Physical Ed, Health & Rec (HPER)

Courses

HPER 100   Basketball (Beginning) (1 Hour)

Students will have an opportunity to learn fundamental basketball skills through demonstration and discussion of strategies for team play. Emphasis is on individual participation. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 101   Basketball (Intermediate)* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 100.

Students will have an opportunity to learn intermediate basketball skills through demonstration and discussion of strategies for team play. This course will advance the skills of the student who successfully completed the beginning basketball course. Emphasis is on individual participation and competition team play. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 104   Yoga (1 Hour)

This class will utilize techniques from yoga which aim to provide mind/body benefits including better posture and increased body awareness. Muscular strength and flexibility will be developed through poses and positions. This class will be geared toward all students, both beginners as well as those who have previous training. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 115   Soccer (1 Hour)

The fundamentals of soccer will be introduced as well as strategies necessary for team play. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 117   Power Volleyball (Beginning) (1 Hour)

The basic skills of volleyball taught in this class include the forearm pass, overhead set, serve, block and spike (attacking). Elementary offense and defense along with volleyball rules, scoring and officiating will be covered. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 118   Power Volleyball (Intermediate)* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 117.

Students will have the opportunity to build upon the basic fundamentals of the Power Volleyball (Beginning) class. Intermediate skills, strategies, offensive and defensive systems and rules will be covered for six-player, four-player, three-player, and two-player volleyball. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 124   Tai Chi I (1 Hour)

The class will introduce students to the practice of tai chi. Students will learn the basic structure, footwork and breathing involved in the execution of routines consisting of a variety of postures. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 130   Running Awareness and Exercise (1 Hour)

The course will introduce the student to aerobic fitness through the activity of running. The training principles for running and competitive racing will be covered, and the individual will complete a personal running and/or racing training program. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 134   Weight Training (Beginning) (1 Hour)

In this class, muscular strength and endurance will be developed through weight training activity. A workout program will be implemented for each student. The muscular system, basic terminology of weight training and weight training theory will be discussed. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 135   Weight Training (Intermediate)* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 134.

In this class, muscular strength and endurance will be developed. A self-designed and directed resistance workout program will be implemented. The proper use of a training log and personal fitness evaluation techniques will be discussed. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 137   Tennis (Beginning) (1 Hour)

Students will get individualized instruction in this course on the rules, terminology and history of tennis. The student will receive instruction on the basic strokes of tennis, as well as the strategies of singles and doubles play. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 138   Tennis (Intermediate)* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 137.

Students will review the rules, terminology and history of tennis. The student will receive instruction on the strokes of tennis, as well as the strategies of singles and doubles play in a competitive format. Emphasis will be on the mental and physical conditioning of the game. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 139   Pickleball (1 Hour)

Students will review the rules, terminology and history of pickleball. The student will receive instruction on the strokes of pickleball, as well as the strategies of singles and doubles play in a competitive format. Emphasis will be on the mental and physical conditioning of the game.

HPER 140   Modern Dance (Beginning) (1 Hour)

This course emphasizes the movement between positions rather than the picture-perfect poses of ballet and other dance styles. Moving through space off of and onto the floor, breathing and improvisational movement will be explored. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 150   Aerobics (Beginning) (1 Hour)

Motor skills, jogging and dance steps are combined in this exercise program to improve muscle tone and cardiovascular fitness. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 155   Ballet (Beginning) (1 Hour)

This progressive ballet system is designed to produce muscular strength and flexibility and a working knowledge of anatomy, plus the aesthetic satisfaction of expressing yourself through a classical art form. Offered to students of all ages and experience, both beginners as well as those who have had some training. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 158   Jazz Dance (Beginning) (1 Hour)

An introduction to the concepts and motor skills involved with jazz dance. Basic body position will be introduced as well as basic terminology, jazz history, various jazz styles and the basic techniques involved, isolations, combinations, choreography and rhythmic influences. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 165   Karate I (1 Hour)

The student will receive instruction in the basic fundamentals of karate, including stances, blocks, kicks, strikes and self-defense techniques. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 166   Karate II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 165.

The student will review the skills from the prerequisite course of Karate I. Students will demonstrate techniques that include the moving block, kicks and positions for karate. The course will also cover combination moves as well as the defensive technique. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 167   Karate III* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 166.

Students will have the opportunity to achieve higher levels of proficiency, routines, kumite (sport/free fighting) and self-defense. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 168   Karate IV* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 167; Note: Beginning Japanese is a suggested prerequisite.

Students in this course will have the opportunity to achieve the advanced level of karate in the following: taiso (exercise), kata (forms), kumite (sport/free fighting) and self-defense application. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 172   Track and Field (Beginning) (1 Hour)

This course will introduce the student to the sport of track and field. Through activity and discussion the student will improve his or her motor ability to perform track and field events. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 174   Coaching and Officiating of Track and Field (2 Hours)

Students will have the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of coaching and officiating track and field events. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be prepared for USATF Level 1 certification. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HPER 175   Fencing (1 Hour)

Beginning foil fencing will provide the student with the fundamental rules and techniques of foil fencing. The student will utilize these skills in a fencing bout. The student will also be instructed in the rules and procedures of officiating foil fencing. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 176   Self Defense I (1 Hour)

The class will present students with a variety of techniques for escaping a physical attack. Students will receive an introduction to the four ranges of self-defense: ground, grappling, striking and weapons. Students will learn the principles that apply in any self-defense situation and the basic positions and structure of each range. The class is appropriate for beginners as well as those with previous self-defense or martial arts training. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 177   Self Defense II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 176.

This class will build on techniques introduced in Self Defense I, adding new techniques, combining techniques and applying the techniques in a variety of scenarios. Emphasis remains on the principles that apply at any range as well as drills to develop proper structure and mechanics. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 185   Archery (1 Hour)

Students will receive individualized instruction in the basic skills of archery as a recreational sport lending itself as a lifetime leisure interest. Safety, fundamental care and usage of archery tackle, and beginning archery skills will be taught, along with a survey of the history of archery. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 192   Wellness for Life (1 Hour)

This course introduces students to the theory and principles upon which the concepts of lifetime fitness and wellness are based. Students will examine the relationship that exists between wellness and lifestyle behaviors. Individual self-assessments will be used to establish current health and fitness levels. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

HPER 194   Sports Conditioning (Beginning) (1 Hour)

Students will have the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of general and sports-specific conditioning. All aspects of physical and psychological development are incorporated in this class. Strength, power, speed, acceleration, muscular hypertrophy and endurance, cardiovascular endurance, motor skills and agility drills are taught and practiced. The class will include general physical preparation sport fitness, plyometrics, agility drills and sport-related specific conditioning. The students will learn about the principle of year-round conditioning, including conditioning appropriate to the off-season, preparatory period, pre-competition period and competition period. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 195   Introduction to Sports Medicine (3 Hours)

The purpose of this class is to introduce the basic concepts of sports medicine, specifically Athletic Training. It will address the fundamentals of the human musculoskeletal system, sports-related injuries, injury treatment and other sports medicine-related topics. This class is designed for beginning athletic training students and other students interested in the subject. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HPER 197   Sports Conditioning (Intermediate)* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 194.

Students will have the opportunity to build upon principles and practices of general and sports-specific conditioning learned in Beginning Sports Conditioning. All aspects of physical and psychological development are incorporated in this class. Strength, power, speed, acceleration, muscular hypertrophy and endurance, cardiovascular endurance, motor skills and agility drills are taught and practiced. The class will include general physical preparation, sport fitness and conditioning. Students will continue to learn about the principle of year-round conditioning, including conditioning appropriate to the off-season, preparatory period, pre-competition period and competition period. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 198   Athletic Training Practicum I* (1 Hour)

Corequisites: HPER 195.

At the conclusion of this practicum, the student will be able to explain and demonstrate a variety of basic principles and practices in athletic training, including the essentials of record keeping, athletic injury taping and strapping techniques, an introduction to the supervised use of and safety procedures for therapeutic modalities and therapeutic exercise equipment. Major anatomical landmarks and basic anatomy of the major joints of the human body will be identified and palpated. This practicum, intended for athletic training and other allied health students, will be hands-on and conducted under the direct supervision of a certified/licensed athletic trainer. 16 hrs. lecture, 112 hrs. practicum.

HPER 200   First Aid and CPR (2 Hours)

After completing this course, students should be able to perform the basic skills of first aid. The course will cover cause, prevention and first aid care of common emergencies. Certification may be earned in first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillators (AED). 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HPER 202   Personal Community Health (3 Hours)  

This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and understanding to make positive, healthy lifestyle choices. In addition, students will learn about issues within the community that affect their daily health, both directly and indirectly. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HPER 204   Care and Prevention of Athletic Injury (3 Hours)

Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries will focus on recognition, evaluation, treatment and recording of common athletic injuries. Human anatomy will be emphasized through the understanding of athletic movements and physical testing. Additional topics include legal and ethical practices for the athletic trainer and the psychology of today's competitive athlete. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries is the basic sports medicine class required by most exercise science and coaching degree programs. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HPER 207   Athletic Training Practicum II* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: HPER 195 and HPER 198 and BIOL 140 and BIOL 225.

Corequisites: HPER 204.

At the conclusion of this practicum, the student will be able to explain and demonstrate the basic theories supporting the uses of therapeutic modalities and therapeutic exercise, and the evaluation/assessment of injuries to athletes. The student will demonstrate a functional understanding of the major muscle groups of the human body. The student will be able to discuss and explain the duties and responsibilities of a certified athletic trainer (ATC). Direct work with specific athletic teams will facilitate the practicum. This practicum will be hands-on, and conducted under the direct supervision of a certified/licensed athletic trainer. This class is intended for athletic training and other allied health students. 16 hrs. lecture and 304 hrs. practicum.

HPER 208   Introduction to Exercise Physiology (3 Hours)

This introduction to exercise physiology will introduce the effects of exercise on the muscular system, the cardiovascular system and the metabolic system. The course will prepare the student in the design of and principles for an individual exercise program. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HPER 220   Sports Officiating (3 Hours)

The rules and practical application of officiating will be covered for the following sports: volleyball, football, basketball, baseball and softball. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HPER 224   Outdoor Recreation (3 Hours)

This course introduces the student to activities that create interaction between the individual and elements of the outdoor recreational setting. Outdoor Recreation students study the fundamental basics of governmental, private and public control of recreational lands. Outdoor recreation projects include a variety of outdoor activities, such as camping, hiking, nature observation, biking, rock climbing, canoeing, skiing, map and compass, outdoor safety, and how to dress and pack for outdoor adventures. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HPER 240   Lifetime Fitness I (1 Hour)

Lifetime Fitness introduces the student to basic fitness principles, physical activity and the relationship to a healthy lifestyle. This class is designed to provide a variety of physical activity experiences. Students will gain an understanding of the necessary skills needed to develop and implement personal lifestyle improvements related to cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body composition. Physical activity tracking will be utilized in this course.

HPER 241   Lifetime Fitness II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 240.

This course is a continuation and expansion of Lifetime Fitness I. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 242   Lifetime Fitness III* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 241.

This course is a continuation and expansion of Lifetime Fitness II. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 243   Lifetime Fitness IV* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: HPER 242.

This course is a continuation and expansion of Lifetime Fitness III. 2 hrs./wk.

HPER 245   Elementary Physical Education (3 Hours)

This course is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to teach in the area of elementary physical education and/or elementary education. This course will provide the students with knowledge and background in planning, classroom management techniques, teaching methodology, legal liability, evaluation, wellness, special students, sports, activities and games related to elementary physical education. The course will include observation and teaching. 3 hrs.lecture/wk.

HPER 255   Introduction to Physical Education (3 Hours)

This course will introduce the student to the field of physical education and sport. This course will discuss the historical, biomechanical, physiological and psychological foundations of physical education and sport. It will examine the role of physical activity as a means to help individuals acquire the skills, fitness levels and knowledge that contribute to the arena of physical development and organized competition. It will also discuss the role physical education and sports play in our society. Each individual will develop a personal philosophy for physical education and sports. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HPER 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

HPER 100

  • Title: Basketball (Beginning)
  • Number: HPER 100
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

Students will have an opportunity to learn fundamental basketball skills through demonstration and discussion of strategies for team play. Emphasis is on individual participation. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Outline the major historical events for the game of basketball.

  2. Recognize how the game of basketball is played.

  3. Demonstrate proper shooting techniques.

  4. Demonstrate and differentiate the types of passes.

  5. Demonstrate the proper ball handling fundamentals.

  6. Demonstrate offensive and defensive rebounding fundamentals.

  7. Demonstrate basic individual defensive fundamentals.

  8. Demonstrate basic individual offensive fundamentals.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of Basketball

A. Explain the major historical events of basketball.

II. How to Play the Game of Basketball

A. Outline the rules of basketball.

B. Explain proper scoring of basketball.

C. Explain fundamental dynamics of beginning, playing and ending a basketball game.

III. Shooting

A. Demonstrate proper balance of stance.

B. Demonstrate correct position of elbow.

C. Describe "eyes on the target."

D. Demonstrate proper follow-through.

E. Demonstrate right and left lay-up.

F. Demonstrate jump shot.

IV. Passing

A. Demonstrate proper grip on the ball.

B. Demonstrate proper footwork in passing.

C. Demonstrate proper technique in receiving a pass.

D. Demonstrate chest pass, bounce pass, overhead pass and baseball pass.

V. Ball Handling

A. Demonstrate controlled dribbling.

B. Demonstrate change of speed.

C. Demonstrate change of direction.

D. Demonstrate pivoting.

VI. Rebounding

A. Demonstrate inside pivot right and left.

B. Demonstrate reverse pivot right and left.

C. Demonstrate securing the rebound.

D. Demonstrate proper outlet passes.

VII. Individual Defense

A. Demonstrate proper hand and foot positions.

B. Demonstrate “ball, you, man” principles.

C. Demonstrate help and recover principles.

VIII. Individual Offense

A. Demonstrate one-on-one fundamentals.

B. Demonstrate playing without the ball.

C. Demonstrate three-on-three fundamentals.

D. Demonstrate five-on-five fundamentals.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous and/or potentially dangerous activity

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 101

  • Title: Basketball (Intermediate)*
  • Number: HPER 101
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 100.

Description:

Students will have an opportunity to learn intermediate basketball skills through demonstration and discussion of strategies for team play. This course will advance the skills of the student who successfully completed the beginning basketball course. Emphasis is on individual participation and competition team play. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Outline and explain the major historical events for the game of basketball.
  2. Discuss and demonstrate proper team play for basketball.
  3. Review and demonstrate proper shooting techniques in a game situation.
  4. Review and demonstrate the different types of passes during team play.
  5. Review and demonstrate the proper ball handling fundamentals in a game situation.
  6. Review and demonstrate offensive and defensive rebounding fundamentals in a game situation.
  7. Review and demonstrate basic individual defensive fundamentals during team play.
  8. Review and demonstrate basic individual offensive fundamentals during team play.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of Basketball

A. Explain the major historical events of basketball.

II. How to play the game of basketball.

A. Review and outline the rules of basketball.

B. Review and explain proper scoring for the game of basketball.

C. Review and explain fundamental dynamics of beginning, playing and ending a basketball game.

III. Shooting

A. Review and demonstrate proper balance of stance.

B. Review and demonstrate correct position of elbow.

C. Review and describe "eyes on the target."

D. Review and demonstrate proper follow through.

E. Review and demonstrate right and left lay-up.

F. Discuss the fundamentals and demonstrate the reverse lay-up.

G. Discuss the fundamentals and demonstrate the jump shot.

H. Discuss the fundamentals and demonstrate the bank shot.

I. Discuss the fundamentals and demonstrate three-point shot.

IV. Passing

A. Review and demonstrate proper grip on the ball.

B. Review and demonstrate proper footwork in passing.

C. Review and demonstrate proper technique in receiving a pass.

D. Review and demonstrate chest pass, bounce pass, overhead pass and baseball pass.

E. Discuss the fundamentals and demonstrate the behind the back pass.

V. Ball Handling

A. Review and demonstrate controlled dribbling.

B. Review and demonstrate change of speed.

C. Review and demonstrate change of direction.

D. Review and demonstrate pivoting.

E. Discuss the fundamentals and demonstrate crossover dribble, spin dribble, between the legs dribble and behind the back dribble.

