Theater (THEA)

Courses

THEA 120   Introduction to Theater (3 Hours)  

Students will be introduced to a variety of theatrical experiences, which includes reading plays and analyzing live theatre performances. This course also offers opportunities to experience theatre through set construction, design, stage and costume crew, or acting if the student desires. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

THEA 120H   HON: Introduction to Theater* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

THEA 121   Fundamentals of Acting (3 Hours)

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of acting for those students who have little or no experience in the theatre. We will overview all the tools used by actors, including improvisation, vocal, physical and psychological warm-ups, building trust, relaxation and discipline techniques. Students will complete a minimum of three in-class performances. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

THEA 121H   HON: Fundamentals of Acting* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

THEA 123   Improvisation for the Theater* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: THEA 130.

The student will be introduced to theater improvisation, which will emphasize creative stage activities not requiring a written script. Participation in activities of this course will release and enhance the work of serious acting students and show the students how to approach characterization viscerally rather than intellectually, spontaneously rather than intentionally. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

THEA 130   Acting I* (3 Hours)  

Prerequisites: THEA 121 (with a grade of "C" or higher) or department approval.

Acting I will expand on the skills learned in Fundamentals of Acting and will concentrate on developing scene work. Emphasis will be on expanding creative potential through exercises in self-awareness, posture, movement, voice and personality projection. Students will complete a minimum of four in-class performances. 3 hrs./wk. plus rehearsals and performances.

THEA 130H   HON: Acting I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

THEA 131   Voice and Speech (3 Hours)

The student will develop techniques to expand breath support, vocal range and dynamics; learn precise articulation; and strengthen the connection between thought and sound. Through the use of exercises to free, develop and strengthen the voice, the student will be better able to communicate the full range of human emotion and all the nuances of thought. Skills acquired in this course are essential for actors, broadcast journalists, educators and other public speakers. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the fall semester.

THEA 133   Technical Practicum I (1 Hour)  

Students gain practical experience in technical theater in this course. The student completes the course objectives by working in the theatre department's productions and/or working in the scene/costume shop during the semester. 2 hrs. lab/wk.

THEA 134   Performance Practicum I (1 Hour)

This course will enable students to gain practical experience in performance-related aspects of college theater productions. Admission may be granted upon being cast in a JCCC production. 2 hrs. lab/wk.

THEA 135   Stage Makeup (2 Hours)

An introductory course designed to provide an understanding of, and practical skill in, the design and application of makeup for theatrical performance. 1 hr. lecture, 1 hr. lab/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

THEA 136   Costume Construction (3 Hours)

This is a survey of the theory, techniques and skills used in costume creation for the theater and film. Areas of study and practice include basic construction, patterning and cutting; fabrics, design and realization; millinery; craftwork; and organization. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

THEA 137   Movement for the Stage (3 Hours)

The student will develop techniques to expand kinesthetic awareness, flexibility, physical freedom and the language of movement. Through the use of exercises to free, develop and strengthen physical vocabulary, the student will be better able to communicate the physical life of a character. Skills acquired in this course will include mime, stage combat, commedia, improvisation and circus techniques. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

THEA 140   Basic Stagecraft (3 Hours)  

This course introduces the general student and theater major to basic stagecraft. Through lectures, in-class demonstrations and hands-on experiences, the student will gain a working and appreciative knowledge of technical theater. The course includes 15 lab hours and attendance at two live theatrical productions. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk. This course is typically offered in the fall semester.

THEA 145   Introduction to Theater Design (3 Hours)

This lecture and studio class introduces the theory and practice of theater design and the graphics and standards of entertainment technology. Emphasis will be on the processes and practices used in designing for the performing arts. Using course-taught computer and hand-based drawing techniques, the student will create a portfolio of his or her work through in-class projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk. This course is typically offered in the spring semester.

THEA 209   Script Analysis (3 Hours)

Script Analysis introduces students to those methods used in the theater for the study and/or analysis of plays. Directors, actors and designers use script analysis during their preparatory work and then continue to use it through the rehearsal process until, and sometimes even after, the production has finished. This course is of value to the student because it focuses on the crucial elements of a play encountered during the production process including dramatic structure, content and meaning. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically offered in the fall semester only.

THEA 225   Reader's Theater (3 Hours)

Students will combine acting, interpretation and rhetoric as they analyze and perform poetry, prose and dramatic literature and present public performances. Through the process of reading, studying, investing, rehearsing and performing literary and nonliterary works, the student will learn to pay particular attention to the voice embodied in a given text and the cultural and social context within which that voice speaks. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. plus rehearsals. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

THEA 230   Acting II* (3 Hours)  

Prerequisites: THEA 130 (with a grade of "C" or higher).

This continuation of Acting I will focus on more in-depth character analysis and development, emphasizing the actor’s responsibility in creating the character. Students will complete a minimum of five in-class performances. 3 hrs./wk. plus rehearsals and performances.

THEA 230H   HON: Acting II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

THEA 232   Play Reading and Production* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: THEA 120.

This course is an introductory survey in the process of reading and producing plays. The focus of the course will be on reading a play and understanding the steps necessary to create a production of that play. Some of the topics explored will include play selection, script analysis, the audition process, the rehearsal process, stage management, directing, and the actor-audience-director relationship. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

THEA 233   Technical Practicum II* (1 Hour)  

Prerequisites: THEA 133.

Students gain practical experience in technical theater in this course. The student completes the course objectives by working on the theatre department's productions and/or working in the scene/costume shop during the semester. 4 hrs.lab/wk.

THEA 235   Technical Practicum III* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

Students will gain professional technical theater experience in this course by working as an apprentice for the theater department and an outside professional performing arts agency. While on campus and/or on location, students will build and install a stage and/or scenery as they work alongside theater professionals to execute theatrical productions. 4 hrs. lab/wk. This course is offered in summer only; permission from instructor is required to enroll.

THEA 250   Introduction to Costume Design (3 Hours)

This course is designed to instruct students on the concepts and realities of costume design. The course will provide hands-on design exercises that will include researching historical time periods, script reading and production analysis, costume rendering techniques, and presenting designs in a production meeting. This course is typically taught in the spring semester. 2 hrs. lecture and 2 hrs. lab/wk.

THEA 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

THEA 292   Special Topics:* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to performance, technical theatre, and design not normally taught in the curriculum, to interested and qualified students within the program. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

THEA 120

  • Title: Introduction to Theater
  • Number: THEA 120
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Students will be introduced to a variety of theatrical experiences, which includes reading plays and analyzing live theatre performances. This course also offers opportunities to experience theatre through set construction, design, stage and costume crew, or acting if the student desires. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Articulate a definition of theater.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationships between the audience and theater artists.
  3. Describe vocational options in the theater.
  4. Trace the historical development of the theater.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to critically read and discuss a play.
  6. Respond critically to a theatrical production, expressing both personal preferences and an appreciation for the aesthetic experience.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  Definition of Theater

A. List essential elements of a theater production.

B. Compare and contrast theater with other performing arts.

II.  Relationships Between the Audience and Theater Artists

A. Examine the individual roles of those involved in creating the performance event.

B. Explore the interactions between theater artists.

C. Explore the "transaction" that occurs between artists and audience members during a performance.

III. Vocational Options in the Theater

A. Compare the "business" of the theater with the artistry of the theater.

B. Examine the working conditions for theater professionals.

IV. Major Historical Developments of the Theater

A. Examine the origins of theater.

B. Determine the significance of the playhouse, performance style and the play script in 5th century BC Greece.

C. Compare the theater of ancient Greece to that of Shakespearean England.

D. Examine how theater has continued to evolve and diversify in the late 19th century and through the 21st century.

E. Contrast Western theater with theater of other cultures.

F. Predict future trends.

V. Categories and Structures of Plays

A. Identify ways of categorizing play scripts.

B. Identify and explain the basic qualities and structures of a play.

C. Read and discuss a minimum of three plays.

VI. The Critical and Aesthetic Experience

A. Attend play productions.

B. Participate in oral critiques of productions.

C. Explore critical approaches to writing about plays.

D. Write production reviews.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-40%    Examinations (minimum of two)
20-30%    Daily or weekly assignments/class participation
15-25%    Specialty Project (such as collaborative projects, an original 10-minute play, production work)
20-30%    Written production reviews

See individual instructor's syllabus for specifics of how these methods of evaluation are weighted.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 120H

No information found.

