. Portray the intercepted solar energy and its uneven distribution on
Earth.
   D. Explain the reasons for Earth’s seasonality.

III. Structure of the Earth’s Atmosphere
   A. Compare and contrast the zones of the atmosphere according to
composition, temperature and function.
   B. Discuss the types and causes of natural and anthropogenic
pollution.
   C. Describe how ozone is broken down in the stratosphere.

IV. Energy’s Pathways
   A. Identify and define the pathways of solar energy: transmission,
refraction, reflection, scattering, conduction, convection and advection.
   B. Analyze the effects of clouds on solar radiation received at
Earth’s surface.
   C. Describe the microclimatology of urban areas compared to rural
areas.

V. Global Temperatures
   A. Explain how latitude, altitude, cloud cover and land-water heating
differences control temperatures.
   B. Interpret temperature patterns for various locations using isotherm
maps.
   C. Explain the effects of temperature extremes on humans.

VI. Global Circulation within the Atmosphere and the Oceans
   A. Define wind and describe how it is measured.
   B. Define air pressure and locate the air pressure zones in the Earth.
   C. Explain the driving forces on circulation.
   D. Describe upper air circulation and local surface winds.
   E. Describe the pattern of Earth’s surface and deep ocean currents.

VII. Atmospheric Moisture
   A. Describe the origin and occurrences of water on the Earth.
   B. Explain the heat properties of water and explain how water changes
from a solid to a liquid and to a gas.
   C. Define relative humidity and explain how it is related to
temperature.
   D. Define atmospheric stability and describe the changes that take
place in an ascending or descending air mass.

VIII. Weather
   A. Identify the requirements for cloud formation and classify clouds.
   B. Identify types of fog and explain the conditions that lead to their
formation.
   C. Describe the air masses and their source regions affecting North
America. 
   D. Compare and contrast the types of atmospheric lifting mechanisms.
   E. Describe the formation of violent weather (mesocyclones and
tornadoes, mid-latitude cyclones, northeasters and hurricanes).

IX. Hydrologic Cycle
   A. Sketch and label the hydrologic cycle.
   B. Relate the importance of the water-budget concept to soil moisture.
   C. Describe the nature of groundwater and define the characteristics
necessary for an aquifer.
   D. Identify and discuss problems related to the overuse of
groundwater.
   E. Explain how stream discharge is measured and how it varies in a
downstream direction.
    
X. Climate Systems
   A. Define climate and explain the difference between climate and
weather.
   B. List the factors used to classify climates in the Koppen System.
   C. Describe the A, B, C, D, E and H climate categories and locate these
regions on a world map.
   D. Interpret a climograph. 
   E. Explain the El Nino and La Nina patterns.
   F. Outline future climate patterns and explain causes and potential
consequences.

XI. Earth and the Rock Cycle
   A. Diagram Earth’s interior in cross-section and describe each
layer.
   B. Compare and contrast Catastrophism and Uniformitarianism.
   C. Sketch the rock cycle and relate the processes to the rock types
they produce.
   D. Describe the contributions of Wegener (Continental Drift) and Hess
(Sea-floor Spreading) to the development of Plate Tectonic Theory.
   E. List and describe the types of plate boundaries.
   F. Outline the formation and breakup of Pangea.

XII. Tectonics
   A. Define the stresses that deform crust.
   B. Explain what causes folding and draw and define the types of folds.
   C. Explain what causes faulting and draw and define the types of
faults.
   D. Relate the types of plate boundaries to mountain building and
identify an example of each.
   E. Explain the nature of earthquakes, their measurement and their
relationship to plate boundaries.
   F. Compare and contrast an effusive volcanic eruption with an explosive
volcanic eruption and describe the related landforms, using a specific
example of each.

XIII. Weathering and Mass Movement
   A. Define weathering and explain the importance of parent rock,
structure, climate and topography in determining rates of weathering.
   B. Describe frost action, crystallization, hydration and
pressure-release jointing as physical weathering processes.
   C. Describe hydrolysis, oxidation, carbonation and solution as chemical
weathering processes.
   D. Describe the processes and landforms associated with karst
topography.
   E. Use the dynamic equilibrium model and the concept of a geomorphic
threshold to explain a mass movement.
   F. Classify mass movements and determine possible triggers of these
hazards.

