Biology (BIOL)

Courses

BIOL 110   Nutrition for Life (2 Hours)

Designed for students who wish to apply nutrition information to their lives, this course explores how food selection affects body size, body composition, performance, disease resistance, impact on the environment, and longevity. Students will analyze the composition of their diets and develop a plan of action to improve their eating behaviors. This course integrates sustainability concepts.2 hrs. lecture/wk.

BIOL 115   Natural History of Kansas (3 Hours)

Natural History of Kansas describes physical and biological processes that have led to the present Kansas landscape. Physical science topics include geology, climate patterns and soil formation. Biological science topics include ecology and a survey of the plants and animals of Kansas. The course will consider how the physical and biological environment relates to past and present human resource uses. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

BIOL 121   Introductory Biology for Non-Majors (4 Hours)  

This course introduces non-majors to selected concepts and principles that form the foundation of an understanding of how biological systems operate. The importance of scientific methods and processes will be explored. Biological systems will be investigated at a variety of levels, from the chemical to the biosphere, and the unity of diversity of life will be examined in light of evolutionary and genetic processes. 3 hrs. lecture & 2 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

BIOL 124   Oceanus: Essentials of Oceanography (3 Hours)

This course for beginning students focuses on the marine environment as a unique feature of the planet earth and investigates areas of intense scientific and public concern: the pervasiveness of the ocean and its effect on the earth's weather, its stunning physical size and diversity of contained life forms, its contributions to the physical and historical development of man, its impact on geopolitical and economic matters, and the impact of oceanic pollutants and the potential exploitation of marine resources. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

BIOL 125   General Botany (5 Hours)

This is a survey of the life, growth and structure of plants. Divisions of the plant kingdom will be presented with emphasis on life cycles, anatomy, physiology and ecology of major groups. Students will do microscopic and macroscopic analysis of the major division. 7 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

BIOL 125H   HON: General Botany* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

BIOL 127   General Zoology (5 Hours)

This is a survey of the life, structure, and growth of animals. Students will concentrate on identifying animals by their structural characteristics and looking at the role adaptation plays in anatomical and physiological features. Students will do dissections and microscopic analysis of the major phyla. 7 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

BIOL 130   Environmental Science (3 Hours)

Environmental Science seeks to describe problems and solutions associated with human use of natural resources. Students will study the major physical and biological processes that govern the complex interactions in natural ecosystems. Major course topics include human population growth, resource use and pollution. Practical solutions aimed at sustainability will be identified and examined. This is an introductory, nonscience-major survey course. 3 hrs./wk.

BIOL 130H   HON: Environmental Science* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

BIOL 131   Environmental Science Lab* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: BIOL 130.

In this lab, students will learn ecological principles that are necessary for understanding and solving environmental problems. Students will sample the local environment for various types of environmental pollution, conduct lab projects and computer simulations, and attend field trips. Field trips may include a visit to a local wastewater treatment plant, a stream ecosystem and a prairie ecosystem. 2 hrs.lab/wk. plus up to three field trips. BIOL 131 students must be currently enrolled in BIOL 130 or have successfully completed BIOL 130 within the last three years.

BIOL 132   Introduction to Public Health (3 Hours)

This is an introductory course in public health. It provides a background in many areas of public health with an emphasis on the health system and understanding and measuring health, disease and illness. Epidemiology, food safety and animal health will also be examined. Public health emergency preparedness, the public health workforce and public health administration will also be studied. Students will learn about public health nursing, public health education and the role of law and government in public health. Students will also examine environmental and occupational health. The different types of public health professional occupations and future challenges for public health will be examined. 3 hrs lecture/wk.

BIOL 132H   HON: Introduction to Public Health* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

BIOL 134   Principles of Sustainability (3 Hours)

Principles of Sustainability introduces students to the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability and sustainable development. The course will critically examine the use of sustainable principles to guide decision making and problem solving in personal, campus, community and global contexts. Students will engage in a variety of individual, group, campus and community activities and collaborate with campus and community offices and agencies in order to identify, assess and address local sustainability needs. Students will be required to present their projects at a public sustainability forum. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

BIOL 135   Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology (4 Hours)  

This is an integrated lecture and laboratory course for biology majors and students planning to take additional courses in biology. Subjects covered include basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, cellular metabolism, Mendelian and molecular genetics, natural selection and evolution, cell physiology, and development of plants and animals from the single-celled stage to the embryonic stage. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

BIOL 135H   HON: Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

BIOL 140   Human Anatomy (4 Hours)

Students will study gross and microscopic aspects of cells, tissues and organ systems of the human body. They will concentrate on a detailed analysis of the structure of each body system. Integrated lecture and lab, 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

BIOL 140H   HON: Human Anatomy* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

BIOL 144   Human Anatomy and Physiology* (5 Hours)  

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness.

This course provides basic knowledge on human structures and their function. Students will study the relationship of structures to function in the organ systems of the human body. Emphasis will be on the identification of the anatomical features and their functions. This course is integrated lecture and laboratory. 7 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The Open Anatomy Lab, 311 CLB, is available for students enrolled in Human Anatomy and Human Anatomy and Physiology classes at JCCC. Contact your professor, check the schedule outside of 311 CLB or call 913-469-8500, ext. 4124, for hours. A current student ID is required for using the Open Anatomy Lab.

BIOL 144H   HON: Human Anatomy and Physiology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

BIOL 145   Human Anatomy and Physiology Dissection* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: BIOL 144 and department approval.

Students will dissect the cat and study the relationship of structures to function in the organ systems of the cat. In this laboratory course, they will also dissect the cow kidney, heart, brain and eye. Students will compare and contrast these structures and functions with the organ systems of the human body. 2 hrs. lab/wk. Students enrolling in BIOL 145 should have completed BIOL 140 or BIOL 144 and have the approval of the assistant dean.

BIOL 150   Biology of Organisms* (5 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOL 135 or department approval.

This is a survey of the five kingdoms of life. Monera, fungi, protista, plant and animal kingdoms will be presented, with emphasis on life cycles, anatomy, physiology and ecology of the major groups. 7 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

BIOL 155   Bioethics* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOL 121 or high school biology with department approval.