THEA 121

  • Title: Fundamentals of Acting
  • Number: THEA 121
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of acting for those students who have little or no experience in the theatre. We will overview all the tools used by actors, including improvisation, vocal, physical and psychological warm-ups, building trust, relaxation and discipline techniques. Students will complete a minimum of three in-class performances. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Model proper use of theatre nomenclature and vocabulary.
  2. Engage in exercises that develop the actor's instrument by improving vocal ability, physical agility and the ability to concentrate.
  3. Exhibit enhanced emotional and sensory awareness.
  4. Explore foundational approaches in creating a character.
  5. Complete thoroughly rehearsed acting exercises, scenes or monologues which demonstrate an understanding of the actor's craft.
  6. Engage in thoughtful criticism of the work of other actors and of oneself.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Theatre Nomenclature and Vocabulary

A. Define and explain terms used to discuss the work of the actors.

B. Demonstrate the vocabulary through written and performance work.

II. Exercises for the Actor's Instrument

A. Investigate relaxation techniques.

B. Perform specific exercises to enhance physical agility, balance and strength.

C. Show an increasing ability to maintain focus and concentration.

III. Emotional and Sensory Awareness

A. Practice imagination and recall exercises.

B. Experiment with imagination and sense memory in daily work with partners.

C. Practice spatial awareness through exercises.

IV. Foundational Approaches in Creating a Character

A. Define and explain concepts and terms related to character analysis.

1. Goal (objective, intention)

2. Others (obstacles)

3. Tactics (strategies, actions)

4. Expectation (drive, energy, motivation)

B. Practice these concepts in performances and daily work with partners.

V. Acting Exercises, Scenes, and Monologues

A. Complete an analysis which states the character's goals, obstacles and tactics.

B. Accomplish several readings and rehearsals of the exercises, scenes or monologues.

C. Perform the exercise, scene or monologue in front of the class.

D. Present a well-rehearsed audition monologue with a proper introduction.

VI. Critical Analysis of Performances

A. Participate in constructive oral criticism of one's own work and the work of others.

B. Attend performances of theatre productions.

C. Write at least two critical responses to theatre productions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-20%    Class attendance and participation (as defined in the instructor's syllabus)
20-30%    Live theatre productions reviews (min. of two)
60-70%    Rehearsal and performance of at least three performance projects

100%       Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 121H

No information found.

THEA 123

  • Title: Improvisation for the Theater*
  • Number: THEA 123
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: THEA 130.

Description:

The student will be introduced to theater improvisation, which will emphasize creative stage activities not requiring a written script. Participation in activities of this course will release and enhance the work of serious acting students and show the students how to approach characterization viscerally rather than intellectually, spontaneously rather than intentionally. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Increase concentration skills.
  2. Enhance observation skills.
  3. Create characters using non-verbal strategies.
  4. Demonstrate a heightened awareness of the physical space.
  5. Work cooperatively and interdependently in group situations. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Increase Concentration Skills
   A. Develop relaxation techniques.
   B. Develop focusing and centering techniques.
      1. Explore energy sharing.
      2. Explore shifting centers of gravity.

II. Enhance Skills in Observation
   A. Develop observation exercises.
      1. Explore mirroring exercises.
      2. Explore sculpting exercises.
   B. Learn how to respond to changes in environment.
      1. Adapt to differing sound stimuli.
      2. Adapt to differing movement patterns.

III. Create Characters Using Non-Verbal Strategies
   A. Explore mask work.
   B. Explore body shaping.
   C. Explore rhythm and motion exercises.

IV. Demonstrate a Heightened Awareness of the Physical Space
   A. Create tension in space.
      1. Apply tension through machines.
      2. Apply tension through geometrics.
      3. Apply tension through the physical space.
   B. Create physical tension between two or more participants.

V. Work Cooperatively and Interdependently in Group Situations
   A. Develop effective scene improvisations.
   B. Develop effective solo improvisations.
   C. Develop extended storytelling techniques.
      1. Create expanded fairy tales.
      2. Construct group stories.
      3. Learn collaborative techniques.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance                                   20% of grade
Class participation and individual progress  30% of grade
Journal                                      30% of grade
Weekly oral assessment                       20% of grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 130

  • Title: Acting I*
  • Number: THEA 130
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: THEA 121 (with a grade of "C" or higher) or department approval.

Description:

Acting I will expand on the skills learned in Fundamentals of Acting and will concentrate on developing scene work. Emphasis will be on expanding creative potential through exercises in self-awareness, posture, movement, voice and personality projection. Students will complete a minimum of four in-class performances. 3 hrs./wk. plus rehearsals and performances.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Read and discuss plays from a variety of genres.
  2. Describe emotional and sensory awareness and creatively tap into that awareness for use in performances.
  3. Perform basic character analysis.
  4. Perform memorized, contemporary monologues and scenes that are carefully and thoughtfully rehearsed and presented in final form.
  5. Engage in thoughtful criticism of the work of other actors and of oneself.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Dramatic Literature Genres

A. Read a variety of plays.

B. Discuss your play journal.

II. Emotional and Sensory Awareness

A. Practice imagination and recall exercises.

B. Experiment with imagination and sense memory in daily work with partners.

C. Employ imagination/sense memory work in preparation of scenes and monologues.

III. Character Analysis

A. Identify an approach to analyzing character.

B. Practice this approach in assigned exercises and scene work.

IV. Contemporary Monologues and Scenes

A. Analyze the assigned scenes and monologues to determine the given circumstances of the scripts.

B. Rehearse the scenes and monologues to discover believable physical actions and bold choices.

C. Perform the memorized scenes and monologues for the class.

D. Present a well-rehearsed audition monologue with a proper introduction.

V. Critical Analysis of Performances

A. Participate in constructive oral criticism of one's own work and the work of others.

B. Attend performances of theatre productions.

C. Write at least two critical responses to a live theatre production.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

5-15%    Class attendance and participation (as defined in the instructor's syllabus)
10-20%    Play reading journal
15-25%    Live theatre productions reviews (min. of two)
40-60%    Rehearsal and performance of at least four performance projects
5-15%    Examination(s) of theatre vocabulary and readings

100%     Total

See individual instructor's syllabus for specifics of how these methods of evaluation are weighted.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 130H

No information found.