XIV. Soil Geography
   A. Describe the properties used to define soil horizons.
   B. Diagram and define the soil horizons found in a typical soil
profile.
   C. List the factors affecting soil formation.
   D. Describe the soil orders and explain their general locations on the
Earth.

XV. Fluvial Processes and Landforms
   A. Describe the fluvial processes of erosion, transportation and
deposition.
   B. Identify stream patterns and determine the underlying cause for
each.
   C. Define base level.
   D. Draw a map view of a meandering channel and label the point bar,
cutbank and cutoff and explain how stream gradient changes when a cutoff
occurs.
   E. Identify and define the landforms associated with a stream channel,
a stream valley and delta types.
   F. Describe the relationships between velocity, depth, width and
discharge of a stream.
   G. Describe the efforts humans have made to control rivers and discuss
the effects of urbanization on the floodplain.

XVI. Eolian Processes and Landforms  
   A. Describe how the wind erodes, transports and deposits material.
   B. Identify and describe the types of sand dunes and the wind direction
that produced each.
   C. Define loess and describe its occurrence in an arid environment.
   D. Discuss the role of running water as a builder of desert landforms
such as the alluvial fan and as an eroder of desert landforms such as the
butte and mesa.
   E. Discuss the origin of the Basin and Range Province.
   F. Discuss the effects of damming a river in an arid environment in
relationship to water availability.

XVII. Coastal Processes and Landforms
   A. Describe the chemical composition of seawater and the  physical
structure of the ocean.
   B. Describe wave motion at sea and near shore and explain how wave
refraction affects the coastline.
   C. Explain how a longshore current forms and how it moves sediment.
   D. Identify and define landforms associated with erosional and
depositional coastlines.
   E. Describe barrier islands and their hazards as they relate to human
settlement.
   F. Explain the causes of tides.
   G. Describe the occurrences of coral reefs, salt marshes and mangrove
swamps.

XVIII.  Glacial Processes and Landforms
   A. Distinguish among the various types of glaciers.
   B. Describe the way in which glaciers form and move.
   C. Identify and describe the erosional and depositional landforms
produced by alpine and continental glaciation.
   D. Compare and contrast glacial till and glacial outwash (stratified
drift).
   E. Outline the effects of the Pleistocene glaciation to North America.
   F. Explain the mechanisms for climate fluctuation that could lead to
glaciation.
   G. Define permafrost and describe locations of permafrost today.

XIX. Ecosystem
   A. Define ecosystem.
   B. Relate the concepts of community, habitat and niche using any
organism.
   C. Explain the role of plants in photosynthesis and respiration and as
a measure of primary productivity (biomass) on the Earth.
   D. List abiotic components of the ecosystem and relate them to the
operation of the ecosystem.  
   E. Describe the roles of the autotrophs, heterotrophs and decomposers
in the food chain.
   F. Explain how diversity is related to the stability of an ecosystem.
   G. Describe the process of succession in both a terrestrial and aquatic
setting.

XX. Terrestrial Biomes
   A. Define biome.
   B. Describe the terrestrial biomes.  Relate them to climate and locate
them on a world map.

XXI. Humans and Earth
   A. Relate the human impact on the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere
and biosphere.
   B. Define the Gaia Hypothesis.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams consisting of any combination of matching,
multiple-choice, fill-in-the-blank, diagrams,
analysis of data and essays.                        500 points

Homework assignments consisting of any
combination of graphing and analysis of data,
outline of a case study, research on a physical
geography current problem and landscape analysis.    200 points

The grade for the course will be determined by the student's performance
on the exams and homework assignments.  A total of 700 points is possible
for the course.  Final grades are determined as follows:

Grading Criteria     Minimum Points

   A                   630  (90%)
   B                   560  (80%)
   C                   490  (70%)
   D                   420  (60%)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

GEOS 140H

No information found.