This course introduces students to the scientific, ethical and legal issues relevant to the discipline of biology and those raised by the rapid development of new biological technologies. Students will examine the major theories of ethics, including deontology, utilitarianism, and select others. Topics include: beginning of life issues such as contraception, abortion, and nontraditional methods of human reproduction; end of life issues such as advance healthcare directives and physician-assisted suicide; and other issues such as experimentation on human and animal subjects and human environmental impacts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. BIOL 155 and PHIL 155 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

BIOL 205   General Genetics* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOL 135 with a grade of "C" or higher or the equivalent introductory college-level course with a grade of "C" or higher.

This introductory course emphasizes human heredity using concepts from classical and modern genetics. Themes of advancing technologies and bioethical issues are interwoven in the basic background fabric of the course. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

BIOL 214   Introduction to Teaching Math and Science I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MATH 171 with a grade of "C" or higher or appropriate score on the math placement test or department approval.

This course allows math and science students to explore and develop an appreciation for teaching as a career. To support their learning, students will be introduced to the theory and practice that is necessary to design and deliver quality instruction. They will plan and implement lessons of an inquiry-based curriculum in an elementary classroom during the semester. MATH 214, ASTR 214, BIOL 214, CHEM 214, GEOS 214, PHYS 214 and PSCI 214 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

BIOL 215   Introduction to Teaching Math and Science II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: ASTR 214 or BIOL 214 or CHEM 214 or GEOS 214 or MATH 214 or PHYS 214 or PSCI 214 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Students learn about the middle school environment and work on math and science inquiry-based lesson analysis, design and assessment. Student partners will plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons in a middle school. The course emphasizes writing 5E lesson plans with a focus on the importance of using appropriate questioning and assessment strategies throughout the lesson, as well as how to analyze and modify a lesson based on personal reflections and observer feedback. By the completion of the course, students should be able to reflect on their personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science, and develop a feasible pathway to a career in teaching. MATH 215, ASTR 215, BIOL 215, CHEM 215, GEOS 215, PHYS 215 and PSCI 215 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

BIOL 225   Human Physiology* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOL 140 or BIOL 144.

Prerequisites or corequisites: CHEM 122 or (CHEM 124 and CHEM 125).

This is an introduction to the dynamic functions of the human organism from the chemical and molecular mechanisms that sustain cellular processes through the control systems responsible for homeostasis and the influence of these systems on the cellular function of organ and systems operation. Laboratory investigation using selected biochemical and physiological preparations allows correlation of theory with experimental observations. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

BIOL 225H   HON: Human Physiology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

BIOL 227   Human Pathophysiology* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOL 144 or BIOL 225.

This introduction to the physiology of disease covers common disorders of the body from the cellular to the systemic level. Topics include causes, symptoms, diagnostic tests and treatments of disease. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

BIOL 227H   HON: Human Pathophysiology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

BIOL 230   Microbiology* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: CHEM 122 or CHEM 124 and CHEM 125 or one year of high school chemistry.

This is a general introductory course in microbiology. It provides a background in many areas of microbiology with an emphasis on medical aspects. The structure, physiology, antimicrobial agents, immunology and host-parasite relationship of microorganisms will be studied, with an emphasis on bacteria. 3 hrs./wk.

BIOL 230H   HON: Microbiology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

BIOL 231   Microbiology Lab* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOL 231 students must be currently enrolled in BIOL 230 or have successfully completed BIOL 230 within the last three years.

Students will learn aseptic techniques and apply them in the isolation of pure cultures of bacteria. Students will also perform various staining techniques and chemical tests to identify these bacteria. The response of bacteria to changes in environmental conditions will also be examined. Various life stages of medically important parasites will also be observed. 4 hrs. lab/wk.

BIOL 235   General Nutrition* (3 Hours)  

Prerequisites: [CHEM 122 or (CHEM 124 and CHEM 125)] AND [BIOL 144 or (BIOL 140.

Prerequisites or corequisites: BIOL 225)].

This introductory course provides a basic knowledge of human nutrition. Students will learn the sources and functions of the various nutrients. They will also explore the interaction of diet, disease prevention and treatment. Through the use of a computerized nutrition program, students will analyze their diets for nutritional deficiencies and excesses. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

BIOL 235H   HON: General Nutrition* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

BIOL 240   General Pharmacology* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOL 225.

This course provides a basic understanding of the science of drugs-how they work and what they do. Students will study various drug concepts including mechanism of action, pharmacologic class, pharmaco-kinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical implications. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. Spring.

BIOL 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

BIOL 110

  • Title: Nutrition for Life
  • Number: BIOL 110
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

Designed for students who wish to apply nutrition information to their lives, this course explores how food selection affects body size, body composition, performance, disease resistance, impact on the environment, and longevity. Students will analyze the composition of their diets and develop a plan of action to improve their eating behaviors. This course integrates sustainability concepts.2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:
  2. Recognize the importance of nutrition to his/her health.
  3. Evaluate foods on the basis of nutritional value.
  4. List the major dietary goals for Americans as established by science-based organizations and describe strategies for achieving them.
  5. Analyze a diet using food grouping plans and food composition tables.
  6. Learn reliable techniques for evaluating nutritional claims.
  7. List major disease mechanisms affected by nutrition and describe nutritional therapies.For example, heart disease. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Preparation for a Diet Analysis
   A. Define the six classes of essential nutrients and the role each
plays in a healthy diet plan.
   B. Utilize the units of measurement as required in nutrition.
   C. Locate current food competition tables and describe how they are
used.
   D. Explain food grouping plans and their use for dietary analysis.
   E. Describe the purpose and limitations of food labels, Daily Values
(DV) and Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs).
   F. Assess food habits.
   G. Perform a general nutrition assessment.

II. Food Safety and Quality
   A. Recognize the appropriate vs. inappropriate use of supplements.
   B. Define the FDA food safety regulations.
   C. List the primary microorganisms involved in foodborne illnesses.
   D. Identify the methods necessary to prevent foodborne illness.
   E. Identify the ways food selection impacts the environment.

III. Body Weight, Body Composition and Energy Balance
   A. Recognize the multiple standards for desirable body weight/body
fat.
   B. Describe energy imbalances and their consequences.
   C. Calculate individual energy requirements.
   D. Contrast a sound weight loss plan with weight loss fads and
fallacies.
   E. Compare and contrast eating disorders and their treatments.