THEA 131

  • Title: Voice and Speech
  • Number: THEA 131
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The student will develop techniques to expand breath support, vocal range and dynamics; learn precise articulation; and strengthen the connection between thought and sound. Through the use of exercises to free, develop and strengthen the voice, the student will be better able to communicate the full range of human emotion and all the nuances of thought. Skills acquired in this course are essential for actors, broadcast journalists, educators and other public speakers. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the fall semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the physiological mechanics of the voice.
  2. Develop a relaxation process to free up the voice.
  3. Direct the voice through all the resonators.
  4. Access breath for power in communication.
  5. Incorporate vocal dynamics directly into the spoken text.
  6. Demonstrate productive work habits in the classroom. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Explain the physiological mechanics of the voice.
   A. Identify parts of the anatomy and physiology of the vocal
mechanism.
      1. diaphragm
      2. lungs
      3. larynx
      4. vocal folds
      5. teeth, lips, tongue
   B. Recognize how the 'need to communicate' affects the body as a
process.
      1. nerve impulse
      2. breath response
      3. phonation
      4. articulation
      5. amplification through resonators
   C. Explore the relationship between pitch and resonators.
   D. Identify articulators.
      1. lips
      2. teeth
      3. gum (alveolar) ridge
      4. tongue
      5. hard palate
      6. soft palate
   E. Identify factors which inhibit the voice.
      1. habitual blocking of reflex action due to conditioning or social
demands
      2. tension
      3. strong emotion
      4. posture

II. Develop a relaxation process to free up the voice.
   A. Recognize vocal habits and distinguish them from new experiences.
   B. Develop flexibility and strength to support the voice.
      1. the spine
      2. the joints
      3. the muscles
      4. resisting gravity
      5. breath support
      6. energy
   C. Explore the breathing process.
      1. involuntary muscle reactions
      2. restrictive tensions
      3. natural rhythm
      4. oxygen exchange
   D. Develop the first stages of a vocal warm-up.
      1. awareness
      2. mental focus
      3. natural breathing
      4. 'touch of sound'
      5. vibrations
      6. muscle relaxation

III. Direct the voice through all the resonators.
   A. Identify characteristics of the different resonators.
      1. pitch
      2. rhythm
      3. mood
      4. vulnerability
   B. Isolate the various resonators.
      1. chest
      2. oral cavity
      3. teeth
      4. nasal cavity and sinuses
      5. skull
   C. Link the resonators together.
      1. range
      2. breath
      3. energy
   D. Work through the point where the voice breaks between 'head voice'
and 'chest voice'.

IV. Access the breath for power in communication.
   A. Explain the different types of breathing.
      1. abdominal
      2. diaphragmatic
      3. intercostal
   B. Develop additional warm-up techniques to increase access to breath.
      1. imagery
      2. six-sided box
      3. 'vacuuming' the lungs
      4. 'breath of fire'
      5. 'sigh of relief'
      6. anticipation
      7. meditation
      8. 'power center'
   C. Identify habits that interfere with communication.
      1. muscle tension
      2. forced (strident) voice
      3. decreased lung capacity (lack of postural support)
      4. emotional shut-down

V. Incorporate vocal dynamics directly into the spoken text.
   A. Distinguish between vowel and consonant sounds.
      1. fricatives
      2. plosives
      3. nasals
   B. Distinguish between voiced and unvoiced consonants.
   C. Combine the forward (bell) tone with the dropped jaw for flow.
   D. Demonstrate vocalization of all the vowels.
      1. neutral 'hah'
      2. lip vowels
      3. tongue vowels
   E. Develop a full vocal warm-up, including:
      1. relaxation
      2. free breathing
      3. lengthened spine
      4. resonators
      5. articulators

VI. Demonstrate productive work habits in the classroom.
   A. Identify and develop positive attitude, including:
      1. giving and accepting constructive criticism
      2. maintaining a positive, safe work environment
      3. developing specific listening skills
   B. Develop productive work habits, including:
      1. completion of assignments on time
      2. preparation for in-class assignments
      3. observation of others' work

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

. Oral assignments                              60% of grade 
  (should include a minimum of four texts,
   in both prose and verse)
. Participation                                 30% of grade
  (includes attendance and willingness to work)
. Tests                                         10% of grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 133

  • Title: Technical Practicum I
  • Number: THEA 133
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

Students gain practical experience in technical theater in this course. The student completes the course objectives by working in the theatre department's productions and/or working in the scene/costume shop during the semester. 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Participate in the staging and/or costuming techniques required for theatrical productions.
  2. Identify the basic parts and functions of the theatrical facility.
  3. Use basic tools and equipment related to theatre.
  4. Exercise selected procedures related to running a theatrical performance.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Participation in Theatre Department Productions

A. Work as a member of the running crew on a department production. Positions include but are not limited to stagehand, followspot operator, light board operator, sound board operator, assistant stage manager, wardrobe crew, dresser, etc.

and/or

B. Pre-performance work in the theaters, scenery or costume shops constructing and assembling the productions. This work involves hands-on use of carpentry and construction tools, sewing machines, stage equipment and painting/decorating implements.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

The student's final grade will reflect successful completion of the following assignments:

  1. Attendance at required rehearsals and performances.
  2. Completion of assigned tasks.
  3. Professionalism, as exhibited by punctuality, cooperation with instructors and other students, and care of equipment and materials.
  4. Completion of required hours.

Grade Criteria:

82 hours or more = A
70 - 82 hours = B
58 - 70 hours = C
36 - 58 hours = D
36 hours or below = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 134

  • Title: Performance Practicum I
  • Number: THEA 134
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This course will enable students to gain practical experience in performance-related aspects of college theater productions. Admission may be granted upon being cast in a JCCC production. 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Audition for a production and be cast in a role.
  2. Develop a character intended for live performance.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of stage directions.
  4. Rehearse cooperatively with a director and members of the cast and crew.
  5. Enhance the character through the use of make-up and costume.
  6. Participate in performances. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Audition for a Production and Be Cast in a Role
   A. Prepare for the audition as requested by the director, which may
include:
      1. Prepared monologues.
      2. Cold readings of scenes.
      3. Improvisations.
   B. Perform the audition.
   C. Participate in callbacks.

II. Attend Rehearsals and Meetings as Required by the Director and
Designers
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes appropriate for the theatre,
including preparation as required for each rehearsal and the ability to
take constructive criticism from the director.
   B. Identify and exhibit productive work habits, including prompt and
active participation in scheduled activities, efficiency during
rehearsals, and other behaviors as outlined in the department's "Company
Policies."
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
working with peers and responding to supervision.

III. Complete Homework as Assigned
   A. Analyze the character through use of such tools as character
biography, GOTE sheet, intensive re-reading of the script, research, etc.
   B. Meet deadlines set by the director in a timely manner.