VI. Rebounding

A. Review and demonstrate inside pivot right and left.

B. Review and demonstrate reverse pivot right and left.

C. Review and demonstrate securing the rebound.

D. Review and demonstrate proper outlet passes.

E. Discuss the fundamentals and demonstrate the difference between a rebound near the basket and away from the basket.

VII. Individual Defense

A. Review and demonstrate proper hand and foot positions.

B. Review and demonstrate “ball, you, man” principles.

C. Review and demonstrate help and recover principles.

D. Demonstrate fronting the cutters.

E. Demonstrate “guard in the hole” principles.

F. Differentiate between the “ball side” and “help side.”

VIII. Individual Offense

A. Review and demonstrate one-on-one fundamentals.

B. Review and demonstrate playing without the ball.

C. Review and demonstrate three-on-three fundamentals.

D. Review and demonstrate five-on-five fundamentals.

E. Demonstrate proper techniques of setting a screen.

F. Demonstrate setting defense up to receive a screen.

G. Demonstrate different ways to come off a screen.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous and/or potentially dangerous exercise.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 104

  • Title: Yoga
  • Number: HPER 104
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This class will utilize techniques from yoga which aim to provide mind/body benefits including better posture and increased body awareness. Muscular strength and flexibility will be developed through poses and positions. This class will be geared toward all students, both beginners as well as those who have previous training. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Identify yoga positions and terminology.
  2. Perform various breathing techniques.
  3. Demonstrate proper body alignment while performing poses and positions.
  4. Demonstrate basic core strength through poses and positions.
  5. Discriminate between the various disciplines of yoga, such as Kundalini, Ashtanga, Bikram, Hatha, Iyengar and Sivananda.
  6. Explore other techniques in the mind/body connection.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Yoga

A. Demonstrate “sit/easy” position.

B. Demonstrate "dog and cat" position.

C. Demonstrate "mountain" position.

D. Demonstrate "forward bend or extension" position.

E. Demonstrate "the triangle” position.

F. Demonstrate "warrior II" position.

G. Demonstrate "the cobra" position.

H. Demonstrate "downward facing dog” position.

I. Demonstrate "head to knee" position.

J. Demonstrate "half shoulder-stand" position.

K. Demonstrate "the bridge" position.

L. Demonstrate "the corpse" position.

II. Breathing Techniques

A. Exhibit breathing technique of “In through the nose, out through the nose.”

B. Exhibit the breathing technique of “In through the nose, out through the mouth.”

C. Exhibit the breathing technique of “diaphragm breathing.”

III. Basic Body Alignment

A. Demonstrate the proper alignment of shoulders over hips.

B. Demonstrate the proper alignment of hips over ankles.

IV. Core Strength

A. Demonstrate the proper positioning of the core.

B. Demonstrate the proper positioning of the ribcage compressed.

C. Demonstrate the proper positioning of the belly button toward spine.

D. Demonstrate the proper positioning of the shoulders relaxed.

V. Disciplines of Yoga

A. Define the principles/techniques of Yama.

B. Define the principles/techniques of Niyama.

C. Define the principles/techniques of Asana.

D. Define the principles/techniques of Pranayama.

E. Define the principles/techniques of Pratyahara.

F. Define the principles/techniques of Dharana.

G. Define the principles/techniques of Dhyana.

H. Define the principles/techniques of Samadhi.

VI. Mind/Body Connection Techniques

A. Perform various body awareness techniques.

B. Perform various posture techniques.

C. Perform various relaxation techniques.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 115

  • Title: Soccer
  • Number: HPER 115
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

The fundamentals of soccer will be introduced as well as strategies necessary for team play. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the fundamental skills of soccer including ball control, passing, juggling and dribbling.
  2. Review and demonstrate various team and individual player positions.
  3. Explain and correctly apply the rules to game situations.
  4. Demonstrate a level of confidence in play to contribute to a team during a game.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fundamental Skills of Soccer

A. Explain and demonstrate ball control.

B. Explain and demonstrate passing.

C. Explain and demonstrate juggling and dribbling.

II. Team and Individual Positions

A. Describe and demonstrate patterns of play by individual position.

B. Describe and demonstrate patterns of team play.

C. Discuss team strategies.

III. Rules of Soccer

A. Review and discuss the rules of soccer.

B. Apply the rules of soccer to game situations.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous and/or potentially dangerous exercise.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 117

  • Title: Power Volleyball (Beginning)
  • Number: HPER 117
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

The basic skills of volleyball taught in this class include the forearm pass, overhead set, serve, block and spike (attacking). Elementary offense and defense along with volleyball rules, scoring and officiating will be covered. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Trace the history of volleyball.
  2. Properly execute the fundamental skills of volleyball
  3. Apply the rules during performance of volleyball.
  4. Apply correct scoring during performance of volleyball.
  5. Differentiate terminology and various officiating hand signals of volleyball.
  6. Explain and demonstrate the basic offensive and defensive systems used in class.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Identify the historical development of volleyball including: the inventor of the game, date invented and significant milestones.

II. Demonstrate the forearm pass.

III. Demonstrate the overhead pass.

IV. Demonstrate the spike.

V. Demonstrate the block.

VI. Demonstrate the serve.

VII. Identify and demonstrate at least one offensive system during performance.

VIII. Identify and demonstrate at least one defensive system during performance.

IX. Apply the rules of volleyball during performance.

X. Apply correct scoring during performance of volleyball.

XI. Differentiate volleyball officiating hand signals during volleyball performance.

XII. Identify common volleyball terminology.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 118

  • Title: Power Volleyball (Intermediate)*
  • Number: HPER 118
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 117.

Description:

Students will have the opportunity to build upon the basic fundamentals of the Power Volleyball (Beginning) class. Intermediate skills, strategies, offensive and defensive systems and rules will be covered for six-player, four-player, three-player, and two-player volleyball. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate intermediate volleyball skills.
  2. Apply specific strategies for volleyball.
  3. Demonstrate intermediate offensive and defensive systems of volleyball.
  4. Apply rules and scoring during performance of volleyball.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Intermediate volleyball skills

A. Demonstrate intermediate volleyball skills of passing, setting, serving, spiking and blocking.

II. 6-Player Volleyball

A. Demonstrate the fundamentals of a 6-2 and a 5-1 offensive system.

B. Differentiate the various sets and combination spiking.

C. Demonstrate the middle back defensive system.

D. Demonstrate spiker coverage.

E. Apply strategy when playing 6-player volleyball.

F. Apply rules and scoring during performance of 6-player volleyball.

III. 4-Player Volleyball

A. Apply strategy when playing 4-player volleyball.

B. Apply rules and scoring during performance of 4-player volleyball.

IV. 3-Player Volleyball

A. Apply strategy when playing 3-player volleyball.

B. Apply rules and scoring during performance of 3-player volleyball.

V. 2-Player Volleyball

A. Apply strategy when playing 2-player volleyball.

B. Apply rules and scoring during performance of 2-player volleyball.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 124

  • Title: Tai Chi I
  • Number: HPER 124
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

The class will introduce students to the practice of tai chi. Students will learn the basic structure, footwork and breathing involved in the execution of routines consisting of a variety of postures. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic structure, footwork and breathing necessary to perform tai chi.
  2. Identify some of the health benefits associated with the practice of tai chi.
  3. Define the concept of chi and its role in Eastern philosophy.
  4. Perform a short routine of tai chi postures.
  5. Describe the relationship between tai chi, chi kung and Chinese medicine.
  6. Apply at least one posture in a self-defense situation.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Health

A. Define the concept of chi and its flow throughout the body.

B. Describe how the practice of tai chi leads to the generation of chi.

C. Identify some of the health benefits associated with the practice of tai chi.

II. Philosophy

A. Compare internal and external styles of martial arts.

B. Identify the role of chi in Eastern philosophy.

C. Describe the relationship between tai chi, chi kung and Chinese medicine.

III. Footwork

A. Step before shifting weight, rather than while shifting weight.

B. Bend light leg before driving with heavy leg.

C. Shift weight by driving through soles of feet.

IV. Structure

A. Turn waist and shoulders as one unit.

B. Position head above one leg or other to maintain balance.

C. Move same side hip and elbow together.

V. Breathing

A. Breath from the dan tian.

B. Inhale with contraction, exhale with expansion.

C. Practice chi kung to integrate meditation with movement.

VI. Drills

A. Practice silk reeling to combine weight shift, structure and breathing.

B. Perform push hands with a partner, moving with partner's energy rather than against it.

VII. Postures

A. Move between postures to combine footwork, weight shift, structure, and breathing.

B. Identify postures associated with a particular style.

C. Apply posture in self-defense situation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

60-70%    Attendance and Active Participation
20-30%    5-10 In-Class Demonstrations
5-10%      1-2 Written Examinations

Total    100 %

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous activity

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 130

  • Title: Running Awareness and Exercise
  • Number: HPER 130
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

The course will introduce the student to aerobic fitness through the activity of running. The training principles for running and competitive racing will be covered, and the individual will complete a personal running and/or racing training program. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explain and differentiate the biomechanics of running and racing.
  2. Outline the physiology of running and racing.
  3. Identify the principles of training.
  4. Identify the principles of running fitness.
  5. Chart the periodization of training for competitive racing.
  6. Research the methods of training for the runner.
  7. Assess heart rate monitoring in developing a running program.
  8. Generate a flexibility program for the runner.
  9. Differentiate between aerobic weight training and strength weight training for runners.
  10. Outline the benefits of plyometric training.
  11. Research and discuss the benefits of cross-training workouts.
  12. Discuss racing strategies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Biomechanics of Running and Rracing

A. Discuss and explain the importance of proper biomechanics of running.

B. Discuss and explain the importance of proper biomechanics of racing.

II. Physiology of Running and Racing

A. Explain energy production for running and racing.

B. Discuss VO2 Max

C. Appraise an individual's lactate threshold

III. Principles of Training

A. Discuss the theory of overload training.

B. Discuss the theory of progression training.

C. Discuss the theory of specificity training.

D. Assess and discuss recovery from exercise.

IV. Principles of Running Fitness

A. Interpret the theory of lactate threshold training.

B. Outline the principles of speed development.

C. Demonstrate proper running mechanics.

V. “Periodization” of Training for Competitive Racing

A. Explore the factors in the successful periodization of competitive running.

B. Program a “periodization” training plan.

VI. Methods of Training for the Runner

A. Discuss the following theories of training: steady-state, tempo, repetition, race-pace intervals, training rest intervals, surge running, speed training and hill training.

VII. Heart Rate Monitoring

A. Discuss heart rate measures for training.

B. Associate heart rate training with lactate threshold measurements.

C. Calculate lactate threshold HR with the estimated VO2 maximum.

D. Discuss Threshold HR, VO2 Max and their implications in training.

VIII. Flexibility for the Runner

A. Research sample flexibility programs.

B. Correlate warm-up and warm-down with proper flexibility programs.

C. Demonstrate proper flexibility exercises.

IX. Strength and Endurance Weight Training for Running Fitness

A. Explain weight training for aerobic endurance.

B. Explain weight training for muscle strength.

X. Plyometric Training

A. Outline the methods for plyometric training for runners.

B. Differentiate between types of plyometric training.

XI. Cross-Training Workouts

A. Research alternate cross-training methods for a running program.

XII. Racing Strategies

A. Develop race strategies for the following race distances: 1500m, 5k, 8k, 10k and marathon.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 134

  • Title: Weight Training (Beginning)
  • Number: HPER 134
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

In this class, muscular strength and endurance will be developed through weight training activity. A workout program will be implemented for each student. The muscular system, basic terminology of weight training and weight training theory will be discussed. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Plan and demonstrate an individual program of resistance training and physical conditioning.
  2. Put into practice a thorough working knowledge of terminology of resistance training.
  3. Demonstrate increases in physical and muscular flexibility.
  4. Discriminate between the various disciplines of weight training, such as Olympic weight lifting, power lifting, fitness weight training, weight training for improving athletic performance, and so forth.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Resistance Training Review

A. Review the course outline and methods of instruction.

B. Define the term “weight training.”

C. Define the term “weight lifting.”

D. Distinguish between Olympic weight lifting, power lifting, fitness weight training, weight training for improving athletic performance.

E. Identify and implement resistance training safety rules.

F. Identify and define specific terminology associated with the practice of resistance training.

G. Identify and define the basic physiology concepts of resistance training.

II. Introduction to Basic Resistance Training Exercises

A. Explain and demonstrate the proper biomechanical principles and body postures necessary to properly and safely perform sports conditioning exercises.

B. Implement and demonstrate foundational lifts.

III. Introduction to a Variety of Resistance Training Exercise

A. Identify and demonstrate lower body resistance exercises

B. Identify and demonstrate upper body resistance exercises

C. Identify and demonstrate abdominal/midsection/ “core” resistance exercises.

D. Identify and demonstrate muscle flexibility exercises.

IV. Introduction to Resistance Training Program Design.

A. Identify and explain personal physiological factors

B. Identify personal goals for a resistance training program

C. Identify, choose and utilize exercise commensurate with identified personal fitness goals.

D. Devise, organize and utilize a daily training log

E. Analyze the contents of the training log.

F. Identify aspects of training routine which should be adjusted according to personal fitness goals.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous and/or potentially dangerous exercise.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 135

  • Title: Weight Training (Intermediate)*
  • Number: HPER 135
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 134.

Description:

In this class, muscular strength and endurance will be developed. A self-designed and directed resistance workout program will be implemented. The proper use of a training log and personal fitness evaluation techniques will be discussed. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Plan and demonstrate an individual program of resistance training and physical conditioning.
  2. Put into practice a thorough working knowledge of terminology of resistance training.
  3. Demonstrate increases in physical and muscular flexibility.
  4. Accurately assess personal muscular fitness goals.
  5. Record daily workouts according to a personally designed resistance workout plan based upon personal fitness goals.
  6. Analyze and adjust components of a personally designed resistance workout plan.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Resistance Training Review

A. Review the course outline and methods of instruction.

B. Review and implement resistance training safety rules.

C. Review specific terminology associated with the practice of resistance training.

II. The Design and Implementation of a Personal Resistance Training Plan

A. Review and implement the use of a training log.

B. Discuss and implement systematic tracking techniques for use with personal training log.

C. Identify and analyze personal physiological factors as applied to a personally designed resistance training plan.

D. Identify and implement personal goals for a personal resistance training program.

E. Identify aspects of a resistance training routine which should be adjusted according to personal fitness goals.

III. Application of Resistance Training Exercises

A. Explain and demonstrate the proper biomechanical principles and body postures necessary to properly and safely perform sports conditioning exercises.

B. Review and implement lower body resistance exercises within the context of a personally designed workout plan.

C. Review and implement upper body resistance exercises within the context of a personally designed workout plan.

D. Review and implement abdominal/midsection/”core” resistance exercises within the context of a personally designed workout plan.

E. Review and implement muscle flexibility exercises within the context of a personally designed workout plan.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 137

  • Title: Tennis (Beginning)
  • Number: HPER 137
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

Students will get individualized instruction in this course on the rules, terminology and history of tennis. The student will receive instruction on the basic strokes of tennis, as well as the strategies of singles and doubles play. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the differences in tennis facilities and tennis equipment.
  2. Describe and explain the rules and terminology of tennis.
  3. Describe and demonstrate the proper racquet grip and preparation in hitting the ball.
  4. Demonstrate proper ground strokes, volley technique, serving, return of serve and hitting the lob.
  5. Demonstrate the approach and drop shots.
  6. Explain the strategies for playing singles.
  7. Explain the strategies for playing doubles.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Facilities and Equipment

A. Explain what to look for when choosing a tennis court

B. Compare the effect of the court surfaces to tennis play.

C. Describe the basic equipment you will need to play tennis.

II. Rules and Terminology

A. Explain how the lines on a tennis court are used in defining the game.

B. State the basic rules of tennis.

C. Explain how the score is kept in conventional scoring, no-ad scoring and tiebreakers.

III. Racquet Grip and Preparation

A. Demonstrate the proper grip for each stroke.

B. Demonstrate the ready position

IV. Ground Strokes, Volleys, Serving, Hitting the Lob

A. Demonstrate the proper swing path for ground strokes

B. Explain the effects of spin on the ball.

C. Demonstrate proper footwork for the forehand and backhand strokes.

D. Demonstrate proper footwork for the forehand and backhand volleys.

E. Demonstrate the proper motion for hitting volleys.

F. Explain the rules governing the serve.

G. Demonstrate the server’s grip, ball toss and full serve.

H. Demonstrate the proper footwork for returning the serve.

I. Demonstrate the proper ground strokes while returning the serve.

J. Demonstrate the proper racquet position and swing path for a lob.

K. Demonstrate the proper motion for hitting the overhead.

V. Drop Shots and Approach Shots

A. Explain the proper timing in the decision to come to the net behind the approach shot.

B. Identify where to hit the approach shot for best results.

C. Demonstrate the appropriate footwork and swings for forehand and backhand approach shots.

D. Demonstrate the forehand and backhand drop shot.

VI. Strategies for Playing Singles

A. Explain why hitting ground strokes crosscourt is a high-percentage strategy.

B. Explain and differentiate between the “serve and volley” and the “baseline” game.

VII. Strategies for Playing Doubles

A. Describe the proper court positions for the serving and receiving teams while receiving serve.

B. Explain and differentiate between a team at the net versus at the baseline.

C. Explain the role of the server, the server’s partner, the receiver and the receiver’s partner in doubles play.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%   Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 138

  • Title: Tennis (Intermediate)*
  • Number: HPER 138
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 137.