GEOS 141

  • Title: Physical Geography Lab*
  • Number: GEOS 141
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: GEOS 140 or the equivalent.

Description:

Students in this course will practice their knowledge of physical geography through the collection and analysis of atmospheric data and the identification and interpretation of landforms and biological patterns as depicted on topographic maps and remotely sensed imagery. 4 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use the Earth Reference Grid to describe location on the Earth and use directions and a compass to navigate from one place to another.
  2. Interpret a topographic map.
  3. Describe and use a geographic information system to analyze a landscape.
  4. Explain how the Earth-Sun relationships affect insolation on Earth.
  5. Explain the patterns of temperature on Earth.
  6. Explain the patterns of pressure on Earth.
  7. Describe how atmospheric humidity affects air mass stability with changing temperatures.
  8. Interpret weather maps.
  9. Use the water balance concept to explain water resources.
  10. Describe the global climate system.
  11. Describe the mechanisms and patterns of plate tectonics as indicated by volcanic and earthquake activity.
  12. Interpret fluvial geomorphic features and landforms on topographic maps and photos.
  13. Interpret glacial geomorphic features and landforms on topographic maps and photos.
  14. Interpret coastal geomorphic features and landforms on topographic maps and photos
  15. Interpret arid geomorphic features and landforms on topographic maps and photos.
  16. Describe a soil profile at a given location and explain how profiles change with the soil forming factors.
  17. Describe the terrestrial biomes while considering the global climate system and locate them on a map.
  18. Gather, record and analyze data following the appropriate format. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Earth Reference Grid and Compass Directions
   A. Define a great circle and a small circle.
   B. Define latitude and parallel, longitude and meridian and use them in
a sketch to demonstrate the reference grid.
   C. Use latitude and longitude to locate places on Earth’s surface.
   D. Describe the methods of indicating direction using bearings and
azimuths.
   E. Define magnetic declination and apply it to correct compass
readings.
   F. Explain the Universal Transverse Mercator grid system.

II. Interpreting Topographic Maps
   A. Define the map projection concept and identify classes of map
projections.
   B. Recognize and compare distortions of map projections.
   C. Compare methods of expressing map scale and calculate map scales.
   D. Explain the mapping system used in the United States.
   E. Construct contour lines and interpret a mapped landscape.
   F. Construct a topographic profile and calculate vertical
exaggeration.
   G. Describe and use the legend and marginal labels on a topographic
quadrangle map.

III. Using a Geographic Information System (GIS)
   A. Describe GIS concepts.
   B. Use a raster-based GIS to analyze spatial and attribute data in
order to answer a question.
   C. Prepare overlays and analyze the data in order to answer a
question.

IV. Earth-Sun Relationships
   A. Label diagrams of the Earth-Sun relationship through seasonal
changes.
   B. Identify the patterns of insolation at the top of the atmosphere at
different latitudes throughout the seasons.
   C. Determine the Sun’s declination, angle of incidence and the
intensity of the solar beam for various latitudes through the seasons.

V. Temperature Patterns
   A. Graph altitudinal temperature changes in the atmosphere.
   B. Differentiate between and convert metric and English units of
measures.
   C. Obtain temperature data.
   D. Compare and contrast temperature patterns of various locations on
Earth.
   E. Interpret and construct isotherm maps.

VI. Pressure Patterns
   A. Graph altitudinal pressure changes in the atmosphere.
   B. Explain the standard atmosphere concept and plot key elements on a
graph.
   C. Obtain pressure data.
   D. Analyze global pressure patterns.
   E. Interpret and construct isobar maps.

VII. Atmospheric Moisture
   A. Define humidity and describe several ways of measuring it.
   B. Calculate relative humidity and graph it as compared to
temperature.

VIII. Weather Map Interpretation
   A. Identify symbols used to depict weather conditions at stations on
weather maps.
   B. Construct a weather map by drawing isobars and fronts and labeling
air masses.
   C. Portray weather conditions based on interpretation of a weather map
for a given day.