IV. Perform the Play Before a Live Audience
   A. Exhibit promptness in arriving for all calls (for makeup, warm-ups,
"places," etc.).
   B. Perform the role as rehearsed.
   C. Attend post-production responses.
   D. Assist with strike of the set, lights, and costumes.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Punctual attendance at rehearsals and other scheduled activities
2. Satisfactory performance of assigned role(s)
3. Professionalism as exhibited by preparation and cooperation with the
director, designers, cast and crew

Although attendance is essential, productive attitudes and work habits
affect morale, efficiency, and overall artistic endeavor in the theatre,
and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and
teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 135

  • Title: Stage Makeup
  • Number: THEA 135
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 1

Description:

An introductory course designed to provide an understanding of, and practical skill in, the design and application of makeup for theatrical performance. 1 hr. lecture, 1 hr. lab/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify different mediums of makeup and the application thereof.
  2. Analyze the traits that create a character.
  3. Design makeup based on character traits and standard application techniques.
  4. Describe and use the principles and materials of special effects makeup.
  5. Explain the design and care of hairpieces. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Principles of Makeup for Theatre and Film
   A. Facial anatomy
      1. Identify and name the bones of the face.
   B. Light and shade
      1. Explain why the principles of light and shade (chiaroscuro) are
important for stage makeup.
      2. Demonstrate in drawing how light and shade fall differently on
flat and curved surfaces.
      3. Define hard and soft edges and identify areas of the face which
contain each.
      4. Describe how highlights and shadows can create or emphasize
features of the face.
   C. Color in makeup
      1. Define and use the basic color terms: hue, intensity and value.
      2. Mix pigments to create new colors and values of a color using the
color wheel.
      3. Recognize and identify makeup colors using the Corson color
system.
   D. Lighting and makeup
      1. Describe and give examples of colored light on pigment.
      2. Explain how lighting changes and direction may affect makeup.

II.   Planning the Makeup
   A. Relating the makeup to the character
      1. Research fictional and historical characters using a variety of
sources and input.
      2. Analyze character using the seven primary factors:  genetics,
environment, health, disfigurements, fashion, age, and personality; and
identify the significance of each.
      3. Create a makeup  morgue" of photographs and research representing
a variety of features and categories for each of the seven character
factors.
   B. Designing the makeup
      1. Describe the role and responsibilities of the makeup designer.
      2. Collect character sketches to be used in makeup design.
      3. Design a makeup and adapt it to the photograph of the actor.
      4. Complete a makeup worksheet for a design, including sketch and
all pertinent information and instructions.

III.  Applying the Makeup
   A. Makeup equipment
      1. List basic equipment needed for the makeup room.
      2. Identify equipment needed specifically for the makeup lab or
workshop.
      3. Identify basic makeup materials and supplies.
   B. Applying various types of makeup
      1. Practice applying cake makeup, dry makeup and creme makeup using
proper techniques and tools.
      2. Describe the steps used in applying soft greasepaint.
   C. Corrective makeup
      1. Analyze a face for corrections needed in straight makeup.
      2. Apply corrective makeup to various facial features using
prescribed techniques.
      3. Change three major features to create a new look using the makeup
morgue.
   D. Stippling
      1. List and explain the uses of stippling.
      2. Use stippling in one or more makeups to add texture, color or
reduce contrast.
   E. Modeling with highlights and shadows
      1. Model hard and soft edges in makeup on the skin.
      2. Identify the planes of the face and which should be highlighted
and/or shadowed for straight makeup and age makeup.
      3. Apply highlights and shadows to the five areas of the face for
both straight and age makeup.
      4. List methods for blocking out eyebrows and perform one as
assigned.
      5. Use highlights and shadows in application projects.
   F. Three-dimensional makeup
      1. List and describe materials used to create three-dimensional
makeup.
      2. Create a three-dimensional makeup using prescribed techniques.
      3. Outline the techniques for special constructions in 3-D makeup.
   G. Prosthetic makeup
      1. Define prosthetic makeup and differentiate it from  3-D" makeup.
      2. Explain negative and positive molding processes.
      3. Identify and distinguish prosthetic pieces made from liquid and
foam latex.
      4. Perform the process of applying and disguising a prosthetic
piece.
   H. Beards and mustaches
      1. Describe the types of facial hair pieces available and the
materials for creating them.
      2. List the steps for applying both crepe hair and ventilated
mustaches and beards.
   I. Hair and wigs
      1. Explain the significance of proper hairstyle as part of the
makeup.
      2. List methods of changing the look or hairline of the actor's own
hair.
      3. Identify basic types and shapes of wigs and their construction.
      4. Describe care, alteration and fitting of wigs.
   J. Special makeup problems
      1. Analyze a historical character for features which could be
recreated on the actor's face.
      2. Design a nonrealistic makeup using stylization and inspirational
research.
      3. Explain the problems and solutions used in quick change makeup.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

      Makeup design and application projects 50% of grade
      Makeup morgue                          10% of grade
      Written exams                          25% of grade
      Class participation/attendance         15% of grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 136

  • Title: Costume Construction
  • Number: THEA 136
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This is a survey of the theory, techniques and skills used in costume creation for the theater and film. Areas of study and practice include basic construction, patterning and cutting; fabrics, design and realization; millinery; craftwork; and organization. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use an industrial and domestic sewing machine, serger and other basic costume shop equipment.
  2. Discuss the theory and process of costume design and production.
  3. Identify basic pattern pieces; draft and construct a fitting sloper from basic actor measurements.
  4. Identify a variety of types and fabrics and trims and understand their uses and limitations.
  5. Demonstrate the scope and uses of craft work in costuming for the theatre and perform simple craft techniques.
  6. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the costume shop. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Costuming
   A. Describe the role of Costuming in theatre/film, providing specific
examples.
   B. Outline the elements and process of designing costumes for theatre.
   C. Trace the major developments in the history of costume design.
   D. Explore the importance of the study of costume history in costume
design and construction.

II. The Costume Shop
   A. Identify and explain the use of all basic equipment and tools needed
in the costume shop.
   B. Correctly operate each major piece of costume shop equipment
including:
      1. Industrial straight/zigzag machine
      2. Domestic sewing machine
      3. Domestic serger
      4. Industrial serger
      5. Industrial iron
   C. Perform basic stitches and function using small hand tools.
   D. List and demonstrate safe shop practices.

III. Costume Realization
   A. Plan and prepare for the design process.
      1. Demonstrate the strategies of the design process.
         a. Research for authenticity the styles and details appropriate
to the show's/project's period and culture.
         b. Effective plan for costume sources:  building vs. found
costume pieces.
         c. Render the design and any appropriate variations of a
costume.
      2. Measure actors/classmates using appropriate techniques and
completing a comprehensive measurement form.
      3. Identify the major types of fabric and name fiber content and
characteristics.
      4. Select appropriate fabric for designs/projects based upon the
following criteria:
         a. Authenticity and appropriateness to the designs
         b. Workability
         c. Durability
         d. Cost
      5. Plan for purchase and rental of accessories, citing sources.
   B. Construct a costume, including fitting and alteration.
      1. Create patterns for a basic garment.
         a. Demonstrate flat patterning in class project.
         b. Demonstrate patterning by draping in a class project.
      2. Cut a variety of fabrics using proper pattern layout and seam
allowance for both commercial and drafted patterns.
      3. Assemble costume pieces.
         a. Follow the general order for preparation and assembly of
pattern pieces.
         b. Complete preliminary sewing, including tucks, darts, pleats
and gathering.
         c. Sew all major seams, using the appropriate stitch, seam
allowance and alignment.
         d. Construct and attach sleeves, collars, cuffs, plackets and
pockets using proper techniques.
      4. Fit and alter costumes.
         a. Conduct a fitting, checking crucial areas for fit and movement
and recognizing special fitting problems.
         b. Alter both pattern and garment pieces as required utilizing
markings from fitting.
   C. Complete the costume with finishing details.
      1. Identify and apply final trims and embellishments.
      2. Correctly install and name costume fasteners including zippers,
buttons, snaps, velcro, hooks and eyes, and grommets (lacing).
      3. Explain and use dyeing and painting processes for costume.
      4. Discuss rigging of costumes for quick changes, specific stage
actions and special effects.