IV. Nutrition and Physical Activity
   A. Recognize nutritional implications for various levels of physical
activity.

V. Lifecycle Nutrition
   A. Define the nutritional needs throughout the following life stages:
      1. Pre-conception
      2. Pregnancy and lactation
      3. Infancy
      4. Childhood
      5. Adulthood

VI. Heart Disease
   A. Define and differentiate blood cholesterol versus dietary
cholesterol.
   B. Recognize the types of fat and their relationship to disease risk.
   C. Describe the strategies for reducing cholesterol intake.
   D. Describe the strategies for reducing fat intake.
   E. Describe the strategies for reducing sodium/salt intake.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

80% of total points will be from exams and quizzes
20% of total points will be from a diet analysis and in-class exercises

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 115

  • Title: Natural History of Kansas
  • Number: BIOL 115
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Natural History of Kansas describes physical and biological processes that have led to the present Kansas landscape. Physical science topics include geology, climate patterns and soil formation. Biological science topics include ecology and a survey of the plants and animals of Kansas. The course will consider how the physical and biological environment relates to past and present human resource uses. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the geological processes during the geological eras and periods which formed today's Kansas physiography.

  2. Locate and describe the eleven physiographic areas in Kansas.

  3. List the rock types and fossils found in Kansas.

  4. Relate climate patterns to typical weather conditions in Kansas.

  5. Compare water resources in eastern and western Kansas.

  6. Describe soil formation unique to Kansas soils.

  7. List the major biomes of Kansas and the important plants found in each.

  8. Describe the grassland and deciduous forest biomes in ecological terms.

  9. List major animal groups, major characteristics used in classification, general habits and adaptations.

  10. Relate natural resources in Kansas to past and present human use. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Physical Science Topics
   A. Geology
      1. Describe the geological time line as it relates to Kansas
physiography.
      2. List the destructive/constructive geological processes active in
Kansas.
      3. List and locate the eleven physiographic areas of Kansas.
      4. Describe major fossil groups and where they are found in the
state.
   B. Climate patterns
      1. Describe the general climate type and determining factors for the
state.
      2. Contrast northwest and southeast Kansas with respect to ten
weather factors.
      3. Give temperature and rainfall data, draw a climatogarph.
   C. Soils
      1. List major Kansas soils.
      2. Describe formation factors, soil structure and uses of Kansas
soils.
   D. Water resources
      1. Describe the formation and location of major surface water
resources.
      2. Describe the formation and location of major groundwater
resources.
      3. Contrast water problems in western vs. eastern Kansas.
II. Biological Topics
   A. Plants - Biomes
      1. Locate and describe the three major components of the temperate
deciduous forest biome.
         a. Oak-hickory forest
         b. Cross timbers
         c. Flood plain forest
      2. Locate and describe the three major components of the temperate
grassland biome.
         a. Tall grass prairie
         b. Mixed grass prairie
         c. Short grass prairie
      3. Contract the limiting factors between the deciduous forest and
grassland.
   B. Animals
      1. Describe the use of stream invertebrates to determine water
quality and species diversity.
      2. For the vertebrate groups, i.e., fish, amphibians, reptiles,
birds and mammals
         a. List the characteristics of the group.
         b. Describe the abundance in Kansas.
         c. List the major characteristics used in classification.
         d. Describe adaptations to conditions in the state.
III. Human Impact on the Natural Environment
   A. Describe the major events in the human history of the state
affecting its environment and
resources.
   B. List current land uses in the state.
   C. Describe the major industries in the state.
   D. Describe the major environmental concerns of the state.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class participation, homework assignments, field trip reports - 20% of
grade
Oral (5-10 minutes)/written report (3 pages) on topic of choice from the
course outline - 20% of grade
Tests containing both objective and short answer questions - 60% of grade
Total:  100%


Computer Literacy Expectations:
Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for
the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Off-campus field trips may be required. Students will provide their own transportation. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 121

  • Title: Introductory Biology for Non-Majors
  • Number: BIOL 121
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces non-majors to selected concepts and principles that form the foundation of an understanding of how biological systems operate. The importance of scientific methods and processes will be explored. Biological systems will be investigated at a variety of levels, from the chemical to the biosphere, and the unity of diversity of life will be examined in light of evolutionary and genetic processes. 3 hrs. lecture & 2 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the nature of science.
  2. Illustrate the levels of organization and emergent properties of life.
  3. Describe bioenergetics.
  4. Analyze the importance of reproduction in maintaining the continuity of life.
  5. Apply principles of genetics to unity and diversity of life.
  6. Discuss evolution as the mechanism of change in biology.
  7. Analyze principles of ecology.
  8. Demonstrate scientific laboratory skills. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Nature of Science
   A. Recognize science as a process rather than a collection of "facts."
   B. Identify the major steps of the scientific method.
   C. Apply scientific reasoning to real world problems.
   D. Explain fundamental aspects of good experimental design.
   E. Construct scientific hypotheses that give rise to testable
predictions.
   F. Interpret scientific data presented in charts, graphs, and tables.
   G. Evaluate credibility of sources of scientific information.
   H. Differentiate a scientific hypothesis from a scientific theory.

II. Levels of Organization and Emergent Properties of Life
   A. Predict outcomes of basic molecular interactions in organisms using
concepts of ionic, covalent, and hydrogen bonds.
   B. Infer chemical properties and functions of biological macromolecules
from their structure.
   C. Describe the significance of cellular components common to all
living cells.
   D. Analyze the functional interconnections between major components of
cells.
   E. Illustrate how cells show all the essential properties of living
things.
   F. Recognize cells as the basic unit of organization for all living
things.
   G. Relate structure to function at various levels of biological
organization.
   H. Relate genotype of phenotype.
   I. Extrapolate population-level evolutionary mechanisms to
macroevolutionary processes.
   J. Correlate interactions among biotic and abiotic components to
dynamics at various ecological levels.

III. Bioenergetics
   A. Compare and contrast different forms of energy used by organisms.
   B. Illustrate how the physical laws of thermodynamics apply at various
levels of biological organization.
   C. Relate cell membrane function to its structure.
   D. Explain the role of enzymes in metabolism.
   E. Apply concepts of enzyme activity to biological case studies.
   F. Extrapolate concepts of cellular respiration and photosynthesis to
movement of energy and nutrients in living systems. 