IX. Water Resources
   A. Identify and define the water balance components.
   B. Compare and contrast graphs and maps of precipitation and potential
evapotranspiration.
   C. Analyze and describe groundwater processes and the landforms they
produce using topographic maps and photos.

X. Climate System
   A. Identify patterns of temperature, precipitation and other weather
elements that contribute to the climate of an area.
   B. Analyze climate data to determine the climate designation.
   C. Plot data on climographs for analysis.

XI. Plate Tectonics
   A. Describe the structure, composition and density of Earth’s
layers.
   B. Diagram the structure of the lithosphere.
   C. Explain how sea floor spreading operates.
   D. Relate plate tectonic boundaries to types of faults, folds and
volcanism.
   E. Analyze the movement of plates.
   F. Analyze and describe tectonic landforms using topographic maps and
photos.

XII. Fluvial Geomorphology
   A. Analyze and describe fluvial geomorphic processes using topographic
maps and photos.
   B. Interpret and describe fluvial processes and the landforms they
produce.
   C. Calculate stream gradient.

XIII. Glacial Geomorphology
   A. Analyze and describe glacial geomorphic processes using topographic
maps and photos.
   B. Interpret and describe glacial processes and the landforms they
produce.
   C. Use data to graph, calculate and analyze glacial mass balance.

XIV. Coastal Geomorphology
   A. Analyze and describe coastal geomorphic processes using topographic
maps and photos.
   B. Interpret and describe coastal processes and the landforms they
produce.

XV. Arid Geomorphology
   A. Analyze and describe arid geomorphic processes using topographic
maps and photos.
   B. Interpret and describe arid processes and the landforms they
produce.

XVI. Soil Geomorphology
   A. Obtain a soil core.
   B. Use the soil’s characteristics to describe the soil horizons in a
profile.
   C. Compare and contrast soil profiles.

XVII. Terrestrial Biomes
   A. Relate vertical life zones to the latitudinal distribution of
biomes.
   B. Compare climate system classifications with the pattern of biomes.
   C. Classify biomes according to their characteristics.
   D. Use a biome map and a description of biomes to analyze questions.

XVIII. Data Collection and Analysis
   A. Follow directions accurately.
   B. Work safely and effectively.
   C. Acquire data using computers and equipment.
   D. List or describe experimental assumptions made and any deviations
from the written experimental procedure.
   E. Create notebooks and laboratory reports that are clear,
understandable and accurately represent the data collected.
   F. Display data in a spreadsheet or graphically.
   G. Carry out suitable calculations with quantitative data.
   H. Use observations of data to present relevant conclusions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams consisting of any combination of matching, fill-in-the-blank,
diagrams, map and remotely sensed imagery interpretation, graphing and
analysis of physical geographic data and essays.  200 points 
    
Laboratory exercises consisting of any combination of graphing and
analysis of physical geographic data, sketching and labeling of diagrams,
using taxonomic keys to classify climates, map and remotely sensed imagery
interpretation and field trips.  150 points

The grade for the course will be determined by the student's performance
on the exams and laboratory assignments.  A total of 350 points is
possible for the course.  Final grades are determined as follows:

Grading Criteria     Minimum Points

      A                315  (90%)
      B                280  (80%)
      C                245  (70%)
      D                210  (60%)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. Some lab activities may take place outdoors, both on and off campus.  

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

GEOS 145

  • Title: World Regional Geography
  • Number: GEOS 145
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