IV. Accessories and Special Projects
   A. List the various types of accessories that complete the costume.
   B. Describe the importance of appropriate accessories in completing the
costume design.
   C. Outline the processes and materials used in constructing each of the
major categories of accessories/crafts:
      1. Millinery
      2. Jewelry
      3. Armor
      4. Shoes
      5. Masks
   D. Create an accessory of original design using craft tools and
materials as discussed.

V. Organization
   A. Explain the wardrobe manager's tasks before, during, and after the
show.
   B. Discuss an effective storage plan for costumes.
   C. Summarize the care and repair of costumes in wardrobe storage.

VI. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
staff appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Recognize and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording data.
   C. Develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including solving problems in
groups, building consensus and responding to supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30% of grade   A minimum of three exams over text and lecture
material.
    5% of grade   Attendance at two theatrical performances and one
written review.
   50% of grade   Two construction/pattern drafting projects and one craft
project.
   15% of grade   Class participation and completion of in-class
practice/experiences.
Grading Scale: A = 90-100% B = 80-89% C = 70-79% D = 60-69% F = 59% or below

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 137

  • Title: Movement for the Stage
  • Number: THEA 137
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The student will develop techniques to expand kinesthetic awareness, flexibility, physical freedom and the language of movement. Through the use of exercises to free, develop and strengthen physical vocabulary, the student will be better able to communicate the physical life of a character. Skills acquired in this course will include mime, stage combat, commedia, improvisation and circus techniques. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Express the physical life of a character.
  2. Communicate character objectives and emotions through movement.
  3. Engage in exercises that develop the actor's flexibility and strength.
  4. Demonstrate rudimentary stage combat skills.
  5. Perform basic circus techniques.
  6. Demonstrate productive work habits. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Express the physical life of a character.
   A. Identify the different aspects of human physicality, including
      1. age
      2. ethnic origin
      3. body type
      4. internal rhythm
      5. external rhythm
      6. posture
      7. debilitation
   B. Determine one's own physicality using the above categories.
   C. Develop techniques to alter physicality from actor to character,
including
      1. rhythm alteration
      2. breakdown of body postures into "boxes"
      3. manipulation of body "boxes"
      4. breathing
      5. energy centers
   D. Explore altered physicality through improvisations, including
      1. environment
      2. locale
      3. time period
      4. character interaction

II. Communicate character objectives and emotions through movement.
   A. Explore basic human rituals, including
      1. tribal ceremonies
      2. children's games
      3. primitive dance
   B. Determine the physical effects of needs and emotions, including
      1. skin temperature
      2. breathing rate
      3. tension
      4. energy
   C. Explore the pursuit of objectives through external means, including
      1. individual space
      2. use of touch
      3. push vs. pull
      4. extreme expression

III. Engage in exercises which develop the actor's flexibility and
strength.
   A. Identify aspects of the anatomy which affect movement, including
      1. breathing apparatus
      2. spinal alignment
      3. muscular tension
      4. range of movement of the extremities
      5. muscle strength
      6. equilibrium
   B. Develop a warm-up for the body, including
      1. stretching
      2. breathing
      3. strength exercises
      4. flexibility
   C. Explore movement through space, including
      1. habitual patterns of physicality
      2. interaction with objects
      3. postural shaping
      4. spontaneous response

IV. Demonstrate rudimentary stage combat skills.
   A. Demonstrate stage combat safety as it pertains to
      1. the actor
      2. the actor's combat partner
      3. the audience
   B. Develop basic martial arts moves, including
      1. punches
      2. kicks
      3. blocks
      4. slaps
      5. evasions
   C. Create the illusion of real combat for the stage, using
      1. "knaps" (sounds of slaps, punches, etc.)
      2. "selling" the pain
      3. specificity of attack
      4. communication with partner
      5. altered fighting distance
      6. audience sight lines
      7. connectivity of moves

V. Perform basic circus techniques.
   A. Distinguish between "real time" and "clown time" in terms of
      1. moment
      2. desire
      3. focus
      4. absence of logic
   B. Develop basic circus techniques, including
      1. juggling
      2. clowning
      3. acrobatics
      4. mime
      5. size of movement
      6. audience focus

VI. Demonstrate productive work habits in the classroom.
   A. Identify and develop positive attitude, including
      1. giving and accepting constructive criticism
      2. maintaining a positive, safe work environment
      3. developing specific observation skills
   B. Develop productive work habits, including
      1. completion of assignments on time
      2. preparation for in-class assignments
      3. observation of others' work

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

. Attendance                           20% of grade 
. Class participation and exercises    30% of grade 
. Journal                              10% of grade 
. Minimum of three movement projects   30% of grade 
. Written production review            10% of grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 140

  • Title: Basic Stagecraft
  • Number: THEA 140
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces the general student and theater major to basic stagecraft. Through lectures, in-class demonstrations and hands-on experiences, the student will gain a working and appreciative knowledge of technical theater. The course includes 15 lab hours and attendance at two live theatrical productions. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk. This course is typically offered in the fall semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Develop comprehensive and safe working knowledge of stage machinery.
  2. Exercise onstage safety.
  3. Exercise shop safety.
  4. Exercise scenic materials safety.
  5. Exercise technical methods and procedures used by theatre professionals to achieve their goal.
  6. Identify the parts and functions of a theatre building.
  7. Use basic hand and power tools.
  8. Construct scenic elements.
  9. Exercise stage painting and decorating techniques.
  10. Identify and hang a variety of lighting instruments.
  11. Use a computer light board.
  12. Use a sound mixer board and playback components.
  13. Appreciate and enhance the aesthetic experience of attending live productions in the performing arts.
  14. Write an informed technical review.
  15. Discuss viewed productions in class. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Scene Shop Orientation

A. Identify and demonstrate correct usage of hand and power tools.

B. Identify a wide variety of theatrical hardware and fasteners.

C. Identify and be aware of the properties of a variety of scenic materials.

D. Exercise shop safety rules.

II. Graphics and Standards for the Performing Arts

A. Be able to use and comprehend scale and the scale ruler.

B. Comprehend and utilize USITT Graphics and Standards.

C. Read a tape measure.

D. Read working drawings.

III. Scenic Construction Techniques

A. Select appropriate building materials.

B. Exercise use of correct building techniques.

C. Build scenic elements such as flats, platforms, sculpture, etc.

IV. The Stage and Its Equipment

A. Identify the following:

1. The stagehouse

2. Counterweight rigging systems

3. Masking, curtains and drops

4. Catwalks, booths, galleries, grids, traps and elevators

B. Safely use the above equipment and areas.

V. Electrical Theory and Practice

A. Comprehend electricity and its parts and laws.

B. Exercise and comprehend electrical safety.

VI. Lighting Production and Technology

A. Identify a wide variety of lighting instruments and their structural makeup.

B. Correctly hang and focus lighting equipment.

C. Comprehend and use theatrical computer lighting control boards.

D. Identify a wide variety of lighting accessories.

VII. Scenic Painting and Decoration

A. Identify and describe scenic and commercial paints, dyes and materials.

B. Identify and use a wide variety of paint and dye applicators.

C. Comprehend basic color theory and paint mixing.

VIII. Stage Properties

A. Differentiate between a variety of theatrical properties and their usage.

B. Develop a theoretical knowledge of their acquisition/procurement.

IX. Sound Production and Technology

A. Identify a variety of sound equipment including:

1. Mixer board and patch panels

2. Amplifiers and pre-amps, speakers and microphones

3. Analog and digital playback components

B. Safely operate and patch the above components and equipment.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  1. A minimum of three exams.
  2. Completion of assigned tasks and assignments.
  3. Class participation in practical experiences.
  4. Completion of required lab hours.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 145