IV. Reproduction
   A. Compare and contrast modes of cellular reproduction between
prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.
   B. Compare and contrast mitotic and meiotic cell division.
   C. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of asexual reproduction
relative to sexual reproduction.
   D. Relate results of cellular reproduction with outcomes at the level
of organismal reproduction.

V. Principles of Genetics
   A. Analyze basic patterns of inheritance in eukaryotic organisms.
   B. Apply the chromosomal theory of inheritance to patterns of
inheritance.
   C. Differentiate genetic from environmental influences on phenotype.
   D. Relate DNA to chromosomes.
   E. Illustrate the significance of complimentary base pairing for DNA
replication and protein synthesis.
   F. Explain how the information encoded in DNA influences the
phenotype.
   G. Infer the implications of mutation at various levels of biological
organization.
   H. Describe how DNA can be manipulated for various genetic
technologies.

VI. Evolution
   A. Predict the effects of various mechanisms of evolution on allele
frequencies in populations.
   B. Identify the conditions necessary for various mechanisms of
evolution to occur.
   C. Explain the significance of reproductive isolation in speciation.
   D. Compare and contrast basic modes of speciation.
   E. Relate classification to phylogeny.
   F. Describe the major processes that lead to patterns of evolution seen
among various organisms.
   G. Differentiate major lineages of organisms from one another.
   H. Explain the evolutionary and biological significance of defining
characteristics of major lineages of organisms.

VII. Principles of Ecology
   A. Differentiate abiotic environmental components from biotic
environmental components.
   B. Correlate interactions among biotic and abiotic environmental
components to dynamics at various ecological levels.
   C. Differentiate the various levels at which ecology is studied from
one another.
   D. Interpret ecological data presented in charts, graphs, and tables.
   E. Analyze the cost and benefits of various ecological strategies
employed by organisms.
   F. Illustrate ways in which humans are a biotic component of the
environment.
   G. Evaluate conservation strategies using concepts of genetics and
mechanisms of evolution.

VIII. Scientific Laboratory Skills
   A. Demonstrate use of technologies appropriate to laboratory and field
studies.
   B. Perform detailed observations of organisms and their environments in
both field and laboratory settings.
   C. Construct scientific hypotheses that give rise to testable
predictions.
   D. Design and perform scientific experiments and observation
protocols.
   E. Analyze quantitative data collected through observation and
experimentation.
   F. Interpret scientific data presented in charts, graphs, and tables.
   G. Draw conclusions from scientific data.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Course grade will be determined through exams, quizzes, practicals,
and additional assignments, which may include, papers, projects,
presentations, homework, etc.

Exams: 45-65% of final grade. At least three (3) exams will be given; if
more than four (4) are given and other designated criteria are met, one
exam may be dropped at the professor's discretion.

Practicals: 15% of final grade. Three (3) laboratory practicals will be
given, each worth 5% of the total course grade.

Quizzes: 5-25% of final grade.

Additional projects, papers, presentations, readings, etc.: 15-35% of
final grade.

Grading scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80- 89%
C = 70- 79%
D = 60- 69%
F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. Students enrolled in a course with a laboratory component should be aware that they will be working with a variety of chemicals, materials, and organisms. Students are expected to practice safe techniques with all equipment, materials, and organisms. Students are responsible for their own health and safety.  

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 124

  • Title: Oceanus: Essentials of Oceanography
  • Number: BIOL 124
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course for beginning students focuses on the marine environment as a unique feature of the planet earth and investigates areas of intense scientific and public concern: the pervasiveness of the ocean and its effect on the earth's weather, its stunning physical size and diversity of contained life forms, its contributions to the physical and historical development of man, its impact on geopolitical and economic matters, and the impact of oceanic pollutants and the potential exploitation of marine resources. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the special nature of the Earth as a "water planet" and recognize its place in the universe.
  2. Compare some of the current theories concerning the origin of the planet and the waters that cover its surface.
  3. Identify the features of the oceans' basins and relate the structures observed to theories of origin.
  4. Discuss the co-evolution of the earth and its resident biology.
  5. Discuss basic chemical oceanography in terms of the special properties of water and dissolved salts and dissolved gases.
  6. Describe the motions of the seas – as currents, waves and tides – in terms of causes and their influences and effects upon the land.
  7. Recognize the adaptations of marine organisms to special properties of the ocean such as light and sound.
  8. Identify the features of special animal groups such as sharks, protozoa and marine mammals.
  9. Realistically assess the resources of the sea in terms of minerals, energy and food.
  10. Discuss the reasons for and the means by which humankind uses and misuses marine resources.
  11. Appraise the nature and power of man's growing interferences with the often subtle interrelationships of the chemistry, physics and biology of earth.
  12. Describe areas of intense scientific interest and public concern such as plate tectonics and earthquake predictions, the impact of ocean pollutants, climate fluctuations, cetacean intelligence, and ocean technology.
  13. Identify the causes of marine pollution and understand the problems of containment and alleviation.
  14. Recognize that all parts of the world are interconnected by the sea and that this planet's last frontier needs help in its preservation. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Water Planet 
   A. Define oceanography and list and briefly describe at leave five
branches of this science.
   B. Discuss science as a way of understanding the universe and
accumulating knowledge.
   C. List the steps in the scientific method and compare and contrast the
terms, hypothesis, theory and law as they are used in science.
   D. Discuss the big bang theory of the origin of the universe including
at least two types of evidence that support this theory.
   E. Explain how and when the sun, solar system, Earth and oceans formed.
 
   F. Discuss three current ideas on how life arose and list the
contributions of Bada, Haldane, Miller and Wächtenhäuser to these
ideas.

II. First Steps
   A. Compare and contrast the early voyages of the Polynesians, Vikings,
Greeks and Chinese, especially their motivations, vessels and seafaring
skills.
   B. Recognize the importance of record-keeping and catography to
voyaging, and the historical role of the Library of Alexandria.
   C. List some of the major contributions to early voyaging of Prince
Henry, Magellan and Columbus.
   D. Recognize the role of Captain James Cook in the history of marine
science, and be aware of his three major voyages.
   E. Describe the United States Exploring Expedition, its objectives and
accomplishments, and its importance in bringing in the United States into
the field of oceanography.
   F. Describe the Challenger Expedition and its major contributions in
marine science.
   G. Chronicle the rise of land-based oceanographic institutions, from
the early beginnings in Naples ad Monaco to the major facilities now
operating in the United States.
   H. List the disciplines in which marine research is being done today,
as it relates to recent advances in data gathering and technology.