In this introductory course, the student will first review the basic theories of the discipline of geography, the relationship of world population and resources and the factors affecting development. Next, the student will survey the major regions of the world to identify each region's distinguishing geographic characteristics, summarize its past development and explain the key issues affecting the region's future development. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the nations of the world's regions and the major physiographic features of each region.
  2. Define basic geographic terminology.
  3. Utilize maps and spatial data to interpret geographic phenomena.
  4. Recognize the discipline of geography as a methodology to describe the world, analyze interrelationships between physical and cultural phenomena and explain why resources are distributed over the Earth.
  5. Define and evaluate regions and the process of regionalization.
  6. Analyze world population, its historic growth and future projections of growth.
  7. Identify the physical and cultural components of the human environment.
  8. Explain and evaluate human-environment interaction.
  9. Contrast the characteristics of more developed and less developed nations.
  10. Analyze and evaluate the development of the various geographic regions of the world in terms of the major aspects of their physical, political, economical, historical and cultural geography.
  11. Describe and explain global interconnectedness.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Concepts and Ideas of World Regional Geography
   A. The discipline of geography
      1. Describe the evolution of geography as a formal discipline.
      2. Identify the subfields of geography.
      3. Relate geography to other disciplines.
      4. Explain the relationship between geographic factors and economic
development.
   B. Relationship between population and resources
      1. Trace the growth of the world’s population over the last 6,000
years.
      2. Describe the distribution and density of the world’s
population.
      3. Explain the differences between the Malthusian, Neo-Malthusian
and Technocratic Theories of the relationship between population growth
and resources.
      4. Define the resource concept.
      5. Differentiate between fund and flow resources.
      6. Explain how resources can be expanded and lost.
   C. Interrelationship between physical and cultural components of the
human environment
      1. List the three chief factors affecting the level of economic
development in an area.
      2. Describe the physical elements of an area: landforms, climates
and natural resources.
      3. Define culture.
      4. Identify the primary and secondary culture hearths of the world.
      5. Describe the impact of language, religion and political ideology
on culture.
      6. Describe the evolution of social and political organization.
      7. Describe the levels of economic activity.
      8. Discuss the economic organization of the society continuum from
traditional to industrialized.
      9. Describe the economic characteristics indicating a country’s
level of modernization.
     10. Explain the role of trade relationships in economic development.
   D. Economic development
      1. Describe the three criteria used to classify the level of
economic development in a country: per capita GNP, per capita consumption,
of inanimate energy and percent of the labor force in primary activities.
      2. Describe the two measures of development that consider both
economic and cultural attributes: the Human Development Index (HDI) and
the Gurder-Related Development Index (GDI).
      3. Describe the economic and cultural characteristics of “more
developed” and “less developed” regions.
      4. Discuss the conflicting theories that attempt to explain
differences in development of regions: cultural determinism, environmental
determinism, mercantilism, dependency theory, neocolonialism, circular
causation, Rostow’s Stages and the Lacostian View.
      5. Identify the more developed and less developed regions of the
world and explain their categorization.
      6. Describe recent trends in Per Capita GNP, agricultural production
and industrial productivity in more developed and less developed
countries.
II. Regional Geography of the More Developed Regions
   A. Anglo America: United States and Canada
      1. Describe the bases for development of the region.
      2. Trace the economic development of the region.
      3. Identify the fundamental social, economic and political problems
of the region.
   B. Western Europe.
      1. Identify the locational and physical bases for development of the
region.
      2. Describe the culture of the region.
      3. Trace the trends towards unity since World War II.
      4. Describe the historic changes in population, industrialization,
agriculture and urbanization.
      5. Identify the nations comprising the European Union (EU) and
summarize the key geographic characteristics of each.
      6. Infer the future problems for the European Union.
   C. Eastern Europe, Russia and the Eurasian States of the former Soviet
Union  
      1. Survey the primary political, physical, cultural and economic
characteristics of the region.
      2. Identify the natural vegetation, landforms and population
distributions of the region.
      3. Describe the economic geography of the region.
   D. Australia/New Zealand and Japan
      1. Describe the geographical bases of development in Australia/New
Zealand.
      2. Explain the rise of Japan as an economic giant.
      3. Identify the Rostow Stages in Japan’s development.
      4. Examine methods for Japan to maintain its competitiveness into
the future.
III. Regional Geography of the Less Developed Regions
   A. Monsoon Asia: East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia
      1. Describe the distinctive climate of this region, its causes and
its effects.
      2. Describe the region’s cultural geography including the major
languages and religions.
      3. Describe the impact of colonialism on the region.
      4. Review the development indicators for Monsoon Asia.
      5. Survey the cultural, political and economic development of
Monsoon Asia.
      6. Describe the population distribution of Monsoon Asia.
      7. Examine the challenges to the region’s future.
   B. Middle East and North Africa
      1. Survey the physical and cultural environments.
      2. Contrast the economics of Egypt, Algeria and Turkey with Israel,
Jordan, Lebanon and Syria.
      3. Explain the diverse impacts of petroleum exploration and
production on the Persian Gulf States.
      4. Assess the region’s future.
   C. Africa South of the Sahara
      1. Describe the physical geography of the four major subdivisions of
the region: West, Central, East and South.
      2. Survey the cultural heritage of the region including linguistic
and religious diversity.
      3. Identify the impacts of colonialism.
      4. Describe the population distribution, diversity and growth rate
in the region.
      5. Identify the future outlook for the region.
   D. Latin America: Middle America, the Caribbean and South America
      1. Explain the historical perspective for the cultural bases of the
region and how these impact economic development.
      2. Describe the current changes in the modernization of Latin
America.
      3. Identify the problems for development in Middle America and the
Caribbean. 
      4. Survey the physical geography of South America.
      5. Describe the population distribution and density of South
America.
      6. Describe the current stage of development and the potential for
the future of each country in South America.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 
  