Description:

Students will review the rules, terminology and history of tennis. The student will receive instruction on the strokes of tennis, as well as the strategies of singles and doubles play in a competitive format. Emphasis will be on the mental and physical conditioning of the game. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the differences in tennis facilities and tennis equipment.
  2. Describe and explain the rules and terminology of tennis.
  3. Describe and demonstrate the proper racquet grip and preparation in hitting the ball.
  4. Demonstrate proper ground strokes, volley technique, serving, return of serve and hitting the lob.
  5. Demonstrate the approach and drop shots.
  6. Explain the strategies for playing singles in a competitive format.
  7. Explain the strategies for playing doubles in a competitive format.
  8. Describe the proper conditioning for tennis.
  9. Discuss and explore the mental preparation for tennis.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Facilities and Equipment

A. Explain what to look for when choosing a tennis court

B. Compare the effect of the court surfaces to tennis play.

C. Describe the basic equipment you will need to play tennis.

II. Rules and Terminology

A. Explain how the lines on a tennis court are used in defining the game.

B. State the rules of tennis.

C. Explain how the score is kept in conventional scoring, no-ad scoring and tiebreakers.

III. Racquet Grip and Preparation

A. Demonstrate the proper grip for each stroke.

B. Demonstrate the ready position.

IV. Ground Strokes, Volleys, Serving, Hitting the Lob.

A. Demonstrate the proper swing path for ground strokes.

B. Explain the effects of spin on the ball.

C. Demonstrate proper footwork for the forehand and backhand strokes.

D. Demonstrate proper footwork for the forehand and backhand volleys.

E. Demonstrate the proper motion for hitting volleys

F. Explain the rules governing the serve.

G. Demonstrate the server’s grip, ball toss and full serve.

H. Demonstrate the proper footwork for returning the serve.

I. Demonstrate the proper ground strokes while returning the serve.

J. Demonstrate the proper racquet position and swing path for a lob.

K. Demonstrate the proper motion for hitting the overhead.

V. Drop Shots and Approach Shots

A. Explain the proper timing in the decision to come to the net behind the approach shot.

B. Identify where to hit the approach shot for best results.

C. Demonstrate the appropriate footwork and swings for forehand and backhand approach shots.

D. Demonstrate the forehand and backhand drop shot.

VI. Strategies for Playing Singles

A. Explain why hitting ground strokes crosscourt is a high-percentage strategy.

B. Explain and differentiate between the “serve and volley” and the “baseline” game.

C. Recognize the importance and footwork and speed in singles play.

D. Explain how to develop an all-around game.

E. Identify the most favorable court position on the baseline and at the net.

F. Describe your opponent's strengths and weaknesses

G. Apply these strategies to on-court play.

VII. Strategies for Playing Doubles

A. Describe the proper court positions for the serving and receiving teams while receiving serve.

B. Explain and differentiate between a team at the net versus at the baseline.

C. Explain the role of the server, the server’s partner, the receiver and the receiver’s partner in doubles play.

D. Identify the key terms associated with doubles play.

E. Identify the key responsibilities of all doubles players.

F. Apply the tennis strategies to on-court play.

VIII. Get in Shape to play Competitive Tennis

A. Explain the guidelines for tennis fitness.

B. Describe activities that can contribute to improved agility, balance and coordination.

IX. The “Mental Game”

A. Describe how relaxation and arousal can affect tennis play.

B. Explain how you can use mental rehearsal to improve your tennis skills.

C. Develop a routine that improves your tennis performance.

D. Describe how you can avoid getting “psyched-out” by an opponent.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 139

  • Title: Pickleball
  • Number: HPER 139
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

Students will review the rules, terminology and history of pickleball. The student will receive instruction on the strokes of pickleball, as well as the strategies of singles and doubles play in a competitive format. Emphasis will be on the mental and physical conditioning of the game.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the differences in pickleball facilities and pickleball equipment.
  2. Describe and explain the rules and terminology of pickleball.
  3. Describe and demonstrate the proper racquet grip and preparation in hitting the ball.
  4. Demonstrate proper ground strokes, volley technique, serving, return of serve and hitting the lob.
  5. Demonstrate the approach and drop shots.
  6. Explain the strategies for playing singles in a competitive format.
  7. Explain the strategies for playing doubles in a competitive format.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Facilities and Equipment

A. Explain what to look for when choosing a pickleball court.

B. Compare the effect of the court surfaces to pickleball play.

C. Describe the basic equipment you will need to play pickleball.

II. Rules and Terminology

A. Explain how the lines on a pickleball court are used in defining the game.

B. State the rules of pickleball.

C. Explain how the score is kept in conventional scoring.

III. Racquet Grip and Preparation

A. Demonstrate the proper grip for each stroke.

B. Demonstrate the ready position.

IV. Ground Strokes, Volleys, Serving

A. Demonstrate the proper swing path for ground strokes.

B. Demonstrate proper footwork for the forehand and backhand strokes.

C. Demonstrate proper footwork for the forehand and backhand volleys.

D. Demonstrate the proper motion for hitting volleys.

E. Explain the rules governing the serve.

F. Demonstrate the proper footwork for returning the serve.

G. Demonstrate the proper ground strokes while returning the serve.

V. Approach Shots

A. Explain the proper timing in the decision to come to the net behind the approach shot.

B. Identify where to hit the approach shot for best results.

C. Demonstrate the appropriate footwork and swings for forehand and backhand approach shots.

VI. Strategies for Playing Singles

A. Explain why hitting ground strokes crosscourt is a high-percentage strategy.

B. Explain and differentiate between the serve and volley and the baseline game.

C. Recognize the importance of footwork and speed in singles play.

D. Explain how to develop an all-around game.

E. Identify the most favorable court position on the baseline and at the net.

F. Describe your opponent's strengths and weaknesses.

G. Apply these strategies to on-court play.

VII. Strategies for Playing Doubles

A. Describe the proper court positions for the serving and receiving teams while receiving serve.

B. Explain and differentiate between a team at the net versus at the baseline.

C. Identify the key terms associated with doubles play.

D. Identify the key responsibilities of all doubles players.

E. Apply the pickleball strategies to on-court play.

VIII. Improve Physical Conditioning to Play Competitive Pickleball

A. Explain the guidelines for stretching for pickleball.

B. Describe activities that can contribute to improved agility, balance and coordination.

IX. The Mental Game

A. Describe how relaxation and arousal can affect pickleball play.

B. Explain how you can use mental rehearsal to improve your pickleball skills.

C. Develop a routine that improves your pickleball performance.

D. Describe how you can avoid getting psyched-out by an opponent.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies

10-30%    Written Examination

10-30%    Skills Development Examinations

10-20%    Written Paper

100%       Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

  1. This course involves strenuous exercise.
  2. Students are expected to provide their own paddle and dress appropriately. JCCC will provide nets and pickleballs.

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 140

  • Title: Modern Dance (Beginning)
  • Number: HPER 140
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This course emphasizes the movement between positions rather than the picture-perfect poses of ballet and other dance styles. Moving through space off of and onto the floor, breathing and improvisational movement will be explored. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the use of belly breathing while: a) horizontal, b) vertical, c) motionless, d) moving slowly and e) moving quickly.
  2. Identify her/his leading center as well as that of others.
  3. Demonstrate proper body alignment while lying, sitting, standing and moving.
  4. Demonstrate the movement concepts of modern dance.
  5. List and describe the key terminology for modern dance.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Breathing methods

A. Locate the individual's belly.

B. Demonstrate vertical breathing.

C. Demonstrate the slowing of breathing and increasing lung capacity technique.

D. Demonstrate breathing while motionless.

E. Demonstrate breathing while in the horizontal position.

F. Demonstrate breathing while moving slowly.

G. Demonstrate breathing while moving quickly.

H. Demonstrate breathing as the individual initiates movement.

I. Demonstrate breathing during difficult movements.

J. Describe the breathing technique for “When in Doubt.”

II. The body’s leading center

A. Discuss and explain the individual's “leading center” and the relationship with the head.

B. Discuss and explain the individual's “leading center” and the relationship with the heart.

C. Discuss and explain the individual's “leading center” and the relationship with the belly.

III. Basic body alignment

A. Realign the head over heart.

B. Realign the heart over the belly.

C. Demonstrate the basic fundamentals of the “turnout.”

IV. Movement concepts

A. Differentiate and describe the opposition of the following: leg/hip, arm/shoulder, down/up.

B. Describe “resistance” in relationship to movement concepts.

C. Describe “internal/external” movement in relationship to movement concepts.

D. Describe the “standing leg/working leg” movement technique.

E. Describe the “standing side/working leg” movement.

V. Basic vocabulary

A. List and explain the terminology for the activity of modern dance.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 150

  • Title: Aerobics (Beginning)
  • Number: HPER 150
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

Motor skills, jogging and dance steps are combined in this exercise program to improve muscle tone and cardiovascular fitness. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explain the theory of aerobic fitness.
  2. Explain the theory of anaerobic fitness.
  3. Define the concepts of muscular fitness.
  4. Monitor and document cardiovascular training.
  5. Document improvement in cardiovascular fitness.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Explain the Theory of Aerobic Fitness

A. Define the concept of progression in relationship to cardiovascular fitness.

B. Explain the intensity, frequency and duration of cardiovascular fitness.

C. Show and compute the “Karvonen” target heart rate.

II. Explain the Theory of Anaerobic Fitness

A. Explain intensity, frequency, duration and their effect on anaerobic exercise.

III. Define the Concepts of Muscular Fitness

A. Define muscular strength, endurance and flexibility

B. Define the concepts of overload training.

C. Differentiate between “overweight” and “overfat.”

IV. Monitor and Document Cardiovascular Training

A. Record the frequency, duration and intensity of each cardiovascular workout.

B. Compute and record the recovery rate of each cardiovascular workout.

V. Document Improvement in Cardiovascular Fitness

A. Review and summarize the “12 minute run,” 1.5 mile run and step test in relationship to your fitness level.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%       Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous and/or potentially dangerous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 155

  • Title: Ballet (Beginning)
  • Number: HPER 155
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This progressive ballet system is designed to produce muscular strength and flexibility and a working knowledge of anatomy, plus the aesthetic satisfaction of expressing yourself through a classical art form. Offered to students of all ages and experience, both beginners as well as those who have had some training. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proper body alignment while standing and moving.
  2. Demonstrate the proper alignment for the ballet movements.
  3. Demonstrate and maintain turn out while moving (in plie, releve, straight-legged).
  4. Demonstrate, explain and discuss basic ballet terminology.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Body Alignment

A. Demonstrate the proper alignment of shoulders over the hips.

B. Demonstrate the proper alignment of hips over the toes.

C. Demonstrate the proper positioning of the “ribs together and down” technique.

D. Demonstrate the proper positioning of the “stomach back and the buttocks forward” technique.

E. Demonstrate the “turnout” manuever.

II. Basic Ballet Positions

A. Demonstrate the parallel leg position.

B. Demonstrate the first, second and third leg positions.

C. Demonstrate the rest arm postion.

D. Demonstrate the preparatory arm position.

E. Demonstrate the first, second arm position.

F. Demonstrate the corresponding allonge positions.

G. Demonstrate the proper position of the head in relationship to the arm and leg positions.

H. Demonstrate the “Port de Bras” positions.

I. Discuss and demonstrate the elements of spatial awareness.

III. Basic Ballet Movements

A. Demonstrate the “Barrework” movements of ballet.

B. Demonstrate the “Center Work” movements, exercises and jumps of ballet.

C. Demonstrate the “Diagonal Work” of centers, alignments and positions of ballet.

D. Demonstrate the proper floorwork to maintain and increase flexibility for ballet.

IV. Basic Ballet terminology.

A. Discuss and explain the basic terminology for ballet.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 158

  • Title: Jazz Dance (Beginning)
  • Number: HPER 158
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

An introduction to the concepts and motor skills involved with jazz dance. Basic body position will be introduced as well as basic terminology, jazz history, various jazz styles and the basic techniques involved, isolations, combinations, choreography and rhythmic influences. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate correct execution of basic jazz dance elements and techniques.
  2. Acquire a vocabulary of jazz movement and demonstrate knowledge of the factors which influence that movement.
  3. Discuss history of jazz dance.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of music as they relate to jazz dance.
  5. Demonstrate improvement of kinesthetic sense and esthetic values such as grace and poise.
  6. Demonstrate a perception of rhythm.
  7. Perform movements skillfully and effectively through dance.
  8. Demonstrate improved motor skills in the areas of agility, balance, explosive power, flexibility, coordination, muscular endurance and strength.
  9. Perform movements needed for jazz dance isolating specific anatomical movements.
  10. Improve mental health by learning to relax and by building a better self-image.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction

A. Define goals of course.

B. Examine individual dance backgrounds and goals.

II. History

A. Trace the history of jazz dance.

III. Jazz Terminology

A. Differentiate terms relative to jazz dance.

B. Select the proper term when describing jazz movements.

IV. Basic Jazz Techniques

A. Perform a proper warmup.

1. Perform barre and center floor movements

2. Perform stretching, conditioning, toning, flexibility and injury-prevention movements

3. Perform isolations of specific anatomical movements needed for jazz technique including: head, neck, shoulder, arms, rib cage, pelvis, hips, legs

B. Demonstrate tension release through relaxation, contraction, release, extension, flexion.

C. Execute Jazz movements and elements including: foot position, foot movements, arm patterns, hand patterns, jazz walks, jazz runs, jazz hops, jazz jumps, jazz turns, leg swings, jazz passe’, heel press, attitudes-f-b-s, jazz square, jazz leaps, opposition, swinging, floor movements, lunge, plie’, pique, arabesque, penche’, sous-sus, forward tendu, folded stretch positions, flat or table back.

D. Perform special movements including: counter movements and twisting, jazz falls, traveling progression, traveling combinations, cohesive flowing dance combinations.

E. Differentiate between the following styles of jazz dance: West Coast, East Coast, Broadway, stage productions and funk.

V. Choreography

A. Identify the structure of a composition.

B. Develop movements in jazz compositions.

C. Explore rhythmic differentiation.

D. Recognize composition and space

E. Explore dance energy, emotion and dynamics

VI. Music Awareness

A. Explore beat and rhythm awareness

B. Differentiate changes in tempos, accents, rhythms and timing

C. Explore interpretation

D. Explore syncopation

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 165

  • Title: Karate I
  • Number: HPER 165
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

The student will receive instruction in the basic fundamentals of karate, including stances, blocks, kicks, strikes and self-defense techniques. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss the art of Karate.
  2. Discuss the basic movements for self defense.
  3. Demonstrate the “Dachi” (stances).
  4. Demonstrate the “Uke” (blocks).
  5. Demonstrate the “Uchi” (strikes).
  6. Demonstrate the “Geri” (kicks).

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Karate as Art

A. Discuss and explore the art of karate

II. Self-defense

A. Discuss the nature and proper use of self-defense

III. Dachi

A. Demonstrate “musubi” (closed stance).

B. Demonstrate “fudo” (open stance).

C. Demonstrate “nami” (normal stance).

D. Demonstrate “zen kutsu” (forward power stance).

E. Demonstrate “shiko” (straddle leg stance).

F. Demonstrate “kiba” (arched stance).

G. Demonstrate “neko” (cat stance).

IV. Uke

A. Demonstrate “jodan Jude,” high forearm block.

B. Demonstrate “chudan Jude,” middle forearm block.

C. Demonstrate “gedan Jude,” low forearm block.

D. Demonstrate “jodan shuto,” high knife hand block.

E. Demonstrate “chudan shuto,” middle knife hand block.

F. Demonstrate “tomoe shuto,” circle knife hand block.

G. Demonstrate “gedan hiza,” low knee block.

V. Uchi

A. Demonstrate “seiken,” two knuckle strike.

B. Demonstrate “tetui,” hammer fist strike.

C. Demonstrate “uraken,” back knuckle strike.

D. Demonstrate “hiji,” elbow strike.

E. Demonstrate “shotai,” heel of palm strike.

F. Demonstrate “shuto,” knife hand strike.

G. Demonstrate “haito,” ridge of wrist strike.

VI. Geri

A. Demonstrate “mae,” front kick.

B. Demonstrate “hiza,” knee kick.

C. Demonstrate “mawashi,” roundhouse kick.

D. Demonstrate “Yoko,” side kick.

E. Demonstrate “Ura,” back kick.

F. Demonstrate “Ushiro Ura,” reverse back kick.

G. Demonstrate “Ura Gurma,” back wheel kick.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 166

  • Title: Karate II*
  • Number: HPER 166
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 165.

Description:

The student will review the skills from the prerequisite course of Karate I. Students will demonstrate techniques that include the moving block, kicks and positions for karate. The course will also cover combination moves as well as the defensive technique. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Review and demonstrate the skills from the Karate I course.
  2. Demonstrate the standing “dachi” routines.
  3. Demonstrate the moving “dachi” routines..
  4. Demonstrate the standing “uke” routines.
  5. Demonstrate the moving “uke” routines.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Review of Karate I Course

A. Review and demonstrate the skills completed in the Karate I course.

II. Standing Dachi Routines

A. Demonstrate “musubi dachi.”

B. Demonstrate “fudo dachi.”

III. Moving Dachi Routines

A. Demonstrate the moving “nami dachi.”

B. Demonstrate the moving “zen kutsu dachi.”

C. Demonstrate the moving “shiko dachi.”

D. Demonstrate the moving “neko dachi.”

E. Demonstrate the moving “mae juji dachi.”

F. Demonstrate the moving “ura juji dachi.”

G. Demonstrate the moving “mae ura juji dachi.”

IV. Standing Uke Routines

A. Demonstrate the standing “jodan ude uke” from left “nami dachi.”

B. Demonstrate the standing “chudan ude uke” from left “zen kutsu dachi.”

C. Demonstrate the standing “gedan ude uke” from left “neko dachi.”

D. Demonstrate the standing “jodan shuto uke” from right “neko dachi.”

E. Demonstrate the standing “chudan shuto Uke” from right “neko dachi.”

F. Demonstrate the standing “gedan hiza uke” from “kiba dachi.”

G. Demonstrate the standing “shiko-complete standing dachi.”

H. Demonstrate the standing right “zen kutsu dachi.”

I. Demonstrate the standing left “nami dachi.”

J. Demonstrate the standing “fudo dachi.”

K. Demonstrate the standing “Musubi.”

V. Moving Uke Routines

A. Demonstrate the moving “jodan ude uke” with the front arm.

B. Demonstrate the moving “chudan ude uke” with the front arm.

C. Demonstrate the moving “gedam ude uke” with the front arm.

D. Demonstrate the moving “jodan shuto uke” with the front arm.

E. Demonstrate the moving “chudan shuto uke” with the front arm.

F. Demonstrate the moving “tomoe shuto uke” with the front arm.

G. Demonstrate the moving “gedan hiza uke.”

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 167

  • Title: Karate III*
  • Number: HPER 167
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 166.