III. Making the Pieces Fit
   A. Compare and contrast the classification of Earth’s layers based on
chemical composition versus their classification based on physical
properties.
   B. Describe the layered structure of Earth and understand how the
structure was determined through the study of seismic waves.
   C. Understand Wegener’s evidence for the theory of continental drift
and how this theory was received.
   D. Explain the concepts of buoyancy and isostatic equilibrium and their
relationship to continental drift.
   E. Understand the source of convection and the role it plays in plate
tectonics.
   F. Describe the roles of Benioff and Wadati, Hess and Dietz, Wilson and
the R/V Glomar Challenger in formulating the paradigm of plate tectonics.
   G. Compare and contrast the terms continental drift, seafloor spreading
and plate tectonics.
   H. Explain the evidence, both direct and indirect, for plate tectonic
theory.    

IV. The World in Motion
   A. Describe the three major types of plate boundaries and discuss
specific examples of each.
   B. Describe the formation, movement and fate of the Hawaiian Ridge and
Emperor Seamounts and explain how these features support the theory of
plate tectonics.
   C. Discuss the formation of guyots and terranes and how each is related
to tectonic movements.
   D. Compare and contrast deep and shallow earthquakes and describe the
Wadati-Benioff Zone.
   E. Explain how the patterns of paleomagnetism, seafloor age and
sediment thickness contribute to an understanding of tectonic theory.
   F. Summarize the major types of evidence that support the  theory of
plate tectonics and list at least five significant unanswered questions
about this process.

V. Over the Edge
   A. Discuss the history of bathymetry from the early voyagers to the
scientists of today.
   B. Understand the modern techniques and technologies (both shipboard
and satellite) used to describe and study the ocean floor and the variety
of specially designed and instrumented vessels.
   C. Describe the features and boundaries characterizing the continental
shelf, shelf break, slope and rise.
   D. List the various types of continental margins and their
relationships to the plate margins.
   E. Compare and contrast manned and unmanned undersea research vessels
regarding their basic construction, operation and capabilities.
   F. Explain Earth’s oceanic ridge system and how it relates to the
lithospheric plates.
   G. Discuss the hydrothermal vent phenomenon – how it works, its
biological and physical aspects, and its potential for research and
exploitation.
   H. Describe the abyssal plain – its extent and boundaries, relief
features and sources of sediment.
  
VI. The Ocean’s Memory
   A. Characterize the distribution of the major seafloor sediment types,
and how they can be associated with the more sediment-free relief
features.
   B. Discuss the role of sediments in constructing a history of recent
seafloor formation.
   C. List and describe the major criteria used to classify marine
sediments.
   D. Compare and contrast the sediments of the continental margins and
those of the deep-sea floor.
   E. Describe the biological and chemical diversity of the biogenous
sediments.
   F. Discuss the growing commercial interest in marine sediments,
including their potential as a resource and recovery methods.
   G. Characterize the technologies involved in seafloor sediment study:
locating, profiling, recovering and laboratory analysis.
   H. Explain the basic processes involved in the formation of oil and gas
in marine sediments.
   I. Explain how knowledge of marine sediments can aid in describing
Earth’s historical climatic changes and magnetic field orientation.

VII. It’s in the Water
   A. Describe the structure and characteristics of water molecules and
explain how these contribute to the global thermostatic effects of water
on Earth’s climate.
   B. Describe the factors that regulate the density of seawater and
explain the nature and importance of the thermohaline circulation.
   C. Describe the sources, composition and measurement of the ocean’s
salinity and outline the colligative properties of water.
   D. Discuss the principle of constant proportions and compare, contrast
and give examples of conservative and non-conservative constituents of
seawater.
   E. Compare and contrast the general distribution, concentration and
roles of dissolved carbon dioxide and dissolved oxygen in the ocean.
   F. Explain the relationship between carbon dioxide and the greenhouse
effect and the interplay of oceanic and atmospheric carbon dioxide in
global warming.
   G. Explain why some scientists believe that adding iron to the oceans
could affect atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming.    

VIII. Beneath the Surface
   A. Describe the general density stratification of the oceans and
explain why it exists and how it differs in tropical, temperate and polar
oceans.
   B. Compare and contrast the euphotic, disphotic, and aphotic zones of
the ocean.
   C. Compare and contrast the following ocean zones: epipelagic,
mesopelagic, bathypelagic, abyssopelagic, and hadopelagic.
   D. Discuss how the quantity and wavelength of light changes as it
passes through seawater and list some ways this affects marine life.
   E. Draw a profile illustrating how the speed of sound changes with
depth in the ocean.
   F. Explain how these changes create the sofar layer and the shadow
zone.
   G. Explain how and why sound is used to study global ocean
temperatures. 
   H. Explain what sonar is and describe how humans use it. 

IX. Going to Extremes  
   A. Define primary production and compare and explain the patterns of
production in polar and tropical oceans.
   B. Explain the structure of coral animals and coral reefs and explain
why coral reefs are much more common on the western sides of oceans than
on the eastern sides.
   C. Define biodiversity; compare and contrast biodiversity in polar
oceans and on coral reefs.
   D. Compare and contracts the Arctic and Antarctic polar regions;
compare and contrast western tropical oceans and eastern tropical oceans.
   E. Explain the symbiotic relationship between zooxanthellae and the
coral polyps they inhabit.
   F. List and give examples of several ways of organisms cope with the
long dark session of polar oceans.
   G. Discuss several uses, abuses and problems specific to coral refs and
to polar ecosystems.

X. Something in the Air  
   A. Discuss the molecular composition of Earth’s lower atmosphere, the
fluctuating role of water vapor, and how all of this influences air’s
density.
   B. Describe the phenomenon of convection and how it affects the
movement of air over Earth’s surface.
   C. Explain the concept of Earth’s “climate system” as it relates
to the whole Earth system – ocean, atmosphere and land.
   D. Explain the basic sequence of events involved in Hurricane Mitch,
and why it is used as an example of how the power of Earth’s climate
system affects the human population.
   E. Explain the role of the sun’s energy in atmosphere circulation,
including the absorption/radiation/re-radiation concept and the varying
amounts of Earth’s heat budget involved.
   F. List and characterize the four major types of atmospheric convection
cells – Hadley, Ferrel, Polar and Walker.
   G. Explain the Coriolis affect and how it influences atmospheric
conditions.
   H. Describe the various common global wind and storm patterns – where
they form, their basic characteristics and how they are names.
   I. Define the concept of an air mass, how different air masses move and
behave, and how they interact at boundaries and fronts.