  • Title: Introduction to Theater Design
  • Number: THEA 145
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This lecture and studio class introduces the theory and practice of theater design and the graphics and standards of entertainment technology. Emphasis will be on the processes and practices used in designing for the performing arts. Using course-taught computer and hand-based drawing techniques, the student will create a portfolio of his or her work through in-class projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk. This course is typically offered in the spring semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Create basic scenic and lighting designs for the stage, screen, and television.
  2. Complete a portfolio of his/her design work from the course.
  3. Read and draw a variety of two-dimensional scale drawings.
  4. Render basic three-dimensional scale drawings and white models.
  5. Use computer-aided drafting and drawing for the theatre.
  6. Read and use the industry-wide graphics and standards in the performing arts, as set down by the United States Institute for Theatre Technology, Inc. (USITT). 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Comprehend and practice the four R's" of theatre design.
   B. Execute script analysis.

II. Graphics and Standards
   A. Be able to use tape measures and scale rulers.
   B. Identify drawing types and views.
   C. Identify and comprehend USITT standards.
   D. Demonstrate an understanding of personal styles.

III. Basic Drafting Techniques
   A. Practice correct line weights and lettering.
   B. Demonstrate techniques of orthographic and isometric projections.
   C. Complete assigned drafting projects.

IV. Computer-Aided Drawing for the Theatre
   A. Overview the PC environment.
   B. Comprehend and use the basics of Mini-CAD.
   C. Comprehend the use of CAD in the theatre.
   D. Complete a two-dimensional computer project.

V. Rendering Techniques
   A. Perspective drawings.
      1. Execute  compositional elevations.
      2. Execute grid perspective.
      3. Execute drop point perspective.
   B. Model building.
      1. Build a white model.
      2. Discuss the use of painted models in the theater.
   C. Comprehend the use of optional views.
   D. Execute a rendering project.

VI. Scene Design
   A. Discover the historical backgrounds to theatrical design.
      1. Discuss the influences of realism on theatre design.
      2. Discuss the influences of anti-realism on theatre design.
   B. Learn basic artistic composition.
   C. Learn the elements of design.
   D. Learn basic color theory.
   E. Overview properties design.
   F. Execute a scene design project.

VII. Lighting Design
   A. Discover the historical background.
   B. Comprehend the process of lighting design.
      1. Execute and read light plots and circuit sheets.
      2. Use color mixing theory for light.
   C. Execute lighting design project.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

•  Studio projects including at least one scene design and one light
design project.
•  Two tests over lecture material and text.
•  Final portfolio review.
•  Class participation and in-class drawing studies.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 209

  • Title: Script Analysis
  • Number: THEA 209
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Script Analysis introduces students to those methods used in the theater for the study and/or analysis of plays. Directors, actors and designers use script analysis during their preparatory work and then continue to use it through the rehearsal process until, and sometimes even after, the production has finished. This course is of value to the student because it focuses on the crucial elements of a play encountered during the production process including dramatic structure, content and meaning. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically offered in the fall semester only.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Articulate how the dramatic script serves as the primary source of information for theatrical performance.
  2. Develop a system for analyzing and evaluating different types of scripts from the standpoint of their theatrical requirements and aesthetic qualities.
  3. Use basic research techniques in the analysis of a play script in order to identify elements of dramatic structure and characteristics of dramatic genre.
  4. Communicate clearly her/his ideas about dramatic literature, the production requirements of particular plays, and shaping the performance experience for the stage. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction-The Reason for Script Analysis
   A. Explain why play analysis takes place in the theatrical production
process.
   B. Describe what is involved in conducting a script analysis.

II. The Process of Script Analysis Begins
   A. Describe how the first reading of a play creates the foundation for
subsequent steps in the analysis process.
      1. Identify how one determines what the production wants to
accomplish.
      2. Describe how the first reading of a play is conducted.
   B. Explain the structural nature of different dramatic genres as they
affect theatrical productions.
  
III. The Information-gathering Process and How it is Used in Script
Analysis
   A. Describe how the given circumstances of a play are determined.
      1. Define the roles played in script analysis by the locale, social
setting, and cultural norms created by the playwright.
      2. Utilize information gathering techniques to develop the given
circumstances of a play.
      3. Describe what “backstory” means in script analysis.
   B. Identify the difference between a theatrical contract and a
theatrical convention.
      1. Explain the differences involved in the creation of
presentational and representational productions.
      2. Identify and describe the difference between realistic and
non-realistic methods of staging.

IV. A Valid and Useful Script Analysis of a Selected Play
   A. Determine how characters are delineated in a script.
      1. Use stage directions to find character information.
      2. Evaluate the language, dialogue, and physical actions of the
characters so as to better understand who they are and what they are
trying to accomplish in the play (What they say, what they do, and what
others say about them).
   B. Determine how the conflict in a play is presented.
      1. Describe how character and conflict both affect and interact with
one another.
      2. Explain the basic concepts of conflict analysis as used in a
script analysis.
      3. Create a conflict matrix for a scene in a play using a clear
analytical method.
      4. Identify the impact of conflict on the theme of a play.
   C. Relate those other elements of drama present within a play to the
conflict that the playwright has created.
   D. Decide on how to set the play (where, when, style, mood, etc.), and
discuss the implications of this decision on the design team.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  Examinations (minimum of two)
  Research project (a completed script analysis of a play chosen in
consultation with the instructor).
  Class attendance and participation in class discussions
  In-class assignments and short scene analyses
  Attendance at a minimum of two productions with reports/analyses of the
same

See the individual instructor's syllabus for specifics of how these
methods of evaluation are weighted and the grading scale to be used.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students are required to attend the theatre department’s productions during the semester they are enrolled in the course. A ticket charge may be required for this. Attendance at other plays being presented in the area is encouraged.  

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 225

  • Title: Reader's Theater
  • Number: THEA 225
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Students will combine acting, interpretation and rhetoric as they analyze and perform poetry, prose and dramatic literature and present public performances. Through the process of reading, studying, investing, rehearsing and performing literary and nonliterary works, the student will learn to pay particular attention to the voice embodied in a given text and the cultural and social context within which that voice speaks. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. plus rehearsals. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Further develop performance techniques appropriate for oral interpretation.
  2. Develop performance techniques appropriate for readers theatre.
  3. Compile thematically unified scripts from a wide body of literature.
  4. Present readers theatre for public and/or educational performances.
  5. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the classroom. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Performance Techniques for Oral Interpretation
   A. Use physical qualities that clarify the interpreted literature.
   B. Use vocal qualities that clarify the interpreted literature.
   C. Use emotional and sense memory to clarify the interpreted
literature.
   D. Prepare effective introductions to solo interpretations.