Description:

Students will have the opportunity to achieve higher levels of proficiency, routines, kumite (sport/free fighting) and self-defense. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Review and demonstrate the intermediate techniques for the following routines: stances, blocks, strikes and kicks.
  2. Review and demonstrate the “Dachi,” “Uke,” “Uchi” and “Geri” routines.
  3. Demonstrate tournament competition techniques with Kata (form) and Kumite (free fighting).
  4. Demonstrate the basic self-defense maneuvers.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Review of Basic Skills

A. Demonstrate all stances.

B. Demonstrate all blocks.

C. Demonstrate all strikes.

D. Demonstrate all kicks.

E. Review the Japanese terminology and translations for all techniques.

II. Demonstrate Routines

A. Demonstrate the standing and moving forms of “Dachi.”

B. Demonstrate the standing and moving forms of “Uke.”

C. Demonstrate the standing and moving forms of “Uchi.”

D. Demonstrate the standing and moving forms of “Geri.”

III. Preparing for Competition

A. Discuss and demonstrate the forms of “Kata.”

B. Discuss and demonstrate the forms of “Kumite.”

C. Demonstrate and participate in endurance sparring.

D. Demonstrate and participate in tournament sparring.

IV. Basic Self-Defense

A. Demonstrate defense against rear holds.

B. Demonstrate defense frontal holds.

C. Demonstrate defense against unarmed attacks.

D. Demonstrate defense against armed attacks.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise and potentially dangerous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 168

  • Title: Karate IV*
  • Number: HPER 168
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 167; Note: Beginning Japanese is a suggested prerequisite.

Description:

Students in this course will have the opportunity to achieve the advanced level of karate in the following: taiso (exercise), kata (forms), kumite (sport/free fighting) and self-defense application. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Review and demonstrate the advanced techniques for the following routines: stances, blocks, strikes and kicks
  2. Review and demonstrate the “Dachi,” “Uke,” “Uchi” and “Geri” routines, as well as, the combination routines.
  3. Demonstrate tournament competition techniques with Kata (form) and Kumite (free fighting).
  4. Demonstrate the basic self-defense maneuvers.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Review of basic skills

A. Demonstrate all stances

B. Demonstrate all blocks

C. Demonstrate all strikes

D. Demonstrate all kicks 

E. Review the Japanese terminology and translations for all techniques.

II. Demonstrate routines and combination routines at the advanced level

A. Demonstrate the standing and moving forms of “Dachi.”

B. Demonstrate the standing and moving forms of “Uke.”

C. Demonstrate the standing and moving forms of “Uchi.”

D. Demonstrate the standing and moving forms of “Geri.”

E. Demonstrate the combination routines of blocking and striking.

F. Demonstrate the combination routines of blocking and kicking.

G. Demonstrate the combination routines of striking and kicking.

III. Preparing for competition

A. Discuss and demonstrate the forms of “Kata.”

1. Demonstrate the “taikioka” form of “Kata.”

2. Demonstrate the “Pinan Yondan form of “Kata.”

B. Discuss and demonstrate the techniques of “Kumite.”

C. Demonstrate and participate in endurance sparring.

D. Demonstrate and participate in tournament sparring.

IV. Advanced self-defense

A. Demonstrate defense against rear holds.

B. Demonstrate defense against frontal holds.

C. Demonstrate unarmed striking attacks in a defend and counter situation.

D. Demonstrate unarmed striking attacks in a direct encounter situation.

E. Demonstrate armed striking attacks in a defend and counter situation.

F. Demonstrate armed striking attacks in a direct encounter situation.

G. Demonstrate threatening weapons in a frontal attack situation.

H. Demonstrate threatening weapons in a rear attack situation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 172

  • Title: Track and Field (Beginning)
  • Number: HPER 172
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This course will introduce the student to the sport of track and field. Through activity and discussion the student will improve his or her motor ability to perform track and field events. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Analyze linear motion.
  2. Examine air resistance.
  3. Assess the concept of center of mass.
  4. Study the concept of curves of flight.
  5. Analyze inertia and momentum.
  6. Analyze the concept of rotary motion.
  7. Discuss the concept of in-flight rotation.
  8. Study centripetal and centrifugal forces.
  9. Examine the biomechanics of running.
  10. Analyze the biomechanics of track and field jumping events.
  11. Analyze the biomechanics of track and field throwing events.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Linear Motion

A. Explain and compare the concepts of speed and velocity.

B. Explain and compare the concepts of acceleration and deceleration.

II. Air Resistance

A. Examine air resistance in the running events.

B. Examine air resistance in the jumping events.

C. Examine air resistance in the throwing events.

III. Center of Mass

A. Recognize and differentiate the concepts of stability and balance.

B. Explain the concept of balance in motion.

IV. Curves in flight

A. Explain the parabolic curve.

B. Characterize the dynamics of aerodynamic flight.

C. Discuss the optimum angles of release for all throwing events.

D. Discuss the optimum angle of takeoff for horizontal jumping events.

V. Inertia and Momentum

A. Explain and discuss inertia.

B. Explain and discuss momentum.

C. Differentiate between inertia and momentum.

VI. Rotary Motion

A. Explain and discuss rotary motion.

B. Explain the primary and secondary axes.

VII. Flight Rotation

A. Describe rotation originating on the ground.

B. Describe rotation originating in the air.

VIII. Centripetal and Centrifugal Forces

A. Explain and differentiate between centripetal and centrifugal forces.

IX. Biomechanics of Running

A. Explain the running stride.

B. Describe stride length and stride frequency.

C. Describe and explain the techniques of hurdling.

D. Describe and explain the techniques of sprinting.

X. Biomechanics of Track and Field Jumping Events

A. Explain ground reaction for the High Jump, Pole Vault, Long Jump, and Triple Jump.

B. Diagram takeoff angles for the High Jump, Pole Vault, Long Jump and Triple Jump.

C. Diagram flight curves for the High Jump, Pole Vault, Long Jump and Triple Jump.

XI. Biomechanics of Track and Field Throwing Events

A. Explain release velocity for the shot put, discus, hammer and javelin.

B. Diagram the angle of release for the shot put, discus, hammer and javelin.

C. Explain the angle of attack for the shot put, discus, hammer and javelin.

D. Diagram the flight curves for the shot put, discus, hammer and javelin.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 174

  • Title: Coaching and Officiating of Track and Field
  • Number: HPER 174
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

Students will have the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of coaching and officiating track and field events. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be prepared for USATF Level 1 certification. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate coaching pedagogy for track and field.
  2. Select the correct teaching progression for each track and field event.
  3. Write a day-to-day practice schedule for one week for each track and field event.
  4. Develop a 12 week training plan for a track and field event.
  5. Write a yearly training outline of each track and field event.
  6. Set up a yearly strength and conditioning program for a track and field team.
  7. Define and demonstrate the proper officiating duties for each track and field event.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Track and Field Pedagogy

A. Outline and organize the duties of the track and field coach.

II. Teaching Progressions

A. Select the correct teaching progression for the following:

1. Sprints

2. Hurdles

3. Middle Distance Races

4. Distance Races

5. Relays

6. Long Jump

7. Triple Jump

8. Pole Vault

9. High Jump

10. Discus

11. Shot Put

12. Javelin

13. Hammer

III. Weekly Practice Plans

A. Complete a day-to-day practice schedule for one week for the following track and field events or event areas.

1. Sprints

2. Hurdles

3. Relays

4. Middle Distance

5. Distance

6. Vertical Jumps

7. Horizontal Jumps

8. Rotational Throws

9. Javelin

IV. Seasonal Training Programs

A. Complete an outline for a 12-13 week training plan for the following track and field events or event areas.

1. Sprints

2. Hurdles

3. Relays

4. Middle Distance

5. Distance

6. Vertical Jumps

7. Horizontal Jumps

8. Rotational Throws

9. Javelin

V. The yearly training cycle

A. Write a yearly training outline for the following track and field events or event areas.

1. Sprints

2. Hurdles

3. Relays

4. Middle Distance

5. Distance

6. Vertical Jumps

7. Horizontal Jumps

8. Rotational Throws

9. Javelin

VI. Strength and Conditioning for the Track and Field Athlete

A. Discuss and assimilate a yearly strength and conditioning regimen for a track and field team.

VII. Officiating Track and Field Events

A. List, in outline form, all of the officials required to run off a National Indoor or Outdoor Track Championship

B. Demonstrate the correct officiating technique for each event in track and field.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous and potentially dangerous activity

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 175

  • Title: Fencing
  • Number: HPER 175
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

Beginning foil fencing will provide the student with the fundamental rules and techniques of foil fencing. The student will utilize these skills in a fencing bout. The student will also be instructed in the rules and procedures of officiating foil fencing. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explain basic foil concepts, skills, rules and officiating.
  2. Demonstrate the basics of foil under supervision of the instructor.
  3. Demonstrate intermediate foil maneuvers under supervision of the instructor.
  4. Demonstrate and explain officiating skills under supervision by the lead instructor.
  5. Discuss foil competitions and demonstrate the modern sport of competitive fencing during a foil bout.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Foil concepts

A. Demonstrate the preparatory exercises.

B. Diagram the equipment used in foil.

C. Discuss and demonstrate safety issues.

D. Explain and demonstrate proper fencing attire, the weapons and equipment.

E. Demonstrate the proper grip and salute.

F. Demonstrate the “thrust to touch” maneuver.

G. Demonstrate the “thrust, advance to touch” maneuver.

II. Safety and Bladework

A. Review and demonstrate safety issues to foil activity.

B. Demonstrate the “En Garde” maneuver.

C. Demonstrate proper footwork.

D. Demonstrate the “thrust - touch” maneuver.

III. Intermediate Foot and Bladework

A. Review and demonstrate safety issues to foil activity.

B. Demonstrate the “thrust-parry-thrust” exercises.

C. Demonstrate the “parry-riposte standing” exercise.

D. Demonstrate the “parry-riposte, with lunge” exercise.

E. Demonstrate the “straight line lunge” exercise.

F. Demonstrate the “parry-riposte and straight thrust” exercise.

G. Demonstrate the “counterriposte” exercise.

H. Demonstrate and explain the “disengage” drill.

IV. Judging and Officiating

A. Discuss and explain the role of the director.

B. Discuss and explain the role of the judges.

C. Discuss and explain the rules.

D. Demonstrate officiating techniques.

V. Bouting

A. Demonstrate the core routine.

B. Demonstrate bouting.

C. Demonstrate bouting against the instructor.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 176

  • Title: Self Defense I
  • Number: HPER 176
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

The class will present students with a variety of techniques for escaping a physical attack. Students will receive an introduction to the four ranges of self-defense: ground, grappling, striking and weapons. Students will learn the principles that apply in any self-defense situation and the basic positions and structure of each range. The class is appropriate for beginners as well as those with previous self-defense or martial arts training. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Escape basic grabs.
  2. Fall and roll safely.
  3. Reverse basic ground positions.
  4. Throw and defend against basic strikes and kicks.
  5. Demonstrate basic attacks and defenses with weapons.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Single or Double Arm Grabs

A. Wrist Grabs.

1. Escape opposite side wrist grab

2. Escape same side wrist grab

B. Body Grabs.

1. Escape bear hug

2. Escape head lock

II. Falls and Rolls

A. Falls.

1. Perform a side break fall

2. Perform a rear break fall

3. Perform a front break fall

B. Rolls.

1. Perform a kneeling forward roll

2. Perform a standing forward roll

III. Basic Ground Positions

A. Mount.

1. Secure the position from on top

2. Reverse the position from below

B. Guard.

1. Secure an opponent in the position

a. Arm bar

b. Triangle choke

2. Escape from within the position

C. Cross Mount.

1. Secure the position from on top

a. Sit Out

b. Transition to Head Control

2. Reverse the position from below

D. Flow from Mount to Ride.

IV. Basic Strikes and Kicks

A. Punches.

1. Jab

a. Throw a jab

b. Defend against a jab

2. Cross.

a. Throw a cross

b. Defend against a cross

3. Hook.

a. Throw a hook

b. Defend against a hook

B. Elbows.

1. Throw an elbow

2. Defend against an elbow

C. Kicks.

1. Throw a kick

2. Defend against a kick

D. Knees.

1. Throw a knee

2. Defend against a knee

V. Weapons

A. Basic Angles.

1. Perform five attacks

2. Perform five defenses

B. Disarm an attacker.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

60-70%    Attendance and Active Participation
20-30%    5-10 In Class Demonstrations
5-10%      1-2 Written Examinations

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. The practice of self-defense skills requires varying degrees and kinds of physical contact with other students. Even though the practice will be controlled and supervised, the possibility of injury still exists. Anyone enrolling in the class should do so fully aware of the risk of injury.
  2. Strenuous activity: students will be expected to fall repeatedly from kneeling and standing positions.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 177

  • Title: Self Defense II*
  • Number: HPER 177
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 176.

Description:

This class will build on techniques introduced in Self Defense I, adding new techniques, combining techniques and applying the techniques in a variety of scenarios. Emphasis remains on the principles that apply at any range as well as drills to develop proper structure and mechanics. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Perform basic sweeps and throws.
  2. Reverse advanced ground positions.
  3. Throw punches and kicks in combinations.
  4. Counter basic grabs.
  5. Demonstrate basic knife defenses.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sweeps, Throws, Falls

A. Perform sweeps with a partner.

1. Inner leg sweep

2. Outer leg sweep

B. Perform throws with a partner.

1. Rice bag throw

2. Hip throw

C. Perform falls from different angles.

1. Rolling slide break fall

2. Rolling back break fall

II. Ground Positions

A. Demonstrate head control with a partner.

1. Secure the position from on top

2. Escape the position from below

B. Demonstrate side mount with a partner.

1. Secure the position from on top

2. Escape the position from below

C. Demonstrate ride with a partner.

1. Secure the position from behind

a. Rear choke

b. Arm bar

2. Escape the position from in front

III. Strikes and Kicks

A. Throw combinations of punches.

1. Jab, cross, and hook

2. Punches and elbows

B. Throw combinations of elbows.

1. Multiple elbows

2. Elbows and knees

C. Throw combinations of kicks.

1. Multiple kicks

2. Punches and kicks

D. Throw combinations of knees.

1. Multiple knees

2. Punches and knees

IV. Grabs and Locks

A. Perform grab escapes and counters with a partner.

1. Single wrist grab

2. Double wrist grab

3. Lapel grab

B. Perform locks with a partner.

1. Wrist lock

2. Elbow lock

3. Shoulder lock

V. Weapons

A. Perform two weapon drills alone with a partner.

B. Demonstrate the use of a knife.

1. Demonstrate basic angles of attack and defense

2. Disarm an attacker

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

60-70%    Attendance and Active Participation
20-30%    5-10 In Class Demonstrations
5-10%      1-2 Written Examinations

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. The practice of self defense skills requires varying degrees and kinds of physical contact with other students. Even though the practice will be controlled and supervised, the possibility of injury still exists. Anyone enrolling in the class should do so fully aware of the risk of injury.
  2. Strenuous activity: students will be expected to fall repeatedly from kneeling and standing positions.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 185

  • Title: Archery
  • Number: HPER 185
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

Students will receive individualized instruction in the basic skills of archery as a recreational sport lending itself as a lifetime leisure interest. Safety, fundamental care and usage of archery tackle, and beginning archery skills will be taught, along with a survey of the history of archery. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. List and describe basic knowledge of archery terminology and equipment.
  2. Demonstrate the strength to shoot a minimum of eight “ends” of archery during class.
  3. Demonstrate the safety procedures for shooting while on the archery range.
  4. Execute accurate shots at various angles and distances from a target by scoring a minimum of 70% on a shooting skills test.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Archery Terminology and Equipment

A. List and describe the assigned terms used in archery.

B. Describe the equipment used in archery.

II. Shooting

A. Demonstrate “bracing the bow” technique.

B. Demonstrate the “stance” technique.

C. Demonstrate “nocking the arrow” technique.

D. Demonstrate the “grip and draw” technique.

E. Explain the purpose of and demonstrate the finding of the “anchor point.”

F. Explain and demonstrate “aiming.”

G. Demonstrate the “release and follow-through.”

III. Safety in Shooting

A. Explain the unsafe practices of “dry-firing.”

B. Discuss the safety issues inherent to proper selection of equipment.

C. Discuss the safety issues inherent to target selection and the surrounding area(s).

IV. Skills Test

A. Demonstrate a 70% accuracy in shooting from various angles.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous and potentially dangerous activity

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 192

  • Title: Wellness for Life
  • Number: HPER 192
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

This course introduces students to the theory and principles upon which the concepts of lifetime fitness and wellness are based. Students will examine the relationship that exists between wellness and lifestyle behaviors. Individual self-assessments will be used to establish current health and fitness levels. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Identify and compare the components of fitness and wellness to lifestyle management.
  2. Analyze the basic principles of physical fitness.
  3. Investigate and explain cardiorespiratory endurance and cardiovascular health.
  4. Investigate and explain muscular strength and muscular endurance.
  5. Outline the wellness benefits of flexibility.
  6. Summarize the process of determining body composition.
  7. Develop a complete fitness program.
  8. Research and explain the basics of nutrition.
  9. Discuss weight management.
  10. Identify and discuss stress.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fitness, Wellness and Your Lifestyle Management.