XI. Going with the Flow   
   A. List and briefly discuss the physical factors that cause surface
currents.
   B. Describe the characteristics and dynamics of the geostrophic gyre,
including the effects of wind, gravity and the ocean basin boundary.
   C. List and be able to locate on a map the six great currents of the
world oceans.
   D. Compare and contrast the characteristics of the eastern and western
boundary currents.
   E. Explain the mechanisms involved in the poleward transfer of water
and heat by surface currents.
   F. List and describe, briefly and in order, the events leading to an
ENSO event.
   G. Describe the La Niña phenomenon.
   H. Describe the Ekman transport mechanism.
   I. Discuss the Gulf Stream and the research done there.
   J. Discuss the difficulties involved in studying surface currents and
the technology now being used to overcome them.

XII. Deep Connections  
   A. Identify and characterize the basic (“named”) oceanic water
masses – three for the world ocean and additional two in temperate and
topical latitudes.
   B. Explain where, and under what conditions, the ocean’s water masses
are formed, how they retain a history of that information over time, and
how they eventually lose it.
   C. Describe the T-S (temperature/salinity) curve and how it is used to
explain the layering of oceanic waters.
   D. Discuss the Antarctic Bottom Water – its formation,
characteristics, migration and mixing patterns.
   E. Explain the basic thermohaline circulation patterns and mechanisms,
including what happens when different water masses encounter each other.
   F. Compare the slow-moving currents with faster-moving contour
currents, and tell how we know of the existence of the contour currents.
   G. Explain the roles played by both thermohaline flow and surface flow
in the global heat budget.
   H. Compare the two basic methods for studying ocean currents – flow
and float – and the types of devices used in each.
   I. List and briefly discuss chemical tracers as they are used in
studying currents.
   J. List and describe some of the satellite-involved technology used for
ocean curret studies. 

XIII. Surf’s Up
   A. Describe the formation and propagation of wind waves.
   B. Explain how waves are classified and named, based on the strength
and character of the forces that affect them.
   C. Describe the relationship between wave length and wave speed.
   D. Discuss the terminology used in describing wind waves and their
effects – size and shape, crest-and-trough, rogue waves, surf, sea and
period.
   E. List the chronological sequence of events that occur from the time a
deep-water wave begins to approach a shore until it breaks as surf.
   F. Identify some of the more notable historical events resulting from
the impacts of storm surge, secihes and tsunami, particularly the
locations, damage done and lives lost.
   G. Identify the various educational and warning programs now in place
to address tsunami and other large-wave threats.

XIV. Look Out Below
   A. Describe the three types of immense waves – storm surge, seiche
and tsunami – and the disturbing forces that cause them.
   B. Explain the sequence of events that can cause storm surge to form
from a hurricane or frontal storm, and the type of impact storm surge can
have as it comes ashore.
   C. Describe the transition of a shoreward-bound progressive wave in a
seiche, and its potential effect on the shores of enclosed or
semi-enclosed bodies of water.
   D. Discuss the uniqueness of the progressive wave called tsunami and
the types of distributing forces that can cause them.
   E. Compare the seismic sea wave – its formation, behavior and impact
on a shoreline.
   F. Compare the characteristics and behavior of tsunami generated by
volcanic activity, landslides and calving glaciers to seismic sea waves.
   G. Identify some of the more notable historical events resulting from
the impacts of storm surge, seiches and tsunami, particularly the
locations, damage done and lives lost.
   H. Identify the various educational and warning programs now in place
to address tsunami and other large-wave threats.
   I. Describe present concerns about rising sea levels and their
association with global warming, the disciplines in which research is
being done, and the technologies being used.

XV. Ebb and Flow  
   A. Recognize that the periodic rise and fall of sea-level, called
tides, has been recorded and studied since the early explorers and
coast-dwellers, particularly in the Middle East.
   B. Understand the characteristics of the true tidal wave and related
tidal phenomena, as compared to distributing force waves.
   C. Understand the contributions of Newton and Laplace in describing and
explaining the tidal phenomenon.
   D. Explain the roles of gravity and inertia as they affect the dynamics
of the sun/moon/Earth system.
   E. Explain the role of the gravitational attraction between two bodies
in the mechanics of the tide generating process.
   F. Compare and contrast Newton’s equilibrium model of the tidal
phenomenon with Laplace’s dynamic theory.
   G. Discuss the formation of the crest/trough configuration of the tidal
“wave”, the concept of tidal bulges, and how this explains the daily
high-tide/low-tide.
   H. Define the terms: low tide and high tide, neap tide and spring tide,
tidal datum and tidal range.
   I. Explain the interest in accurate tidal prediction and the methods
used to accomplish it.
   J. List the pros and cons of using the tides as a source of power.
   K. Characterize the basic intertidal zone that is inhabited by marine
organisms.

XVI. On the Coast
   A. Explain the basic concepts of the coast and coastline, as well as
the existing variety of descriptive subcategories under that general
terminology.
   B. Identify the various schemes and systems used for classifying
coasts, and the concepts upon which they are based.
   C. Discuss the terrestrial and marine processes that affect coasts, and
how and where they interact.
   D. Characterize the basic differences in appearance, structure and
dynamics between the three main U.S. coasts – Pacific, Atlantic, Gulf.
   E. Discuss the general concept of a beach (as opposed to other
shoreline structures), and understand the terminology used to describe the
various beach shapes, slopes, features and material compositions.
   F. Explain the formation of barrier spits, barrier islands, sea
islands, bay mouth bars and lagoons.
   G. Describe the unique physical features of estuaries, lagoons and
wetlands, and then compare and contrast their ecological significance.
   H. Describe the major points of controversy and discussion relating to
human interaction with natural coastlines, and some of the possible
management solutions and strategies.