II. Performance Techniques for Readers Theatre
   A. Describe the purpose of presentational theatre.
   B. Develop physical and vocal qualities that clarify the interpreted
literature.
   C. Describe the role of the interpreter.
   D. Demonstrate appropriate styles of delivery, such as:
      1. Developing methods for using the manuscript.
      2. Creating and changing the interpreter-audience relationship
through manipulation of the physical space.
      3. Using chairs, cubes, stools, and the floor to complement the
script.

III. Compiling Thematically Unified Scripts
   A. Describe types of organizational formats.
      1. Single text script
      2. Expanded script
      3. Collage script
   B. Integrate non-fiction sources.
      1. Personal narratives
      2. Diaries and letters
      3. Biographies, autobiographies, and histories
      4. Letters
   C. Differentiate between chamber theatre and readers theatre.
      1. Describe and perform narrative points of view.
      2. Distinguish virtual present from virtual past.
      3. Create chamber theatre scripts adapted from narrative fiction.

IV. Public and/or Educational Performances
   A. Participate in service-learning opportunities.
      1. Senior citizen communities
      2. Elementary, middle, and/or high schools
   B. Perform in formal programs as arranged by instructor or theatre
department.

V. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
classmates appropriate for the classroom and outside rehearsal times.
      1. Giving and accepting constructive criticism
      2. Maintaining a cooperative work environment
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits.
      1. Completing tasks by assigned due dates
      2. Being prepared for in-class rehearsals

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Oral interpretations (minimum of 2)
2. Readers theatre/chamber theatre performances (minimum of 2)
3. Submit typed readers theatre or chamber theatre script
4. Submit typed dramatistic, literary or content analysis (minimum of 2)

See individual instructor's syllabus for specifics of how these methods of
evaluation are weighted.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 230

  • Title: Acting II*
  • Number: THEA 230
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: THEA 130 (with a grade of "C" or higher).

Description:

This continuation of Acting I will focus on more in-depth character analysis and development, emphasizing the actor’s responsibility in creating the character. Students will complete a minimum of five in-class performances. 3 hrs./wk. plus rehearsals and performances.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Execute continued development of the actor's instrument through physical, vocal and sensory exercises.
  2. Exhibit an awareness of how blocking (physical action) communicates character motivation and intention.
  3. Perform memorized, scripted scenes that reflect careful analysis, sufficient rehearsal, the ability to collaborate with scene partners, and the ability to take on scenes of greater complexity.
  4. Perform scenes and monologues that demonstrate an intelligent grasp of non-contemporary plays.
  5. Engage critical oral and written skills regarding the acting process in the classroom and/or in theatrical productions.
  6. Develop greater observation skills.
  7. Read and discuss plays from a variety of genres.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Actor’s Instrument

A. Demonstrate mastery of exercises to increase physical strength, flexibility and balance.

B. Physically manipulate the body to create characterization.

C. Apply imagination and/or sense memory exercises to the acting process.

II. Physical Action

A. Create logical and well-executed movement choices in scene and monologue work.

B. Complete organically motivated blocking choices in scene and monologue work.

III. Advanced Scene and Monologue Work

A. Demonstrate an ability to analyze complex scenes and monologues in greater depth.

B. Work interdependently and cooperatively with scene partners.

C. Apply visceral, active, and bold acting goals, obstacles, and tactics to scene and monologue work.

D. Present a well-rehearsed audition package which includes an acting resumé.

IV. Pre-Realistic and Non-Realistic Plays

A. Demonstrate different acting approaches and styles.

B. Perform verse, blank verse, and/or prose from pre-twentieth century literature.

V. Critical Analysis of Performances

A. Participate in constructive oral criticism of one's own work and the work of others.

B. Attend performances of theatre productions.

C. Write at least two critical responses to live theatre productions.

VI. Observation Skills

A. Identify self-improvement opportunities.

B. Identify physical and vocal characteristics through observation of others.

VII. Dramatic Literature Genres

A. Apply your understanding of different genres through discussion and/or performance.

B. Articulate your understanding of complex play structure through a play journal.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-20%    Class attendance and participation (as defined in the instructor's syllabus)
10-15%    Play reading journal
15-20%    Live theatre productions reviews (min. of two)
50-60%    Rehearsal and performance of at least four performance projects
10-15%    Examination(s) of theatre vocabulary and readings

100%       Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 230H

No information found.

THEA 232

  • Title: Play Reading and Production*
  • Number: THEA 232
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: THEA 120.

Description:

This course is an introductory survey in the process of reading and producing plays. The focus of the course will be on reading a play and understanding the steps necessary to create a production of that play. Some of the topics explored will include play selection, script analysis, the audition process, the rehearsal process, stage management, directing, and the actor-audience-director relationship. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Evaluate important plays of the contemporary theatre.
  2. Demonstrate and apply the various roles of the director.
  3. Demonstrate and apply the various roles of the stage manager.
  4. Identify and compare the different physical relationships between actors and audience.
  5. Critically evaluate theatre productions and identify the strengths and weaknesses in performance.
  6. Demonstrate critical thinking skills: analysis, synthesis, application and evaluation in oral and written form. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Plays of the Contemporary Theatre
   A. Explore dramatic structure in linear and non-linear plays.
   B. Trace plot development in linear and non-linear plays.
   C. Analyze the playwright's intent in contemporary drama.
   D. Investigate the director's process of understanding and interpreting
a play.
      1. Define the dramatic action.
      2. Articulate the spine or action of characters.
      3. Investigate conceptual or interpretive choices regarding design
elements.

II. The Role of the Director
   A. Demonstrate how to cast a play, including:
      1. Structuring an audition.
      2. Conducting call-backs.
   B. Organize a working director's promptbook.
   C. Learn and apply staging techniques, including:
      1. Stage composition.
      2. Stage pictorial elements.
      3. Basic blocking notations.
   D. Plan and conduct productive rehearsals.
      1. Develop an appropriate vocabulary when working with actors and
designers.
      2. Practice time management strategies.
      3. Create effective rehearsal schedules.

III. The Role of the Stage Manager
   A. Organize a working stage manager's promptbook.
      1. Learn and apply blocking notations.
      2. Interpret a basic groundplan.
      3. Create a working production calendar.
   B. Complete rehearsal and performance report forms.
   C. Demonstrate organizational and communication strategies for
technical collaboration.

IV. The Relationship Between Actors and Audience
   A. Utilize the different types of staging.
      1. Arena.
      2. Proscenium.
      3. Thrust.
   B. Explore the different styles of theatre.
      1. Realistic.
      2. Presentational.
   C. Discuss the psychological and physiological audience responses to a
production.

V. Evaluate Productions
   A. Recognize individual styles through form, content, and
personalization.
   B. Recognize the difference between the playwright's intent and
directorial choices.
   C. Attend rehearsals and discuss different directorial rehearsal
approaches.
   D. Analyze and discuss assigned theatre productions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30% Readings and discussions
20-30% Written assignments (could include evaluations of current theatre
productions and short papers over the assigned readings)
25-40% Directing scenes (student directed or stage managed scenes,
accompanied by a director's or stage manager's prompt book)
15-25% Test(s)

Grade Criteria:
A = 90-100%
B = 80- 89%
C = 70- 79%
D = 60- 69%
F = under 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students are required to attend theatre productions during the semester they are enrolled in the course, for which they may have to purchase tickets. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 233

  • Title: Technical Practicum II*
  • Number: THEA 233
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: THEA 133.