A. List the components of wellness.

B. Assess the individual's lifestyle in relationship to fitness and wellness.

II. Basic Principles of Physical Fitness

A. List the components of physical fitness.

B. Describe the concept of “specificity” in physical training.

C. Describe the concept of “progressive overload” in physical training.

D. Describe the concept of “reversibility” in physical training.

E. Design an exercise program.

F. Compare fitness benefits to health benefits.

G. Calculate the individual's activity index.

III. Cardiorespiratory Endurance

A. List and explain the benefits of cardiorespiratory fitness.

B. Assess and interpret an individuals cardiorespiratory fitness.

C. Develop a Cardiorespiratory endurance program.

IV. Muscular Strength and Muscular Endurance

A. Describe the benefits of muscular strength.

B. Explain the benefits of muscular endurance.

C. Differentiate between muscular strength and muscular endurance.

D. Assess and interpret an individuals muscular strength and muscular endurance.

E. Discuss the fundamentals of endurance weight training.

F. Discuss the fundamentals of strength weight training.

G. Develop a weight training program.

V. Flexibility

A. List the benefits of flexibility exercises.

B. Characterize the determining factors of flexibility.

C. Assess and interpret an individuals flexibility.

D. Create an individual flexibility program.

VI. The fitness program

A. Investigate popular fitness programs.

B. Review and redefine the individual's personal fitness program.

VII. Nutrition

A. Define the components of a healthy diet.

B. Discuss the varying presentations of nutritional guidelines.

C. Apply nutritional principles to the individuals personal fitness program.

VIII. Weight Management

A. Outline health implications of an individual that is overweight or obese.

B. List factors that contribute to a weight problem.

C. Dissect the problems with the search of the “perfect body.”

D. Outline strategies for losing weight.

E. Create an individual weight-management plan.

IX. Stress

A. Determine what stress encompasses.

B. Estimate the effect stress contributes to disease.

C. Format a stress-management program.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-70%    Tests and Final Exam
20-50%    Projects
15-25%    Quizzes/Lab Assignment/Homework

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Students will be asked to perform self-assessments on wellness components. These will be necessary in order to complete assignments and participate in class activities

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 194

  • Title: Sports Conditioning (Beginning)
  • Number: HPER 194
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

Students will have the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of general and sports-specific conditioning. All aspects of physical and psychological development are incorporated in this class. Strength, power, speed, acceleration, muscular hypertrophy and endurance, cardiovascular endurance, motor skills and agility drills are taught and practiced. The class will include general physical preparation sport fitness, plyometrics, agility drills and sport-related specific conditioning. The students will learn about the principle of year-round conditioning, including conditioning appropriate to the off-season, preparatory period, pre-competition period and competition period. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Identify terminology necessary to plan and explain a sports conditioning program.
  2. Recognize and explain the uses of various exercise apparatus.
  3. Perform drills at a level commensurate with established norms according to age, sex, sport, and base level of training.
  4. Explain which exercises are to be used to develop particular body regions.
  5. Explain which exercises are to be used in order to develop specific physical performance qualities.
  6. Name the various muscles used while performing specific drills.
  7. Identify and explain the basic principles to be applied when choosing exercises for developing particular physical performance qualities such as strength, power, speed, muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance and flexibility/mobility.
  8. Perform stretching exercises which develop flexibility and mobility of the various muscle groups and body segments.
  9. Identify and explain the psychological qualities necessary for successful training performance.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Sports Conditioning

A. Review the course outline and methods of instruction.

B. Define the term “sports conditioning.”

C. Define and differentiate the terms “strength,” “muscular endurance,” “cardio-vascular endurance,” “speed,” “power,” “flexibility,” “mobility.”

II. Introduction to Sports Conditioning Exercises and Technique

A. Explain and demonstrate the proper biomechanical principles and body postures necessary to properly and safely perform sports conditioning exercises.

B. Explain the need for and use of proper equipment, clothing and footwear in sports conditioning.

III. Introduction to Sports Resistance Training

A. Identify and demonstrate exercises designed to increase strength, muscular endurance, and size of the upper limbs, upper back and chest.

B. Identify and demonstrate exercises designed to increase strength, muscular endurance and size of the lower limbs, hips and lower back.

C. Identify and demonstrate exercises designed to increase strength, muscular endurance and size of the abdominal/midsection/”core” region.

D. Explain the basic concepts utilized in the development of strength, muscular endurance, and muscular size for sports.

IV. Introduction to Sports Speed and Power (Explosiveness) Training

A. Define the term “plyometrics.”

B. Identify and demonstrate exercises designed to increase speed and power of the upper limbs, upper back and chest.

C. Identify and demonstrate exercises designed to develop power of the lower limbs, hips, and lower back.

D. Identify and demonstrate exercises designed to develop power of the abdominal/midsection “core” region.

E. Explain the basic concepts utilized in the development of speed and power for sports.

V. Introduction to Sports Flexibility/Mobility Training

A. Identify and demonstrate exercises designed to develop flexibility and mobility of the upper limbs, upper back and chest.

B. Identify and demonstrate exercises designed to develop flexibility and mobility of the lower limbs, hips and lower back.

C. Identify and demonstrate exercises designed to develop flexibility and mobility of the abdominal/midsection “core” region.

D. Explain the basic concepts used in the development of flexibility/mobility for sports.

VI. Introduction to Sports Cardiovascular Conditioning

A. Identify and demonstrate exercise routines designed to develop the cardiovascular system of the athlete.

B. Explain the basic concepts used in the development of cardiovascular endurance for sports.

VII. Introduction to Periodization Training

A. Explain the concept of periodization for sports conditioning.

B. Explain and differentiate the several phases of periodization, to include off-season, preparatory, pre-competition, and competition season periods of training.

VIII. Introduction to the Psychology of Physical Training for sports.

A. Identify factors associated with the psychological aspect of sports conditioning.

B. Identify personal motivational style.

C. Identify factors which improve personal motivation.

D. Identify factors which hamper personal motivation.

E. Explain several techniques which may be utilized in the improvement of personal preparation for an ongoing regimen of intensive sports conditioning.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 195

  • Title: Introduction to Sports Medicine
  • Number: HPER 195
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The purpose of this class is to introduce the basic concepts of sports medicine, specifically Athletic Training. It will address the fundamentals of the human musculoskeletal system, sports-related injuries, injury treatment and other sports medicine-related topics. This class is designed for beginning athletic training students and other students interested in the subject. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate familiarity with sports medicine terminology.
  2. Describe the qualifications and responsibilities of each member of the sports medicine team.
  3. Discuss the basic tenets of sports injury law.
  4. Identify and describe basic human joint articulations, ligaments and cartilages.
  5. Describe methods of recognizing sport injury to the human musculoskeletal system.
  6. Explain and demonstrate basic sports injury first aid and injury treatment.
  7. Explain and demonstrate the use of universal precautions regarding bloodborne pathogens.
  8. Demonstrate basic athletic taping procedures used on athletic injuries.
  9. Describe basic general health-related issues and conditions as they apply to athletes.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sports Medicine Terminology

A. Identify the major bony landmarks.

B. Describe terms of direction and function.

C. Recognize and describe joint classifications.

D. Recognize and describe injury classifications.

E. Recognize and describe illness classifications.

F. Identify and describe the superficial muscles.

II. The Sports Medicine Team

A. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the medical practitioners involved in the sports medicine team.

1. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the M.D. in regards to the sports medicine team.

2. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the D.O. in regards to the sports medicine team.

3. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the D.C. in regards to the sports medicine team.

4. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the O.D. in regards to the sports medicine team.

5. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the D.D.S. in regards to the sports medicine team.

6. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the D.M.M. in regards to the sports medicine team.

7. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of specialists in regards to the sports medicine team.

B. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the medical professionals involved in the sports medicine team.

1. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the ATC/LAT in regards to the sports medicine team.

2. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the PT/LPT in regards to the sports medicine team.

3. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the RN/LNP in regards to the sports medicine team.

4. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the PA in regards to the sports medicine team.

5. Describe and list the qualifications and responsibilities of the LMT in regards to the sports medicine team.

C. Describe and list the roles of the support persons involved in the sports medicine team.

1. Describe and list the roles of the coaches in regards to the sports medicine team.

2. Describe and list the roles of the teammates in regards to the sports medicine team.

3. Describe and list the roles of the parents in regards to the sports medicine team.

4. Describe and list the roles of the siblings in regards to the sports medicine team.

5. Describe and list the roles of others in regards to the sports medicine team.

III. Tort Law and Record Keeping

A. Define basic tort law terminology.

B. Discuss and apply basic record-keeping methods.

IV. Injury Assessment

A. Describe inflammation.

B. Differentiate between the levels of pain.

C. Identify deformity.

D. Identify dysfunction.

E. Describe signs and symptoms.

V. Sports First Aid and Basic Injury Care

A. Explain and demonstrate the correct application of RICE.

B. Describe and demonstrate wound care techniques.

C. Discuss and describe bleeding control.

D. Demonstrate basic injury stabilization methods.

E. List and describe therapeutic modalities used in sports medicine.

VI. Athletic Taping and Wrapping

A. Demonstrate efficient handling of athletic tape.

B. Describe and demonstrate pre-taping preparation.

C. Demonstrate specific tapings and wraps.

VII. General Health Concerns of Athletes

A. Identify and discuss playing environment issues.

1. Identify and discuss heat-related issues.

2. Identify and discuss cold-related issues.

3. Identify and discuss lightning safety.

B. Explain proper hydration practices for athletes.

C. Discuss facility safety.

D. List and describe common illnesses and non-injury conditions suffered by athletes.

E. Identify common skin conditions of athletes.

F. Discuss the effect on athletes of chronic illnesses and conditions.

G. Discuss emergency planning.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

4 tests worth 100 points each
Assignments-given weekly, 15 points each
Quizzes-generally 10 points each
1 project-50 points

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 197

  • Title: Sports Conditioning (Intermediate)*
  • Number: HPER 197
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 194.

Description:

Students will have the opportunity to build upon principles and practices of general and sports-specific conditioning learned in Beginning Sports Conditioning. All aspects of physical and psychological development are incorporated in this class. Strength, power, speed, acceleration, muscular hypertrophy and endurance, cardiovascular endurance, motor skills and agility drills are taught and practiced. The class will include general physical preparation, sport fitness and conditioning. Students will continue to learn about the principle of year-round conditioning, including conditioning appropriate to the off-season, preparatory period, pre-competition period and competition period. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Utilize terminology necessary to plan and explain a sports conditioning program.
  2. Recognize and explain the uses of various exercise apparatus.
  3. Choose proper apparatus for specific conditioning activities.
  4. Perform drills at a level commensurate with established norms according to age, sex, sport and base level of training.
  5. Choose and implement exercises to be used to develop particular body regions.
  6. Choose and implement which exercises are to be used in order to develop specific physical performance qualities.
  7. Name the various muscles and their functions, which are used while performing specific drills.
  8. Explain and demonstrate the basic principles to be applied when choosing exercises for developing particular physical performance qualities such as strength, power, speed, muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance, and flexibility/mobility.
  9. Choose and perform stretching exercises which develop flexibility and mobility of the various muscle groups and body segments.
  10. Explain, choose and implement specific techniques which may be used to enhance the psychological qualities necessary for successful training performance.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Sports Conditioning (Int)

A. Review the course outline and methods of instruction.

B. Review and reinforce the terms “strength,” “muscular endurance,” “cardiovascular endurance,” “speed,” “power,” “flexibility,” “mobility.”

II. Sports Conditioning Exercises and Technique

A. Demonstrate and implement the proper biomechanical principles and body postures necessary to properly and safely perform sports conditioning exercises.

B. Demonstrate and implement use of proper equipment, clothing and footwear in sports conditioning.

III. Sports Resistance Training

A. Demonstrate and implement exercises designed to increase strength, muscular endurance and size of the upper limbs, upper back and chest.

B. Demonstrate and implement exercises designed to increase strength, muscular endurance and size of the lower limbs, hips, and lower back.

C. Demonstrate and implement exercises designed to increase strength, muscular endurance and size of the abdominal/midsection/”core” region.

D. Implement concepts utilized in the development of strength, muscular endurance and muscular size for sports.

IV. Sports Speed and Power (Explosiveness) Training

A. Demonstrate and implement plyometric exercises within a sports conditioning program.

B. Demonstrate and implement exercises designed to increase speed and power of the upper limbs, upper back and chest.

C. Demonstrate and implement exercises designed to develop power of the lower limbs, hips and lower back.

D. Demonstrate and implement exercises designed to develop power of the abdominal/midsection “core” region.

E. Implement concepts utilized in the development of speed and power for sports.

V. Sports Flexibility/Mobility Training

A. Demonstrate and implement exercises designed to develop flexibility and mobility of the upper limbs, upper back and chest.

B. Demonstrate and implement exercises designed to develop flexibility and mobility of the lower limbs, hips and lower back.

C. Demonstrate and implement exercises designed to develop flexibility and mobility of the abdominal/midsection “core” region.

D. Implement concepts used in the development of flexibility/mobility for sports.

VI. Sports Cardiovascular Conditioning

A. Demonstrate and implement exercise routines designed to develop the cardiovascular system of the athlete.

B. Implement concepts used in the development of cardiovascular endurance for sports.

VII. Periodization Training

A. Reiterate the concept of periodization for sports conditioning.

B. Utilize the several phases of periodization, to include off-season, preparatory, pre-competition, and competition season periods of training within the context of a year-round sports conditioning program.

VIII. The Psychology of Physical Training for Sports

A. Identify and analyze factors associated with the psychological aspect of sports conditioning.

B. Identify and evaluate personal motivational style.

C. Identify and evaluate factors which improve personal motivation.

D. Identify and evaluate factors which hamper personal motivation.

E. Implement several techniques which may be utilized in the improvement of personal preparation for an ongoing regimen of intensive sports conditioning.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30%    Written Exams
20-30%    Skill Development Tests
0-10%      Projects

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 198

  • Title: Athletic Training Practicum I*
  • Number: HPER 198
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 128
  • Lecture Hours: 16
  • Other Hours: 112

Requirements:

Corequisites: HPER 195.

Description:

At the conclusion of this practicum, the student will be able to explain and demonstrate a variety of basic principles and practices in athletic training, including the essentials of record keeping, athletic injury taping and strapping techniques, an introduction to the supervised use of and safety procedures for therapeutic modalities and therapeutic exercise equipment. Major anatomical landmarks and basic anatomy of the major joints of the human body will be identified and palpated. This practicum, intended for athletic training and other allied health students, will be hands-on and conducted under the direct supervision of a certified/licensed athletic trainer. 16 hrs. lecture, 112 hrs. practicum.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explain and discuss the basic policies and procedures of the athletic training room.
  2. Demonstrate basic proficiency with computerized athletic training record keeping.
  3. Demonstrate improving proficiency in taping and strapping techniques for upper and lower extremity injuries.
  4. Demonstrate the care of minor wounds and universal infection/contamination prevention procedures.
  5. Demonstrate basic techniques for the care of acute injuries in athletes and others.
  6. Demonstrate the proper application of cold, warm, electrical stimulation and ultrasound modalities.
  7. Explain the essential differences between warm and cold therapy modalities.
  8. Demonstrate the correct utilization of basic athletic training room rehabilitation equipment.
  9. Demonstrate proper care and cleaning procedures for all athletic training room equipment.
  10. Identify and palpate the major bony anatomical landmarks.
  11. Describe the basic anatomy of the major moveable joints of the human body.
  12. Complete a minimum 128 hours in the athletic training room. (8 hours/week)

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Athletic Training Room Policies and Procedures

A. Discuss and explain standard athletic training room policies.

B. Discuss and explain standard athletic training room procedures.

C. Discuss and explain issues related to privacy.

II. The Basics of Record Keeping

A. Explain and demonstrate proficiency in basic athletic training record keeping methods and protocols.

B. Explain and demonstrate basic electronic record keeping.

III. Human Orthopedic Anatomy

A. Identify and palpate major bony landmarks.

B. Identify and describe types of cartilage.

C. Identify, describe and palpate various ligaments.

D. Identify, describe and define various joint classifications.

VI. First Aid and Immediate Injury Treatment

A. Explain and demonstrate basic sports injury first aid and injury treatment.

B. Identify and explain injury classifications.

C. Describe and demonstrate acute care of injuries to athletes.

D. Describe and demonstrate control of acute swelling.

E. Describe and demonstrate basic wound care.

V. Athletic Taping and Wrapping

A. Demonstrate basic athletic taping procedures as used with athletic injuries.

B. Describe and demonstrate the proper handling of athletic tape.

C. Describe and demonstrate pre-taping preparation.

D. Demonstrate specific specialized tapings and wraps.

VI. Therapeutic Modalities

A. Explain and demonstrate basic, safe application of therapeutic modalities.

B. Describe heat treatments-indications/contraindications.

C. Describe cold treatments-indications/contraindications.

D. Describe correct techniques of the application of therapeutic ultrasound-indications/contraindications.

E. Describe basic techniques of the application of electrical neuromuscular stimulation- indications/contraindications.

F. Describe and demonstrate the proper care and handling of therapeutic modality equipment.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

25-50%    2-4 Examinations
50-75%    1-3 Projects/Assignments

Total:   100%  

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 200

  • Title: First Aid and CPR
  • Number: HPER 200
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

After completing this course, students should be able to perform the basic skills of first aid. The course will cover cause, prevention and first aid care of common emergencies. Certification may be earned in first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillators (AED). 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of first aid and emergency care.
  2. List and describe the process for assessing a victim.
  3. Identify life-threatening emergencies and demonstrate procedures for caring for the victim.
  4. Explain and demonstrate appropriate techniques in automated external defibrillators for the adult, child and infant.
  5. List and describe various bodily injuries, and demonstrate the necessary care.
  6. Differentiate the various sudden illnesses and describe care procedures.
  7. Identify special situations in which emergency care may be necessary.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to First Aid in Emergency Care

A. Identify the role of the first aid provider

B. Identify the legal considerations involved in emergency care by nonmedical providers.

C. List and describe actions required at an emergency.

D. Define precautions involved with bloodborne and airborne diseases including hepatitis B and C, HIV and TB

II. Assessing the Victim

A. Differentiate the different body systems and how they function, including respiratory, circulatory, nervous, skeletal, muscular and skin.