XVII. Due West
   A. Characterize each of the four southern California study sites, in
terms of location, general physiography and geology.
   B. Describe and explain, for each case site, the human factors and
their potential impacts and effects, including urbanization, contamination
runoff and road-building.
   C. Discuss the plans of processes being used or considered to mitigate
the negative effects of human intervention for each case study.
   D. Understand the issues surrounding the concept of endangered species
at Point Mugu, and how this concern is being addressed.
   E. Explain the various natural factors involved in the landslides and
shoreline erosion activities in Malibu, including sea level changes, heavy
rains and mountain building.
   F. Describe the various levels of involvement of area residents,
regulatory agencies, politicians and scientists, in addressing the
problems and concerns of each location studied.

XVIII. Building Blocks
   A. Discuss the behavioral and natural systems of classification of
ocean life.
   B. Compare the six kingdoms of life.
   C. Discuss the physical limiting factors – light, temperature,
salinity, dissolved nutrients and gases, pH and hydrostatic pressure –
as they relate to marine life.
   D. Define osmosis and discuss its importance to life in the sea.
   E. Discuss the relationships between surface area and volume, gravity
and buoyancy, and viscosityand movement.
   F. Explain the importance of each to marinen life.
   G. Describe how the marine environment is classified on the basis of
light penetration and on the basis of location.

XIX. Water World
   A. Define life and discuss scientific hypotheses about how it might
have begun.
   B. Explain the relationships among matter, energy and life, and explain
how the second law of thermodynamics and entropy relate to life.
   C. Outline the biogeochemical cycles for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus
and iron, and compare and contrast these cycles.
   D. Outline the theory of evolution by natural selection and discuss its
importance in biology in general and biological oceanography in
particular.

XX. Food for Thought
   A. Define the term ‘primary production’, explain how it is measured
and describe its importance.
   B. Compare and contrast diatoms and dinoflagellates and discuss the
role of dinoflagellates in harmful algal blooms.
   C. Discuss the importance of the picoplankton.
   D. Discuss how light and nutrients interact to produce the general
seasonal patterns of primary production in tropical, temperate and polar
oceans and notable exceptions to theses patterns.
   E. Outline the major groups of macroalgae and angiosperms and discuss
their roles in marine primary production.

XXI. Survivors  
   A. Describe Earth’s earliest life forms and how they got their
energy.
   B. Describe the evolution of photosynthesis and how it led to the
oxygen revolution and the subsequent proliferation of animal forms of
life.
   C. Define the terms autotroph and heterotroph as they relate to the
oxygen revolution and the evolution of early animals.
   D. Define the term phylum as it is used to classify animals.
   E. Explain why the Burgess Shale is an important location for
discovering the evolutionary history of animals by studying their
fossils.
   F. Define the term invertebrate as it is used to describe groups of
aimals, both living and fossil.
   G. Discuss the eight invertebrate phyla presented, noting their basic
taxonomy, ecology and unique structural characteristics.
   H. Describe the two invertebrate chordate groups, their characteristics
and how they seem to make the transition between the true invertebrates and
the true vertebrates.
   I. Discuss the concept of the backbone and how it may be used
erroneously to separate more advanced from less advanced invertebrate
animals.
   J. Describe the intertidal zone of the marine environment, including
both rocky and sandy/muddy shores – what physical conditions prevail
there, and how the organisms that live there survive.

XXII. Life Goes On
   A. Describe the three features of the chordate body plan and contrast
the two groups of invertebrate chordates.
   B. List the animals in this lesson in order according to their
classification and understand both their common and scientific names.
   C. Describe the three classes of fishes.
   D. Describe the three major groups of marine reptiles.
   E. Outline the general characteristics of the class Aves and compare
the tubenose, gull, pelican and penguin groups.
   F. Discuss the general characteristics of the class Mammalia and
discuss four features shared by marine mammals.
   G. Describe the three orders of marine mammals and discuss the major
groups within each order.

XXIII. Living Together
   A. Define ecology and ecological community and relate the terms, niche,
habitat and biodiversity to the study of communities.
   B. Discuss the environmental tolerence curve concept and the
relationship between different curves to the abundance and distribution of
organisms in a community. 
   C. Compare intraspecific and interspecific competition and illustrate
how these regulate the distribution of Chthamalus and Balanus barncles in
the rocky intertidal community.  
   D. Discuss J-shaped and  S-shaped population growth curves including
how environmental resistance converts J-growth into S-growth and
establishes a carrying capacity.
   E. Distinguish between exploitative and interference competition and
give examples.
   F. Discuss symbiosis by comparing mutualism, commensalisms and
parasitism.  
   G. Compare the characteristics of any of the following communities with
any of the others: 
      1. Rocky intertidal
      2. Sandy intertidal
      3. Salt marsh/estuary
      4. Coral reef
      5. Pelagic photic zone
      6. Deep scattering layer (DSL)
      7. Bathpelagic zone
      8. Abyssal plains
      9. Hydrothermal vent/cold seep
     10. Whale fall

XXIV. Treasure Trove
   A. Distinguish among marine physical, biological, energy and
nonextractive resources and give several examples of each. 
   B. Describe the characteristics and extent of utilization of each
resource.
   C. Discuss fisheries and their management including the concepts of
common property, maximum sustainable yield, overfishing, the relationship
between effort and yield.
   D. Briefly discuss the history, regulation and future prospects of the
whaling industry.
   E. Outline and discuss the history and current status of the United
Nations International Law of the Sea Convention.

XXV. Dirty Water
   A. Explain the terminology used to define and discuss the human
activities that impact natural processes and ecosystems.
   B. Compare natural pollutants to human-generated pollutants.
   C. Discuss oil pollution – types of polluting agents, their sources,
and the habitats and organisms affected.
   D. Explain eutrophication, including the substances involved, their
sources, and how organisms and habitats are affected.
   E. Discuss pollution by heavy metals – types of metals involved and
their sources, organisms and habitats effected, short- and long-term
residual effects.
   F. Discuss the various types of synthetic products that can pose
environmental threats, particularly the organic chemicals and plastics;
their short- and long-term effects on ecosystems; and the concept of
biological amplification.
   G. Explain the potential environmental impact of sediments, from both
natural and human-related sources.
   H. Discuss sewage pollution – types, sources, potentially harmful
components, effects on organisms and ecosystems.
   I. Describe the environmental threats posed to marine ecosystems by
waste heat energy and by introduced species.
   J. Explain the concepts of environmental alteration at the global
level, especially ozone layer depletion, global warming/greenhouse effect,
nuclear energy/ionizing radiation, sea level rise.