Description:

Students gain practical experience in technical theater in this course. The student completes the course objectives by working on the theatre department's productions and/or working in the scene/costume shop during the semester. 4 hrs.lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Participate in the staging and/or costuming techniques required for theatrical productions.
  2. Identify the basic parts and functions of the theatrical facility.
  3. Use basic tools and equipment related to theatre.
  4. Exercise selected procedures related to running a theatrical performance.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Participation in Theatre Department Productions

A. Work as a member of the artistic production team in one of the following capacities: stage manager, scene designer, lighting designer, costume designer, sound designer, assistant to the director.

and/or

B. Work as a member of the running crew on a department production. Positions include but are not limited to stagehand, followspot operator, light board operator, sound board operator, assistant stage manager, wardrobe crew, dresser, etc.

and/or

C. Pre-performance work in the theaters, scenery or costume shops constructing and assembling the productions. This work involves hands-on use of carpentry and construction tools, sewing machines, stage equipment and painting/decorating implements.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  1. Attendance at required rehearsals and performances.
  2. Completion of assigned tasks.
  3. Professionalism, as exhibited by punctuality, cooperation with instructors and other students, and care of equipment and materials.
  4. Completion of required hours.

Grade Criteria:

82 hours or more = A
70 - 82 hours = B
58 - 70 hours = C
36 - 58 hours = D
36 hours or below = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 235

  • Title: Technical Practicum III*
  • Number: THEA 235
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

Description:

Students will gain professional technical theater experience in this course by working as an apprentice for the theater department and an outside professional performing arts agency. While on campus and/or on location, students will build and install a stage and/or scenery as they work alongside theater professionals to execute theatrical productions. 4 hrs. lab/wk. This course is offered in summer only; permission from instructor is required to enroll.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Participate in the staging and scenery construction required for repertory theatrical productions.
  2. Identify the basic parts and functions of the theatrical scene shop.
  3. Use basic tools and equipment related to theatre.
  4. Exercise selected procedures related to mounting a theatrical performance.
  5. Demonstrate productive work habits. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Participate as a theatrical production apprentice.
   A. Work as a member of the load-in crew on professional productions.
   B. Work in one or more of the following positions:
      1. Stagehand
      2. Rigger
      3. Scenic artist
      4. Properties installation

II. Accomplish pre-performance work in the theaters and/or scene shops
constructing and assembling the productions, including:
   A. Hands-on use of carpentry and construction tools and stage
equipment.
   B. Operation of sewing machines and painting/decorating implements.

III. Exhibit professional behavior as exhibited by:
   A. Attendance at required work calls.
   B. Completion of assigned tasks.
   C. Punctuality, cooperation with theatre professionals and fellow
apprentices, and the care of equipment and materials.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

* • Attendance at required work calls.
* • Completion of assigned tasks.
* • Professionalism, as exhibited by punctuality, cooperation with
instructor and co-workers, and care of equipment and materials.
* • Completion of required hours.

Grading Criteria:
160 hours or more = A
140 - 159 hours   = B
139 - 120 hours   = C
119 - 100 hours   = D
99 or fewer hours = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 250

  • Title: Introduction to Costume Design
  • Number: THEA 250
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This course is designed to instruct students on the concepts and realities of costume design. The course will provide hands-on design exercises that will include researching historical time periods, script reading and production analysis, costume rendering techniques, and presenting designs in a production meeting. This course is typically taught in the spring semester. 2 hrs. lecture and 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate textual interpretation through the use of basic elements and principles of design.
  2. Identify, define and describe the key concepts and practices in costume design, both verbally and visually.
  3. Verbally defend and support visual critiques of student's own work as well as the work of others.
  4. Give a descriptive critique of visual concepts and practices as observed through live theatrical performances.
  5. Apply 2D interpretations of scripts through the use of design principles in renderings.
  6. Develop an adequate vocabulary to discuss visual work.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Impact of Costume Design on Production

A. Explore the definition of "costume."

B. Survey history of costume and costume design in early cultures and theatre history:

1. Ritual and dance

2. Religious ceremony and pageants

3. Ancient to modern theatre

C. Determine roles that costumes play in a production.

1. List character traits that are indicated through costume choices.

2. Explore how costume contributes to the production as a whole:

a. Theme, concept, mood

b. Overall design and visual impact

II. Responsibilities of a Costume Designer

A. Describe various design and technical staff positions in a theatre or film production.

B. Identify specific roles and responsibilities of a costume designer.

C. Trace the basic steps in the costume design process from initial reading to completion of production.

1. Read and discuss assigned play

2. Create a costume plot

III. The Role of Research in Costume Design

A. Describe the importance of research in any type of costume design.

B. List possible sources of research for plays and film:

1. Historic plays and film

2. Modern works

3. Fantasy or abstract theatre or film

C. Research an assigned historical period.

1. Create a research board from multiple sources.

2. Present orally and in written outline form the basic characteristics, garments, fabrics, and accessories for the time period assigned.

IV. Basic Elements of Costume Design

A. List and describe the six basic elements of all design:

1. Space

2. Line

3. Shape and form

4. Light

5. Color

6. Texture

B. Relate each of the design elements to costume design and explain their significance.

1. Complete projects based on shape, line and color.

2. Experiment with light and its effect on fabric and color.

3. Explore subliminal and cultural aspects of costume color.

C. Use elements of design to complete a final costume design project for a play.

1. Create a viable color scheme for the final project

2. Use line, shape and texture to indicate character in preliminary and final design sketches

V. Materials, Tools and Techniques

A. Demonstrate a knowledge of common fabric types and their uses; compare and contrast advantages and disadvantages.

B. Define and use common terms used in costume and theatre design.

VI. Key Historical Periods in Costume Design

A. Identify the silhouettes and basic garments of 6 major historical periods of Western fashion:

1. Greek

2. Medieval

3. Renaissance / Elizabethan

4. Restoration

5. 18th Century

6. Victorian

B. Design and illustrate costumes based on one of the six periods of fashion history.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Examinations (minimum of two)
30-40%    Daily or weekly assignments/class participation
25-35%    Final Design Project
5-15%      Production Reviews (two)

Total  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

THEA 291

No information found.

THEA 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: THEA 292
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to performance, technical theatre, and design not normally taught in the curriculum, to interested and qualified students within the program. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Accomplish complex readings and research in the designated topic area
  2. Define key terms and explain concepts within the scope of the topic
  3. Perform skills relevant to the area of study 

Content Outline and Competencies:

Because of the nature of Special Topics, the course outline and competencies will vary, depending on the topic being offered.  Course outlines must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC approved courses with specific objectives, outcomes and using outcome-based language.  It will be up to full-time department faculty and their administrator to determine what topics will be offered and by whom, and to approve course content.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings,
discussion, design or application projects, written assignments, etc.,
dependent upon the needs of the topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%    
  B = 80 –  89%  
  C = 70 –  79%  
  D = 60 -  69%  
  F =  0 –  59%   

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Course work may transfer to universities only as elective credit
  2. A student cannot take more than two Special Topics courses in theatre, one in performance and one in technical theatre 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).