B. Explain and demonstrate the “A, B, C” steps of the primary survey.

C. List and describe the general procedures for assessing a conscious victim including physical exam and victim history

III. Life-Threatening Emergencies

A. Explain and demonstrate cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

B. Explain and demonstrate the first aid care required for respiratory emergencies.

C. Explain and demonstrate how to provide first aid care for airway obstruction.

D. List and describe the care and prevention of shock.

E. Explain and demonstrate the management of bleeding.

F. Explain and demonstrate appropriate techniques in automated external defibrillators.

IV.Injuries

A. List and describe the various wounds and their first aid care: abrasions, lacerations, incisions, punctures, avulsions and amputations.

B. Identify the signs, symptoms and care of infection.

C. Explain and demonstrate the procedures of applying a dressing.

D. Explain and demonstrate the various bandaging techniques.

E. Differentiate the classifications and first aid care for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degree burns.

F. Differentiate the first aid care for chemical, electrical, thermal and radiation burns.

G. Define and describe head and spinal injuries and how to provide first aid care.

H. Differentiate chest, abdominal and pelvis injuries and their first aid care.

I. List and describe the first aid necessary for victims with injuries sustained to the bones, joints, and muscles including; fractures, strains, sprains, dislocations.

J. Define RICE care for injuries to the extremities.

K. Identify the different types of splints.

L. Explain and demonstrate the procedures of applying a splint to a victim.

V. Medical Emergencies

A. Differentiate various sudden illnesses and emergencies, including heart attack, stroke, asthma, seizures and diabetic emergencies.

B. Describe first aid care for sudden illnesses and emergencies, including heart attack, stroke, asthma, seizures and diabetic emergencies.

C. Identify ingested, inhaled, injected and absorbed poisonings and toxic reactions.

D. Describe first aid care for ingested, inhaled, injected and absorbed poisoning and toxic reactions.

E. Differentiate cold-related illnesses and emergencies.

F. Describe first aid care for cold-related illnesses and emergencies.

G. Differentiate heat-related illnesses and emergencies.

H. Describe first aid care for heat-related illnesses and emergencies.

VI. Emergency Care Skills and Disaster Preparedness

A. Demonstrate rescue and transfer maneuvers.

B. Describe natural disasters and the safety procedures to take if you encounter one of these disasters.

C. Describe the safety procedures to take if you encounter a terrorism attack involving chemical, biological, nuclear, radiological weapons or an active shooter.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-70%    Tests and Final Exam
20-50%    Projects
15-25%    Quizzes/Lab Assignment/Homework

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Physical activity is required for in-class physical demonstrations.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 202

  • Title: Personal Community Health
  • Number: HPER 202
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and understanding to make positive, healthy lifestyle choices. In addition, students will learn about issues within the community that affect their daily health, both directly and indirectly. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Examine personal health habits.
  2. Identify communicable disease(s).
  3. Identify the immune process and the infectious disease process.
  4. Recognize and differentiate the major sexually transmitted diseases.
  5. Recognize the causes, symptoms, treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases.
  6. Recognize the causes, symptoms, treatment and prevention of various types of cancer.
  7. Discuss the various factors in involved in the development of intimate relationships.
  8. Identify and differentiate the male and female reproductive systems.
  9. Compare and contrast the major types of contraception.
  10. Discuss the legal and moral considerations of abortion and the methods and complications involved.
  11. Explain the major characteristics involved with pregnancy and childbirth.
  12. Evaluate the major considerations involved with the concept of dying and death.
  13. Identify how one makes responsible decisions in regard to substance use and abuse.
  14. Recognize responsible decisions in alcohol use and abuse.
  15. Determine the negative effects of tobacco and environmental tobacco smoke.
  16. Identify the components of a healthy diet and recognize proper nutritional guidelines.
  17. Identify the health advantages of exercise and activity.
  18. Recognize the basic concepts of weight management.
  19. Recognize the skills necessary for good consumer healthcare.
  20. Identify the factors that contribute to a positive healthcare system.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Unit 1

A. Identify and differentiate the “Dimensions of Wellness.”

B. Recognize the five leading causes of death today.

C. Identify and differentiate the “Dimensions of Wellness.”

D. Identify the broad national goals in Healthy People 2000.

E. Recognize the five leading causes of death today, and the lifestyle factors that affect each of them.

F. Identify the various components involved with health behavior change.

G. Recognize the steps involved in the “chain of infection.”

H. Recognize the body’s physical and chemical barriers to infection.

I. Develop an understanding of “the inflammatory response.”

J. Understand the concept of “immunity.”

K. Identify and differentiate the various causative agents and pathogens that cause infection and disease.

L. Differentiate the common communicable diseases discussed in the text.

M. List the reasons of the increase in the incidence of STDs.

N. Identify the seven major STDs and describe their causes, symptoms and potential effects.

O. Develop an understanding of HIV infection and AIDS.

P. Identify the methods of prevention against STDs.

Q. Recognize the methods of transmission of HIV and high-risk groups.

R. Describe the symptoms of HIV, types of tests, current treatments and how HIV can be prevented.

S. Recognize the No. 1 killer in the United States.

T. Identify the risk factors of heart disease including the four major factors you can control, as well as the four risk factors you cannot control and other contributing factors.

U. Identify the various treatments for cardiovascular disease.

V. Differentiate rheumatic, congenital and congestive heart disease.

W. Recognize the important steps involved in protecting oneself against CVD.

X. Identify the causes and types of “stroke,” as well as the risk factors and warning signals associated with it.

Y. Define and recognize the terms associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension and heart attacks.

Z. State the common definition of cancer and recognize when a person is considered “cured” of cancer.

AA. Identify the risk factors of cancer and the early detection “warning signals.”

BB. Recognize the nutritional factors thought to decrease the risk of cancer.

CC. Recognize the three leading types of cancer causing death in men and women.

DD. Identify several common carcinogens and how we can protect ourselves against them.

EE. Identify the major treatment techniques for cancer.

FF. Identify the principles of cancer prevention.

II. Unit 2

A. Recognize the various components included in the definition of “sexuality.”

B. Identify the structures and functions of the male and female reproductive systems..

C. Recognize the various components included in the definition of “sexuality.”

D. Identify the structures and functions of the male and female reproductive systems.

E. Develop a basic understanding of the menstrual cycle and the terms associated with it.

F. Identify the characteristics of Masters and Johnson’s four phases of sexual response.

G. Differentiate the major sexual dysfunctions and disorders.

H. Identify the factors involved in the development of sexual behavior such as gender role, gender identity and androgyny.

I. Identify and differentiate the various types of sexual orientation.

J. Recognize the varieties of human sexual behavior.

K. Identify the guidelines for safe responsible sexual behavior.

L. Compare and contrast the methods of contraception in terms of their effectiveness, risks, major advantages and disadvantages (identify “new” methods of contraception).

M. Recognize the varieties of human sexual behavior.

N. Recognize the stages of pregnancy and birth, prenatal care, and potential complications that can occur during pregnancy and childbirth.

O. Recognize some of the causes and treatments of infertility.

P. Identify the operations that cause sterility.

Q. Recognize the stages of labor and delivery and the characteristics of the postpartum period.

R. Differentiate clinical and cellular death.

S. Recognize the emotional, spiritual, and social dimensions of death.

T. Identify Elizabeth Kubler-Ross’ five stages of dying.

U. Identify the characteristics of the hospice concept.

V. Define the terms “living will,” “advance directives” and “active/passive euthanasia.”

W. Identify the phases of “grief” and how to support those dealing with it.

III. Unit 3

A. Define stress, differentiate good and bad stress, and identify the sources of stress in our life.

B. Differentiate type-A and type-B personalities.

C. Define stress, differentiate good and bad stress, and identify the sources of stress in our life.

D. Differentiate type-A and type-B personalities.

E. Develop an understanding of the general adaptation syndrome (GAS).

F. Identify the major life changes that are stressful for most people (Holmes-Rahe).

G. Identify the relation of stress to the diseases discussed in the text.

H. Recognize some of the different strategies that can be used to manage stress.

I. Identify Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.

J. Recognize the specific qualities that most self-actualized people share.

K. Recognize Erick Erickson’s eight stages of development.

L. Be able to define and differentiate the defense mechanisms found in the text.

M. Identify and differentiate the anxiety disorders discussed in the text.

N. Identify and differentiate the mood disorders discussed in the text.

O. Differentiate the four models of human nature and therapeutic change.

P. Recognize the major types of therapies for emotional disturbances.

Q. Differentiate the terms associated with drugs; tolerance, addiction, dependence, withdrawal, psychoactive drugs, etc.

R. Identify the five levels of drug use.

S. Recognize the major routes of administration of drugs.

T. Identify the various reasons why people take drugs.

U. Recognize the definition of “a drink” and “proof.”

V. Define the term BAC.

W. Recognize the “myths” about alcohol.

X. Identify the effects of chronic alcohol use on the digestive and cardiovascular systems and during pregnancy.

Y. Differentiate alcohol abuse from alcohol dependence.

Z. Recognize the warning signs of alcohol abuse.

AA. Recognize the treatments for alcoholism.

BB. Recognize the percentage of people that experience major alcohol problems.

CC. Recognize the gender and ethnic differences involved with alcohol abuse.

DD. Identify the factors involved with nicotine addiction (loss of control, tolerance, withdrawal and secondary reinforcers).

EE. Be aware of the effects of smoke on non-smokers.

FF. Recognize the long-term effects of smoking in regard to cardiovascular disease, lung cancer and COLD.

GG. Identify the dangers of smokeless tobacco, cigars, pipes and clove cigarettes.

HH. Identify the benefits of quitting smoking.

II. Recognize the various ways and steps the tobacco user can use to quit.

JJ. List the major categories of psychoactive drugs and describe their effects, methods of use, and potential for abuse and dependence.

IV. Unit 4

A. Identify the seven categories of essential nutrients recognizing their functions and characteristics, as well as the food sources they come from.

B. Differentiate “complete” and “incomplete” proteins.

C. Study chapters 12, 13, 14 and 22.

D. Identify the seven categories of essential nutrients recognizing their functions and characteristics, as well as the food sources they come from.

E. Differentiate “complete” and “incomplete” proteins.

F. Identify the types and sources of fats (essential-storage, saturated-unsaturated, HDL-LDL).

G. Identify the functions and sources of simple and complex carbohydrates.

H. Recognize the functions and sources of soluble and insoluble fiber.

I. Differentiate fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins, and recognize the signs of prolonged deficiency of vitamins A, C, D, thiamin and niacin.

J. Identify the number and functions of minerals in the diet.

K. Recognize the three minerals most commonly lacking in the American diet.

L. Identify the significance of the “food guide pyramid.”

M. Differentiate the four types of vegetarians.

N. Recognize the dietary challenges for specific population groups.

O. Recognize “food labels” and identify the functions of food additives.

P. Differentiate the skill-related components and the health-related components of physical fitness.

Q. Recognize the psychological, physiological and social benefits of exercise and fitness.

R. Differentiate aerobic from anaerobic exercise.

S. Identify the terms intensity, duration and frequency as they relate to strength and endurance exercise programs.

T. Identify the components of the “physical activity pyramid.”

U. Describe the basic concepts of weight management.

V. Differentiate the more common methods of assessing your body composition.

W. Identify the various factors and theories that contribute to weight problems.

X. Differentiate the characteristics concerning the eating disorders discussed in the text.

Y. Identify the myths of “exercise and fitness” and “diet and nutrition.”

Z. Recognize the conventional medical practitioners.

AA. Identify and differentiate the common medical specialists.

BB. Recognize some of the common unconventional approaches to healthcare.

CC. Identify the concepts and functions of an HMO, a PPO, and a POS plan.

DD. Recognize medical quackery and what agencies are available for protection.

EE. Identify and differentiate health insurance concepts, Medicare and Medicaid.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-70%    Tests and Final Exam
20-50%    Projects
15-25%    Quizzes/Lab Assignment/Homework

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 204

  • Title: Care and Prevention of Athletic Injury
  • Number: HPER 204
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries will focus on recognition, evaluation, treatment and recording of common athletic injuries. Human anatomy will be emphasized through the understanding of athletic movements and physical testing. Additional topics include legal and ethical practices for the athletic trainer and the psychology of today's competitive athlete. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries is the basic sports medicine class required by most exercise science and coaching degree programs. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe and demonstrate policies and procedures in the athletic training room.
  2. Describe and demonstrate basic biomechanical evaluation skills.
  3. Describe and demonstrate injury treatment modalities.
  4. Discuss theory regarding sports injury rehabilitation.
  5. Describe and demonstrate basic sports injury rehabilitation exercises.
  6. Demonstrate taping, wrapping and bracing for athletic injuries.
  7. Discuss the concept of mechanism of injury.
  8. Explain physical restrictions associated with athletic injuries.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge of advanced human orthopedic anatomy.
  10. Discuss the psychological aspects of sports injury.
  11. Explain and demonstrate athletic injury documentation.
  12. Explain and discuss ethical and legal practice for sports medicine professionals.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Human Orthopedic Anatomy

A. Identify and describe the joints of the body.

B. Describe the structures and functions of the ligaments.

C. Identify and describe capsular structures.

D. Identify and describe articular cartilages.

E. Identify bony landmarks.

II. Injury Assessment Methods

A. Explain and discuss and history gathering.

B. Identify and discuss injury mechanisms.

C. Describe assessment of the athlete’s level of disability.

III. Specific Injuries to Common to Athletes

A. Describe injuries to the axial region.

B. Describe injuries to the upper extremity.

C. Describe injuries to the lower extremity.

D. Describe illnesses and conditions common to athletes.

E. Discuss issues related to the environments in which athletes train and play.

F. Demonstrate taping and bracing techniques.

IV. Legal Issues and Professional Ethics Surrounding Athletic Training/Sports Medicine

A. Discuss tort law.

B. Discuss privacy issues.

C. Discuss the process of ethical decision-making as it is related to the injuries and illnesses of athletes.

D. Describe and discuss the principles that govern professional behavior.

V. The Psychology of Injury to an Athlete

A. Discuss the psychological effects of injury on the athlete.

B. Discuss psychological theories as they apply to an athlete’s responses to injury.

VI. Healing, Therapeutic Modalities and Therapeutic Exercise

A. Describe the healing processes in various tissues.

B. Discuss and apply the basic theories and applications of therapeutic modalities.

C. Discuss and apply the basic theories and applications of therapeutic exercise.

VII. Athletic Injury Documentation, and Policies and Procedures

A. Describe and apply the form and logic of record keeping.

B. Discuss various sports medicine policies and procedures.

C. Discuss and implement emergency preparedness.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-75%    2-4 Examinations
25-50%    1-4 Projects/Assignments

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 207

  • Title: Athletic Training Practicum II*
  • Number: HPER 207
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 320
  • Lecture Hours: 16
  • Other Hours: 304

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 195 and HPER 198 and BIOL 140 and BIOL 225.
Corequisites: HPER 204.

Description:

At the conclusion of this practicum, the student will be able to explain and demonstrate the basic theories supporting the uses of therapeutic modalities and therapeutic exercise, and the evaluation/assessment of injuries to athletes. The student will demonstrate a functional understanding of the major muscle groups of the human body. The student will be able to discuss and explain the duties and responsibilities of a certified athletic trainer (ATC). Direct work with specific athletic teams will facilitate the practicum. This practicum will be hands-on, and conducted under the direct supervision of a certified/licensed athletic trainer. This class is intended for athletic training and other allied health students. 16 hrs. lecture and 304 hrs. practicum.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explain and discuss the detailed anatomy of each major joint of the human body.

  2. Describe and palpate the proximal and distal insertions and muscle belly of each primary mover muscle.

  3. Explain and apply the concept of “mechanism” of athletic injury.

  4. Describe and demonstrate the basic steps in athletic injury evaluation, on and off the field or court.

  5. Describe and demonstrate the basic logic and decision-making processes in athletic injury treatment and management.

  6. Describe the basic concepts of how therapeutic modalities facilitate the physical restoration of normal functioning to injured body parts.