Activities:  
  
Examinations: Students will take a minimum of four unit exams and one  
comprehensive final exam.  
  
Homework Assignments: Students will complete 13 assignments from Building  
Geographic Literacy.  
  
Summary/Response Papers: Students will complete two writing assignments  
covering all issues of current concern in a region under study.  
  
Class Participation: Students may earn five points per class through  
attendance and contribution to in-class discussions.  
  
Grading: All work is graded on a point system and computed into  
percentages.  The final grade is based on the percentage of total points  
earned from all assignments.  
  
Grades on written assignments are based on complete, correct, concrete and  
clear writing as well as incorporation of the elements and characteristics  
of the formal Summary/Response.  
  
Grading Criteria   Minimum Points Required  
  
       A                 900 ( 90%)  
       B                 800 ( 80%)  
       C                 700 ( 70%)  
       D                 600 ( 60%)  
       F                <600 (<60%)  
  
Point Summary:  
  
  Activity                 % of Total Points  
  
  Unit exams                35.0%-40.0% of grade  
  Final exam                10.0%-15.0% of grade 
 (Exams must total 50% of grade) 
  Homework                  25.0%-40.0% of grade  
  Summary/response papers   5.0%-15.0% of grade  
  Class Participation        0%-10.0 of grade  
         Total               100%  

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

GEOS 145H

No information found.

GEOS 214

  • Title: Introduction to Teaching Math and Science I*
  • Number: GEOS 214
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1.25
  • Lecture Hours: 1.25

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MATH 171 with a grade of "C" or higher OR appropriate score on the math placement test OR department approval.

Description:

This course allows math and science students to explore and develop an appreciation for teaching as a career. To support their learning, students will be introduced to the theory and practice that is necessary to design and deliver quality instruction. They will plan and implement lessons of an inquiry-based curriculum in an elementary classroom during the semester. MATH 214, ASTR 214, BIOL 214, CHEM 214, GEOS 214, PHYS 214 and PSCI 214 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Determine if teaching is a viable career path.
  2. Identify strategies for effective lesson planning and utilize these strategies to design and deliver inquiry-based lessons using the 5E Instructional Model.
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of personality and learning differences and discuss the implications for both teaching and learning.
  4. Use probing questions to elicit feedback to determine students' acquisition of knowledge.
  5. Revise lesson plans to reflect the needs of learners based on field experience gained in cooperation with a practicing classroom teacher.
  6. Research  and identify relevant state and national teaching standards.
  7. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of technology for teaching, communicating, and collaborating.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Teaching as a Career

A. Determine suitability/interest in teaching as a career through thoughtful self-reflection.

B. Explore pathways to a career in teaching.

C. Identify personal learning styles and discuss their implications for classroom interactions.

II. Strategies for Practical Lesson Design

A. Design and deliver inquiry-based hands-on lessons.

B. Write performance objectives for each lesson, including mathematics and/or science connections, and appropriate assessments for those objectives.