  7. Describe and utilize the therapeutic exercise equipment of the training room in a purposeful way, including the basic progression theories of therapeutic exercise.

  8. Implement basic proprioceptive rehabilitation.

  9. Describe and demonstrate advanced muscle stretching techniques.

  10. Develop a basic injury rehabilitation program for several non-surgical athletic injuries.

  11. Complete a full season as a “team” athletic trainer, and be able to describe the responsibilities in detail.

  12. Complete a tour of two non-JCCC college athletic training facilities and make oral and written reports on your experiences.

  13. Explain orally and in writing the core responsibilities of an athletic trainer in the three different practice settings.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Human Orthopedic Anatomy

A. Identify, palpate and discuss ligaments of various joints.

B. Identify, palpate and discuss capsular structures of various joints.

C. Identify, palpate and discuss articular cartilages of various joints.

D. Identify, palpate and discuss boney landmarks of various joints.

E. Discuss functional anatomy.

II. Assessment

A. Describe and demonstrate proper history gathering.

B. Identify and explain common mechanisms of injury.

C. Explain demonstrate assessment of the injured athlete’s level of disability.

III. Therapeutic Modalities and Therapeutic Exercise

A. Describe, discuss and apply warm treatments.

B. Describe, discuss and apply cold treatments.

C. Describe, discuss and apply electrical neuromuscular stimulation.

D. Describe, discuss and apply therapeutic exercise modalities and methods.

IV. Investigate and Report Career Insights and Exploration

A. Complete a “team athletic trainer” assignment and compile a daily journal/log.

B. Complete tours of two 4-year college athletic training rooms and interview a staff athletic trainer from each.

C. Research thoroughly three athletic training practice settings and write detailed reports on each.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-50%    2-4 Examinations
50-75%    1-3 Projects/Assignments

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 208

  • Title: Introduction to Exercise Physiology
  • Number: HPER 208
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This introduction to exercise physiology will introduce the effects of exercise on the muscular system, the cardiovascular system and the metabolic system. The course will prepare the student in the design of and principles for an individual exercise program. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Recognize the vital part science plays in the successful conduct of physical education and athletic performance.
  2. Describe the basic components of the skeletal muscle system.
  3. Analyze muscular contraction in relationship to human movement.
  4. Ascertain the effects of exercise on muscular principles.
  5. Analyze neuromuscular aspects of movement.
  6. Describe respiration.
  7. Characterize the exercise response in respiration.
  8. Contrast training adaptations of respiration to the non-trained individual.
  9. Describe the cardiovascular system.
  10. Critique cardiovascular responses to exercise.
  11. Evaluate cardiorespiratory training principles and adaptations to the cardiorespiratory system.
  12. Explain thermoregulation.
  13. Describe energy production of the human body.
  14. Explain anaerobic metabolism during exercise.
  15. Explain aerobic metabolism during exercise.
  16. Ascertain the effects of exercise on metabolic training principles.
  17. Evaluate nutrition for exercise and fitness.
  18. Measure body composition and modify weight control.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Exercise Physiology

A. Describe exercise physiology and why we study the subject.

B. Differentiate between exercise responses and training adaptations.

C. Compare levels of training adaptation.

D. List and explain training principles.

E. Define and explain periodization.

F. Identify symptoms of overtraining.

II. The Skeletal System

A. Differentiate between cortical and trabecular bone.

B. Define bone remodeling.

C. Describe the hormonal control of bone remodeling and growth.

D. Identify age-related changes in bone density.

E. Identify sex-related differences in bone density.

F. Discuss the factors involved in the attainment of peak bone density.

G. Apply training principles to the development of an exercise program that would enhance bone growth.

H. Describe the skeletal adaptations that occur as a result of an exercise training program.

I. Identify the risk to bone health associated with athletic amenorrhea.

III. Skeletal Muscle

A. Describe the functions of skeletal muscle tissue.

B. Identify the characteristics of muscle tissue that make movement possible.

C. Discuss the sliding-filament theory of muscle contraction.

D. Explain the changes that occur in the sarcomere during contraction.

E. Identify and discuss the function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, T-Tubules and myofibrils.

F. Describe the sequence of events involved in the stimulation of muscle contraction.

G. Differentiate muscle fiber types on the basis of contractile and metabolic properties.

H. Compare and discuss the relationships between “fiber type” and athletic participation..

IV. Muscular Contraction and Human Movement

A. Differentiate between force and load.

B. Compare and contrast concentric and eccentric dynamic contractions.

C. Describe neural and mechanical factors that affect force development.

D. Identify possible causes of muscle fatigue.

E. Discuss the two models of delayed-onset muscle soreness.

F. Identify the different laboratory methods for assessing muscular function.

G. Describe the basic pattern of strength development.

H. Describe the factors that affect age-related loss of muscular strength.

V. Muscular Training Principles

A. Develop a resistance training program to include each training principle.

B. Describe the muscular adaptations to dynamic resistance training.

C. Describe the muscular adaptations to dynamic aerobic endurance training programs.

D. Discuss the relationship between muscle function and lower-back pain.

E. List the effects of anabolic steroid use.

F. Compare the position of the class and the American College of Sports Medicine in the use of anabolic steroids and other chemically enhanced body supplements..

VI. Neuromuscular Aspects of Movement

A. Describe the nerve supply to muscle.

B. Describe the sequence of events at the neuromuscular junction.

C. Describe the structure of the muscle spindle.

D. Describe the structure of Golgi tendon organ.

E. Explain how the muscle spindle and Golgi tendon function with the myotatic reflex.

F. Differentiate between dynamic and static flexibility.

G. Describe how to assess flexibility.

H. Discuss the relationship between flexibility and low-back pain.

I. Compare different types of flexibility training.

J. Develop a flexibility program.

VII. Respiration

A. Explain pulmonary ventilation, external respiration, and internal respiration.

B. Explain the mechanics of breathing.

C. Differentiate between pulmonary and bronchial circulation.

D. Describe static and dynamic lung volumes.

E. Explain how respiration is regulated at rest and during exercise.

F. Explain how oxygen and carbon dioxide are transported in the circulatory system.

G. Explain how oxygen is released to the tissues.

VIII. Respiratory Exercise Response and Training Adaptations

A. Graph and explain the response of respiratory changes during moderate aerobic exercise.

B. Graph and explain the response of respiratory changes during heavy aerobic exercise.

C. Graph and explain the response of respiratory changes during incremental to maximum exercise.

D. Graph and explain the response of respiratory changes during static exercise.

E. List the adaptations that occur in the respiratory system as a result of exercise training.

F. Discuss the variations of respiratory dynamics with varying age groups.

G. Discuss the variations of respiratory dynamics between males and females.

H. Research the value in altitude training.

I. Research the affects of training in polluted conditions.

IX. Cardiovascular System

A. Explain the functions of the cardiovascular system.

B. Identify the components of the cardiovascular system.

C. Explain how electrical excitation is spread through the conduction system of the heart.

D. Explain how the cardiovascular system is regulated.

E. Discuss measurements for oxygen consumption, cardiac output, SV, HR and blood pressure.

X. Cardiovascular Responses to Exercise

A. Graph and explain the cardiovascular responses during moderate aerobic exercise.

B. Graph and explain the cardiovascular responses during heavy aerobic exercise.

C. Graph and explain the cardiovascular responses during incremental to maximum exercise.

D. Graph and explain the cardiovascular responses during resistance exercise.

E. Graph and explain the cardiovascular responses during static exercise.

F. Discuss the similarities and differences between the sexes in cardiovascular response to exercise.

G. Discuss the similarities and differences between age groups in cardiovascular response to exercise.

XI. Cardiorespiratory Training Principles and Adaptations

A. Discuss the development of a cardiorespiratory training program.

B. Differentiate among the methods used to classify exercise intensity.

C. Calculate training intensity ranges using maximal heart rate.

D. Discuss the merits of specificity training in relationship to cardiovascular adaptations.

XII. Thermoregulation

A. Identify environmental factors that affect human thermoregulation.

B. Describe thermal balance.

C. Discuss factors that contribute to heat gain and heat loss.

D. List the mechanisms by which heat is lost from the body.

XIII. Energy Production

A. Describe the role of ATP.

B. Summarize cellular respiration in the production of ATP from carbohydrate fuels.

C. Summarize cellular respiration in the production of ATP from fat fuels.

D. Summarize cellular respiration in the production of ATP from protein fuels.

E. Calculate the production of ATP from glucose and/or glycogen.

F. Calculate the production of ATP from fatty acids.

G. Calculate the production of ATP from amino acids.

H. Compare the use of carbohydrate, fat and protein substrates during exercise.

I. Compare the differences of exercise intensity and the use carbohydrate, fat and protein substrates.

XIV. Anaerobic Metabolism During Exercise

A. Describe the energy continuum of maximal exercise.

B. Discuss sports that use the anaerobic metabolism pathways.

C. Explain the physiological reasons why lactate may accumulate in the blood.

D. Distinguish between the ATP-PC, lactic, and oxygen systems.

E. Explain oxygen deficit.

F. Explain the fate of lactate during exercise and recovery.

XV. Aerobic Metabolism During Exercise

A. Explain the aerobic response to exercise.

B. Compare oxygen consumption during short term, light aerobic exercise.

C. Compare oxygen consumption during moderate intensity exercise.

D. Compare oxygen consumption during prolonged heavy exercise.

E. Compare oxygen consumption during incremental maximum exercise.

F. Describe how the oxygen cost of breathing changes during exercise.

G. Calculate the metabolic cost of activity in varying exercises.

H. List the ways in which an exercising individual can increase his/her efficiency.

I. Explain why efficiency and economy are important to exercise performance.

XVI. Metabolic Training Principles and Adaptations

A. Name the metabolic training principles.

B. Describe the metabolic adaptations that occur due to a well-designed training program.

XVII. Nutrition for Fitness and Athletics

A. List the differences between nutrition goals for training and competition.

B. Discuss a balanced diet for sedentary individuals.

C. Discuss a balanced diet for active individuals.

D. Discuss the positive and negative aspects of a high carbohydrate diet.

E. Discuss situations in which a higher RDA of protein may or may not be advisable.

F. Explain carbohydrate loading.

G. Research the value of commercially available sport drinks.

H. Identify and discuss eating disorders.

XVIII. Body Composition and Weight Control

A. Describe body composition.

B. Calculate percent body fat.

C. Contrast the percent body fat between average adult males and females.

D. Differentiate between overweight and obesity.

E. List and discuss the health risks of being overweight or obese.

F. Compare the effects of diet alone, exercise alone, and exercise and diet combined to percent body fat.

G. Apply the training principles to percent body fat control.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

50-70%    Tests and Final Exam
20-50%    Projects
15-25%    Quizzes/Lab Assignment/Homework

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 220

  • Title: Sports Officiating
  • Number: HPER 220
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The rules and practical application of officiating will be covered for the following sports: volleyball, football, basketball, baseball and softball. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. List and describe the rules of volleyball, football, basketball and baseball/softball.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the rules through officiating in class activities, intramurals and observation of certified officials in game situations.
  3. Demonstrate proper officiating mechanics.
  4. Apply knowledge to become a more informed and intelligent spectator when watching sporting events.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Duties of an Official

A. List the general duties of the official.

B. Explain how the official can establish a subtle influence in game situations.

C. List the preliminary preparations for the official.

II. Volleyball

A. Explain the rules specific to volleyball

B. List and explain the official's uniform and equipment

C. List the responsibilities of the referee.

D. List the responsibilities of the umpire

E. List the responsibilities of the line judges.

F. List the responsibilities of the scorer and timer.

G. List and explain the basic penalties

H. Discuss problem calls that can occur during a game situation.

I. Demonstrate proper officiating mechanics specific to volleyball

III. Football

A. Explain the rules specific to football

B. List and explain the official's uniform and equipment.

C. List the responsibilities of the referee.

D. List the responsibilities of the linesman.

E. List the responsibilities of the umpire.

F. List the responsibilities of the line judge.

G. List and explain the basic penalties

H. Discuss problem calls that can occur during a game situation.

I. Demonstrate proper officiating mechanics specific to football

VI. Basketball

A. Explain the rules specific to basketball.

B. List and explain the official's uniform and equipment.

C. Explain the responsibilities of the floor officials.

D. Explain the responsibilities of the table officials.

E. List and explain the basic penalties.

F. Discuss problem calls that can occur during a game situation.

G. Demonstrate proper officiating mechanics specific to basketball

VII. Baseball/Softball

A. Explain the rules specific to baseball/softball

B. List and explain the official's uniform and equipment.

C. List and explain the basic penalties.

D. Discuss problem calls that can occur during a game situation.

E. List the “four cornerstone” rulings.

F. Demonstrate proper officiating mechanics specific to baseball/softball.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

50-70%    Tests and Final Exam
20-50%    Projects
15-25%    Quizzes/Lab Assignment/Homework

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 224

  • Title: Outdoor Recreation
  • Number: HPER 224
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course introduces the student to activities that create interaction between the individual and elements of the outdoor recreational setting. Outdoor Recreation students study the fundamental basics of governmental, private and public control of recreational lands. Outdoor recreation projects include a variety of outdoor activities, such as camping, hiking, nature observation, biking, rock climbing, canoeing, skiing, map and compass, outdoor safety, and how to dress and pack for outdoor adventures. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Define outdoor recreation.
  2. Analyze the fundamentals of outdoor recreation.
  3. Review outdoor recreational activities.
  4. Review basic outdoor recreation first aid.
  5. Characterize the pioneers of outdoor recreation.
  6. Estimate the economic impact of outdoor pursuits.
  7. Identify the federal resources available for outdoor pursuits.
  8. Identify the state resources available for outdoor pursuits.
  9. Identify the local resources available for outdoor pursuits.
  10. Investigate new resources that may be utilized for outdoor pursuits.
  11. Investigate outdoor recreation resources in other countries.
  12. Organize management policies in outdoor recreation.
  13. Organize management procedures in outdoor recreation.
  14. Define outdoor education.
  15. Summarize the elements of the natural environment.
  16. Evaluate methods of caring for our natural environment.
  17. Identify a variety of animal wildlife.
  18. Identify a variety of plant life.
  19. Organize and demonstrate a personal outdoor recreation activity.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Foundations of Outdoor Recreation

A. Describe humans at play.

B. Compare leisure to recreation.

C. Examine the emergence of outdoor recreation.

II. Outdoor Recreational Activities

A. Review current outdoor recreation activities

B. Research the web and media for current trends in outdoor recreation activities.

III. Basic Outdoor Recreation First Aid

A. Review basic outdoor recreation first aid.

IV. Pioneers of Outdoor Recreation

A. Outline fundamentals of the “Transcendentalists” in outdoor recreation.

B. Outline fundamentals of the “Naturalists” in outdoor recreation.

C. Outline fundamentals of the “Practitioners” in outdoor recreation.

V. Economics of Outdoor Recreation

A. Explain the nature of economics in outdoor pursuits.

B. Evaluate the national economic impact of outdoor recreation.

C. Evaluate the economics of tourism.

D. Evaluate the regional and local economic impact of outdoor recreation.

E. Recognize the economic potential for commercial and private outdoor recreation.

F. Outline the possible careers in outdoor recreation.

VI. Federal Resources and Recreation

A. Analyze the National Forest System.

B. Analyze the National Park System.

C. Appraise the wilderness lands of the 50 states.

D. Explore the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service.

E. Summarize federal agencies governing outdoor recreation.

VII. State Resources and Recreation

A. Analyze the State Parks.

B. Analyze the State Forest.

C. Appraise Nature Preserves.

D. Appraise Fish and Wildlife Areas.

VIII. Local Resources and Recreation

A. Explain the local governmental structure of outdoor recreation.

B. Evaluate the local financing of outdoor recreation.

IX. Non-Traditional Outdoor Recreation Resources

A. List and describe personal outdoor recreation resources.

B. List and describe private outdoor recreation resources.

C. List and describe semipublic outdoor recreation resources.

D. List and describe industrial and business resources for outdoor recreation.

X. Outdoor Recreation Around the World

A. Research and use websites to identify outdoor recreation resources in Canada.

B. Research and use websites to identify outdoor recreation resources in Great Britain.

C. Research and use websites  to identify outdoor recreation resources in France.

D. Research and use websites to identify outdoor recreation resources in Australia.

E. Research and use websites to identify outdoor recreation resources in the CIS (Russia and former Soviet republics).

F. Research and use websites  to identify outdoor recreation resources in Africa.

XI. Management Policies in Outdoor Recreation

A. Document the preservation policies for general use outdoor recreation.

B. Document the multiple-use policies for outdoor recreation.

C. Classify policies for outdoor recreation resources.

D. Discuss current national outdoor recreation trends in regards to future planning.

E. Discuss current state and local outdoor recreation trends in regards to future planning.

XII. Practical Procedures in Outdoor Recreation Management

A. Calculate carrying capacity for outdoor recreation resources.

B. Calculate use rates for outdoor recreation resources.

C. List financing needs for outdoor recreation resources.

D. Describe the fee structure for outdoor recreation needs.

E. Summarize visitor management.

F. Review current law that would apply to outdoor recreation.

XIII. Education and the Outdoors

A. Define terminology for outdoor education.

B. Trace the history of outdoor education.

XIV. The Environment as it Relates to Recreation.

A. Describe the nature of ecosystems.

B. Describe the aquatic ecosystems.

C. Describe the estuarine ecosystem.

D. Describe the marine ecosystem.

E. Describe the grassland ecosystem.

F. Describe the desert ecosystem.

XV. Caring for our Natural Environment

A. Examine the effects of air pollution on our outdoor resources

B. Examine the effects of water pollution on our outdoor resources.

C. Discover solutions and programs to cultivate and protect our natural resources.

XVI. Animal Wildlife and Plant Life

A. Identify between 50 - 100 common animals in the various ecosystems.

B. Identify between 50 - 100 common forms of plant life in the various ecosystems.

XVII. The Personal Outdoor Adventure

A. Demonstrate the successful setup and takedown of a low-impact camping environment.

B. Organize and implement a personal outdoor recreation experience.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

50-70%    Tests and Final Exam
20-50%    Projects
15-25%    Quizzes/Lab Assignment/Homework

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

The students will join teams for various outdoor projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 240

  • Title: Lifetime Fitness I
  • Number: HPER 240
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 1

Description:

Lifetime Fitness introduces the student to basic fitness principles, physical activity and the relationship to a healthy lifestyle. This class is designed to provide a variety of physical activity experiences. Students will gain an understanding of the necessary skills needed to develop and implement personal lifestyle improvements related to cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body composition. Physical activity tracking will be utilized in this course.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Understand the benefits of increased physical activity.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the various components of fitness.
  3. Utilize current strategies for maintaining an active lifestyle.
  4. Evaluate individual risks and safety factors that may affect participation in physical activity and fitness throughout a lifetime.
  5. Measure personal status performance in one or more of the components of fitness.
  6. Apply principles of exercise training for improving components of fitness.
  7. Utilize a personal physical activity log to record workouts.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Physical Activity and Components of Fitness

A. Understand the benefits of exercise.

B. Understand cardiovascular fitness.

1. Participate in appropriate cardiovascular exercises.

2. Safely and effectively challenge the respiratory system in order to increase efficiency of the heart and lungs.

C. Understand muscular strength and muscular endurance.

1.Participate in appropriate resistance exercises.

2.Use proper technique to improve muscular strength and endurance.

D. Understand flexibility.

1. Participate in appropriate flexibility exercises.

2. Understand the various stretching techniques in order to improve joint range of motion.

E. Understand body composition.

F. Practice suitable exercise frequency.

G. Apply personal strategies for modifying individual exercises and/or overall intensity to appropriate levels.

II. Physical Activity Assessment

A. Assess cardiovascular fitness.

1. Demonstrate the ability to assess heart rate at rest.

2. Assess heart rate during activity.

3. Demonstrate the ability to calculate target heart rate zone.

B. Assess muscular strength and/or endurance.

C. Assess joint range of motion and flexibility.

D. Assess body composition.

E. Examine various methods of evaluating current fitness level and set appropriate goals.

III. Safety and Risk

A. Apply principles necessary for safe and successful performance of physical activity.

B. Practice appropriate fitness facility usage.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-30%    Test/Assessment
70-90%    Attendance/Participation/Physical Activity

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous and/or potentially dangerous exercise.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 241

  • Title: Lifetime Fitness II*
  • Number: HPER 241
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 240.

Description:

This course is a continuation and expansion of Lifetime Fitness I. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, student should be able to:

  1. Explore, discuss and attain positive attitudes toward a continuing exercise program.
  2. Examine the possibilities of increasing the duration and/or frequency of an exercise program in an effort to benefit the following: a) improved psychological functioning; b) increased efficiency of the heart and lungs; c) increased muscle strength and endurance; d) evaluate the individual’s ability to reduce to stress through exercise; e) evaluate and record body weight, while emphasizing proper muscle tone and a lowered percent body fat; f) improved appearance.
  3. Perform prescribed fitness circuit exercise, at the level appropriate to the individual’s ability level.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Physical Fitness Assessment:

A. The student will read and sign consent/release form.

B. The student will complete the physical assessment test.

C. The student will review and discuss the fitness center policies and procedures.

D. The student will review and explain the proper use of equipment.

II. Exercise Program

A. The student will review and discuss the need for appropriate workout apparel.

B. The student will demonstrate the proper check-in procedures.

C. Demonstrate the proper warm-up routines for the following: ride bike, jump rope, jog or walk on treadmill.

D. Demonstrate the proper stretching techniques.

E. Demonstrate item II.C until a time that the student has reached his/her exercise heart-rate zone.

F. Demonstrate the use of the fitness circuit for a period of more than 20 minutes, while maintaining his/her exercise heart-rate zone.

G. Review and demonstrate the proper cool-down procedures.

H. Review and demonstrate the proper check-out procedures.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60% In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30% Written Exams
20-30% Skill Development Tests
0-10% Projects

Total 100%

In-class physical demonstration of the course competencies is evaluated for each lifetime fitness course (I, II, III, and IV) use time and appropriate exercise heart-rate zone factors.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous and/or potentially dangerous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 242

  • Title: Lifetime Fitness III*
  • Number: HPER 242
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 241.

Description:

This course is a continuation and expansion of Lifetime Fitness II. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explore, discuss and attain positive attitudes toward a continuing exercise program.
  2. Examine the possibilities of increasing the duration and/or frequency of an exercise program in an effort to benefit the following: a) improved psychological functioning; b) increased efficiency of the heart and lungs; c) increased muscle strength and endurance; d) evaluate the individual’s ability to reduce to stress through exercise; e) evaluate and record body weight, while emphasizing proper muscle tone and a lowered percent body fat; f) improved appearance
  3. Perform prescribed fitness circuit exercise, at the level appropriate to the individual’s ability level.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Physical Fitness Assessment

A. The student will read and sign consent/release form.

B. The student will complete the physical assessment test.

C. The student will review and discuss the fitness center policies and procedures.

D. The student will review and explain the proper use of equipment.

II. Exercise Program

A. The student will review and discuss the need for appropriate workout apparel.

B. The student will demonstrate the proper check-in procedures.

C. Demonstrate the proper warm-up routines for the following: ride bike, jump rope, jog or walk on treadmill.

D. Demonstrate the proper stretching techniques.

E. Demonstrate item II.C until a time that the student has reached his/her exercise heart-rate zone.

F. Demonstrate the use of the fitness circuit for a period of more than 20 minutes, while maintaining his/her exercise heart-rate zone.

G. Review and demonstrate the proper cool-down procedures.

H. Review and demonstrate the proper check-out procedures.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60% In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30% Written Exams
20-30% Skill Development Tests
0-10% Projects

Total 100%

In-class physical demonstration of the course competencies is evaluated for each lifetime fitness course (I, II, III, and IV) use time and appropriate exercise heart-rate zone factors.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous and/or potentially dangerous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 243

  • Title: Lifetime Fitness IV*
  • Number: HPER 243
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 242.

Description:

This course is a continuation and expansion of Lifetime Fitness III. 2 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explore, discuss and attain positive attitudes toward a continuing exercise program.
  2. Examine the possibilities of increasing the duration and/or frequency of an exercise program in an effort to benefit the following: a) improved psychological functioning; b) increased efficiency of the heart and lungs; c) increased muscle strength and endurance; d) evaluate the individual’s ability to reduce to stress through exercise; e) evaluate and record body weight, while emphasizing proper muscle tone and a lowered percent body fat; f) improved appearance.
  3. Perform prescribed fitness circuit exercise, at the level appropriate to the individual’s ability level.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Physical Fitness Assessment:

A. The student will read and sign consent/release form.

B. The student will complete the physical assessment test.

C. The student will review and discuss the fitness center policies and procedures.

D. The student will review and explain the proper use of equipment.

II. Exercise Program:

A. The student will review and discuss the need for appropriate workout apparel.

B. The student will demonstrate the proper check-in procedures.

C. Demonstrate the proper warm-up routines for the following: ride bike, jump rope, jog or walk on treadmill.

D. Demonstrate the proper stretching techniques.

E. Demonstrate item II.C until a time that the student has reached his/her exercise heart-rate zone.

F. Demonstrate the use of the fitness circuit for a period of more than 20 minutes, while maintaining his/her exercise heart-rate zone.

G. Review and demonstrate the proper cool-down procedures.

H. Review and demonstrate the proper check-out procedures.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60% In-class physical demonstration of competencies
20-30% Written Exams
20-30% Skill Development Tests
0-10% Projects

Total 100%

In-class physical demonstration of the course competencies is evaluated for each lifetime fitness course (I, II, III, and IV) use time and appropriate exercise heart-rate zone factors.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Strenuous and/or potentially dangerous exercise

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 245

  • Title: Elementary Physical Education
  • Number: HPER 245
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to teach in the area of elementary physical education and/or elementary education. This course will provide the students with knowledge and background in planning, classroom management techniques, teaching methodology, legal liability, evaluation, wellness, special students, sports, activities and games related to elementary physical education. The course will include observation and teaching. 3 hrs.lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the evolution of elementary school physical education.
  2. Identify the need for physical activity.
  3. Describe the factors involved in the instructional process of elementary physical education.
  4. List the guidelines and describe the needs for fitness and wellness in children.
  5. Identify the basic mechanics of the various fundamental motor skills.
  6. Explain and demonstrate the specialized motor skills.
  7. List and describe the specific skills and instructional procedures for the various sport activities.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction of Physical Education in the Elementary School Curriculum

A. Describe an educationally sound rationale for physical education.

B. Identify outside influences and historical events affecting physical education.

C. Identify current trends in physical education.

D. Define federal mandates that have affected physical education.

E. Identify the need for physical activity for children.

F. Define growth patterns for the developing youngster.

G. Provide an overview of somatotyping various children’s body types.

H. Differentiate the relationship between activity and skeletal growth and muscular development.

I. Differentiate the relationship between maturity levels and development of motor skills.

J. Identify aerobic capacity and capabilities of the developing child.

K. Define the effect of obesity on performing motor skills.

L. Identify guidelines for exercising children safely.

II. The Instructional Process

A. Identify guidelines for measurable student objectives.

B. Develop practice and teaching keys for learning motor skills more effectively.

C. Define the various teaching styles.

D. Outline the four activity phases and procedures for developing physical education lesson plans.

E. Identify the components of instructional effectiveness in the elementary physical education classroom.

F. Differentiate the proper techniques for providing feedback.

G. Identify guidelines for effective class management.

H. Describe the various evaluation methods for elementary physical education children.

I. Identify the criteria for mainstreaming disabled children into the regular physical education program.

J. Differentiate and describe modifications for specific types of disabilities.

III. Program Implementation

A. Identify guidelines for construction of physical education curriculum.

B. Define curricula concerns for the various levels of physical education.

1. Level 1 (K - 2)

2. Level 2 (3 - 4)

3. Level 3 (3 - 6)

C. Differentiate legal liability, supervision and safety requirements.

D. Develop guidelines for facilities and equipment.

IV. Fitness and Wellness

A. Identify and differentiate the health-related and skill-related components of fitness.

B. Identify the various fitness testing procedures.

C. List and describe fitness training guidelines.

D. Identify basic body systems and mechanical principles which affect motor skill performance.

E. Describe nutritional categories and the food guide pyramid.

F. Define the origin and effects of obesity on children.

G. Identify the effects and concerns of various drugs on children.

H. Define strategies for teaching wellness and lifestyle decisions.

V. Fundamental Motor Skills and Specialized Motor Skills

A. List and describe the classifications of movement themes.

B. List and describe the components of locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative skills.

C. List and describe body management skills.

D. Identify the use of various apparatus in the physical education classroom.

E. Explain and demonstrate manipulative, rhythmic movement, gymnastic, personal challenge and game skills.

VI. Sports Skills

A. Describe the instructional procedures for the following sports:

1. basketball

2. football

3. hockey

4. soccer

5. softball

6. track and field and cross country

7. volleyball

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

50-70%    Tests and Final Exam
20-50%    Projects
15-25%    Quizzes/Lab Assignment/Homework

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 255

  • Title: Introduction to Physical Education
  • Number: HPER 255
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will introduce the student to the field of physical education and sport. This course will discuss the historical, biomechanical, physiological and psychological foundations of physical education and sport. It will examine the role of physical activity as a means to help individuals acquire the skills, fitness levels and knowledge that contribute to the arena of physical development and organized competition. It will also discuss the role physical education and sports play in our society. Each individual will develop a personal philosophy for physical education and sports. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Articulate the meaning and philosophy of physical education and sport.
  2. Discuss the role of physical education and sport in our society.
  3. Justify the importance of movement as the keystone of physical education and sport.
  4. Organize the historical foundations of physical education and sport.
  5. Interpret the biomechanical foundations of physical education and sport.
  6. Explain the importance of exercise physiology in physical education and sport.
  7. Explain the importance of fitness in physical education and sport.
  8. Review the sociological foundations of physical education and sport.
  9. Review the psychological foundations of physical education and sport.
  10. Appraise teaching and coaching careers in physical education and sport.
  11. Appraise fitness and health related careers in physical education and sport.
  12. Appraise sport management careers in physical education and sport.
  13. Appraise media careers in physical education and sport.
  14. Summarize professional development in physical education and sport.
  15. Discuss the future of physical education and sport.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Philosophy of Physical Education and Sport

A. Discuss the nature of contemporary physical education and sport.

B. Define the following: sport history, sport sociology, sport psychology, motor development, motor learning, biomechanics, exercise physiology, sports medicine, sport pedagogy, adapted physical activity and sport management.

C. Describe the goals of education in our society.

D. Identify the characteristics of a physically educated person.

E. Articulate the contributions of physical education and sport to the field of general education.

F. Discuss the importance of assessment in physical education and sport.

G. Develop a personal philosophy of physical education and sport.

II. The Role of Physical Education and Sport in our Society

A. Interpret to one's peers the role physical education and sport play in health and wellness.

B. Discuss the fitness movement.

C. Compare the current educational reform movement to physical education programs.

III. The Movement Revolution and Physical Education

A. Explain why movement is the keystone of physical education and sport.

B. Define locomotor skills.

C. Show the relationship between movement concepts, fundamental movement skills, sport skills, dance and fitness activities.

D. Analyze techniques to demonstrate in teaching fundamental movement skills.

IV. Historical Foundations of Physical Education and Sport

A. Trace the history of physical education and sport.

B. Explain the contributions of the Athenian Greeks to physical education and sport.

C. Identify historical philosophies that were deterrents to physical education and sport.

D. Identify historical events that served as catalysts for physical education and sport.

E. Identify leaders and the contributions of each to the field of physical education and sport.

V. Biomechanical Foundations of Physical Education and Sport

A. Define the term biomechanics and indicate its relationship to kinesiology.

B. Identify the value of biomechanics for the physical education an sport profession.

C. Define and illustrate an example of the following: stability, motion, leverage, force.

D. Describe several techniques used to analyze motion.

VI. Exercise Physiology

A. Define exercise physiology.

B. Explain the importance of exercise physiology in organizing training parameters.

C. Discuss training programs that utilize exercise physiology.

VII. Fitness

A. Identify concepts of health and motor-performance fitness.

B. Explain the principles and guidelines for designing fitness programs.

C. Identify and discuss contributors and deterrents to fitness.

VIII. Sociological Foundations of Physical Education and Sport

A. Distinguish how sport is a socializing force in the American culture.

B. Discuss the state of “physical education” in our society today.

C. Discuss the state of “sport” in our society today.

D. Formulate a philosophy of physical education.

E. Formulate a philosophy of sport.

IX. Psychological Foundations of Physical Education and sport

A. Identify and give examples of the following: cognitive learning, affective learning and psychomotor learning.

B. Discuss motor learning in relationship to the following: readiness, motor development, motivation, reinforcement and individual differences.

C. Define and discuss sport psychology.

D. Describe the psychological benefits of participation in sport and physical activities.

E. Discuss the roles of anxiety, arousal and attention in performing motor skills.

X. Teaching and Coaching Careers in Physical Education and Sport

A. Describe the qualities of an effective teacher.

B. Describe the similarities and differences between teaching and coaching.

C. Discuss strategies to maximize opportunities for employment in a teaching or coaching position.

XI. Fitness and Health-Related Careers in Physical Education and Sport

A. Research the responsibilities of a fitness and/or exercise specialist.

B. Research websites for the various employment opportunities for a fitness or an exercise specialist.

C. Distinguish the differences between the fitness/exercise specialist and an athletic trainer.

D. Discuss the responsibilities of an athletic trainer.

XII. Sport Management Careers

A. Identify opportunities for professionals in sport management.

B. Research websites for entry-level positions in sport management.

XIII. Sport Media Careers

A. Describe career opportunities in sports media.

B. Explain how preparation in physical education and sport can assist individuals seeking media career opportunities.

XIV. Professional Develop in Physical Education and Sport

A. Self-assess strengths, interests, goals and career preferences.

B. Discuss the role of practical experience in increasing professional opportunities.

C. Identify leadership skills for physical education and sport professionals.

D. List professional organizations in physical education and sport.

XV. Issues and Challenges of Physical Education

A. Discuss the role of physical educators in promoting the development of fitness values.

B. Discuss the role of sport professionals in promoting fitness and sportsmanship.

C. Interpret the role of physical educators and sport professionals from the perspective of today’s youth.

D. Distinguish the role fitness plays in reducing the health care crisis in America.

E. Describe specific strategies that promote lifespan involvement in physical activity and sport.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

50-70%    Tests and Final Exam
20-50%    Projects
15-25%    Quizzes/Lab Assignment/Homework

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HPER 291

No information found.