C. Use technology and the Internet to enhance classroom lessons, collaborate, and communicate.

III. Concepts and Components of Teaching Theory

A. Identify instructional strategies that meet the needs of diverse learners.

B. Distinguish between learner-centered and teacher-centered instructional strategies.

C. Discuss state and national science and mathematics standards and their implications for curriculum decisions.

D. Identify current issues in the theory and practice of teaching.

IV. Components of a Field Experience

A. Observe a math-science lesson taught by a cooperating teacher.

B. Interact with a population of diverse student learners in a school setting while teaching a lesson in an elementary school classroom.

C. Receive and synthesize feedback from a cooperating teacher as a peer and mentoring colleague in order to improve techniques.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

This course uses non-standard grading criteria:
90-100% = A
80-89% = B
75-79% = C
70-74% = D
0-69% = F

10-20%    Active classroom participation
20-30%    Lesson planning and associated activities
30-40%    Completion of field experience and associated activities
20-25%    Related assignments/homework

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

To successfully complete the prerequisite(s) for this course, a student must earn at least a "C" in the prerequisite course(s) or earn an appropriate score on a placement exam. If a student is found not to have successfully fulfilled the prerequisite(s) for this course, the student will be dropped from the course.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

GEOS 215

  • Title: Introduction to Teaching Math and Science II*
  • Number: GEOS 215
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1.25
  • Lecture Hours: 1.25

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ASTR 214 or BIOL 214 or CHEM 214 or GEOS 214 or MATH 214 or PHYS 214 or PSCI 214 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

Students learn about the middle school environment and work on math and science inquiry-based lesson analysis, design and assessment. Student partners will plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons in a middle school. The course emphasizes writing 5E lesson plans with a focus on the importance of using appropriate questioning and assessment strategies throughout the lesson, as well as how to analyze and modify a lesson based on personal reflections and observer feedback. By the completion of the course, students should be able to reflect on their personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science, and develop a feasible pathway to a career in teaching. MATH 215, ASTR 215, BIOL 215, CHEM 215, GEOS 215, PHYS 215 and PSCI 215 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Design inquiry-based middle school lesson plans, utilizing resources from exemplary inquiry-based science and mathematics lessons.
  2. Implement effective middle school teaching strategies based on the unique attributes of adolescents.
  3. Construct effective classroom learning activities using appropriate technology.
  4. Analyze data gained from pre- and post-assessments to evaluate student learning as a basis for revising lesson plans and teaching strategies.
  5. Employ techniques that offer educational equity among a population of diverse learners.
  6. Identify personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Practical Lesson Design

A. Design inquiry-based lessons using the 5E Instructional Model.

B. Write measurable performance objectives for each lesson.

C. Develop applicable pre- and post-assessments for the performance objectives.

D. Analyze student data acquired through pre- and post-assessments to improve future lesson planning.

E. Incorporate technology into at least one lesson in a manner that encourages enhanced student interaction and learning.

II. Teaching Theory

A. Identify instructional approaches that meet the needs of diverse middle school learners.

B. Develop questioning strategies to effectively interact with students with varying abilities and learning styles in a middle school classroom.

C. Develop achievable solutions to preserve instructional equity in the classroom environment.

III. Field Experience

A. Reflect upon observations of lessons taught by an experienced math/science teacher.

B. Teach three inquiry-based lessons to a middle school math or science class.

C. Use probing questions to elicit feedback to determine students’ acquisition of knowledge.

D. Synthesize feedback from both mentor teachers and master teachers in order to improve teaching techniques.

E. Reflect on teaching experiences in order to enhance future classroom interactions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15-25%    Active classroom participation and attendance
20-30%    Lesson planning and preparation
30-40%    Field experiences, reflections and associated activities
10-20%    Other assignments

100%        Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
75 – 79% = C
70 – 74% = D
0 – 69% = F

Caveats:

To successfully complete the prerequisite(s) for this course, a student must earn at least a “C” in the prerequisite course(s). If a student is found not to have successfully fulfilled the prerequisite(s) for this course, the student will be dropped from the course.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).