XXVI. Hands On  
   A. Explain the general process of science in oceanography using at
least three examples from the course.
   B. Discuss the motivations, personal characteristics and training
needed to pursue a career in oceanography.
   C. Describe the purpose of major global oceanographic initiatives and
understand the importance of each to oceanography.
   D. Describe at least four areas of ongoing oceanic research and
understand their importance.
   E. Describe at least four scientific discoveries and describe why they
are important.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Instructor discretion – includes not only written assignment of a
research paper but also a collection of news articles from current print
media with accompanying written assessment of the articles. 0-25%

Completion of examinations containing both objective and short answer
questions that will be selected from material presented in the textbook
and the telecourse lessons. 75-100%

Evaluation Criteria for Writing: Complete, concrete, correct and clear
writing is a major goal of the writing assigned. Use required
documentation styles.

Grading Scale:
  A =  90% - 100%
  B =  80% -  89%
  C =  70% -  79% 
  D =  60% -  69% 
  F =   0% -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 125

  • Title: General Botany
  • Number: BIOL 125
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 7

Description:

This is a survey of the life, growth and structure of plants. Divisions of the plant kingdom will be presented with emphasis on life cycles, anatomy, physiology and ecology of major groups. Students will do microscopic and macroscopic analysis of the major division. 7 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and define as to function the parts of the plant cell and physiology of plant cells.
  2. List and compare the various plant phyla and place each plant in its proper division.
  3. Compare and contrast the various life cycles presented in class.
  4. Differentiate between photosynthesis and respiration and construct the steps in both processes.
  5. Identify parts of plants and list the differences between various tissues as to their function.List evolutionary tendencies of plants.
  6. Compare and contrast the various ecological areas (biomes) and their component parts.
  7. Write out a taxonomic key of plants used during taxonomy section.
  8. List the essential nutrients needed by plants and their deficiency symptoms.
  9. Trace the pathway of water in the plant.
  10. Describe the Transpiration-Pull Theory of water movement. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Plant Cell and Mitosis
   A. Describe the plant cell organelles and the functions of each.
   B List the stages of mitosis in order and describe each stage.
   C. Compare and contrast plant and animal cells.
   D. Define diffusion, osmosis and active transport.

II. Prokaryotes
   A. List the three bacterial types and general bacterial
characteristics.
   B. Compare and contrast prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
   C. List the characteristics of blue-green bacteria and compare with
bacteria.
   D. Name three genera of blue-green bacteria.

III. Euglenoids and Diatoms
   A. Describe Euglena anatomy and list the functions of each organelle.
   B. Describe Diatoms and their reproduction.
   C. Reproduce the Vaucheria life cycle.
   D. Compare and contrast asexual and sexual reproduction in diatoms.

IV. Chlorophyta
   A. Differentiate between six genera of green algae.
   B. Compare and contrast Spirogyr, Chlamydomonas and Fucus life cycles.
   C. Compare red and brown algae.
   D. List the number of species in each division.

V. Fungi
   A. List the characteristics of fungi.
   B. List the classification of fungi as to division and class.
   C. Describe lichens and differentiate between the three growth forms.
   D. List five economic uses of fungi.

VI. Bryophytes and Lower Vascular Plants
   A. Compare and contrast Marchantia and moss life cycles.
   B. Differentiate between bryophytes and moss life cycles.
   C. Compare Psilotophyta and Lycophyta.
   D. Describe the life cycle of Selanginella.

VII. Fern Allies and Gymnosperms
   A. Describe ferns and compare with Equisetum.
   B. Compare and contrast fern and pine life cycles.
   C. Differentiate seed plants from pteridophytes.
   D. List five economic uses of the Pinophyta.

VIII. Flowering Plants
   A. List all flower parts and describe their functions.
   B. Compare and contrast the various fruit types.
   C. Describe the life cycle of flowering plants.
   D. Compare and contrast Monocots and Dicots.

IX. Stems and Tissues
   A. Define the function of plant tissues.
   B. Describe the structure and function of stems.
   C. Compare woody and herbaceous dicots with monocot stems.
   D. List five examples of modified stems.

X. Roots and Leaves
   A. Describe root and leaf structure and function.
   B. Compare and contrast modified roots and leaves.
   C. Differentiate between tissues of roots and leaves.
   D. List five examples of specialized roots and leaves.

XI. Photosynthesis and Respiration
   A. Compare and list the differences between Light and Dark Reactions.
   B. List the steps in glycolysis and the Krebs cycle.
   C. Compare and contrast photosynthesis and respiration.
   D. Compare and contrast the ATP gain in aerobic and anaerobic
respiration.

XII. Transpiration and Water Movement
   A. Describe the cohesion-tension theory and phloem transport.
   B. Differentiate between macro and micro nutrients.
   C. Describe tropisms and plant hormone reactions.
   D. Define transpiration.

XIII. Ecology
   A. Draw and label a tropic level pyramid.
   B. Describe the various plant biomes.
   C. List and describe four recycled products.
   D. Describe succession on land and water.

XIV. Taxonomy
   A. Use a dichotomous key for plants.
   B. Compare monocots and dicots.
   C. List several families of both monocots and dicots.
   D. Differentiate between convergent and divergent evolution.

XV. Evolution
   A. Describe the theory of Natural Selection as proposed by Charles
Darwin.
   B. List the geologic periods and years in order.
   C. Define Endosymbiotic Hypotheses.
   D. Compare plants and animals as to the period in which they
flourished.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   Weekly Tests             56% of grade
   Lab Practicals           37% of grade
   Scientific Paper          7% of grade
     Total                 100%

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing
and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises
and projects.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 125H

  • Title: HON: General Botany*
  • Number: BIOL 125H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 127

  • Title: General Zoology
  • Number: BIOL 127
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 7

Description:

This is a survey of the life, structure, and growth of animals. Students will concentrate on identifying animals by their structural characteristics and looking at the role adaptation plays in anatomical and physiological features. Students will do dissections and microscopic analysis of the major phyla. 7 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. List and differentiate between the various Phyla and classes of organisms.
  2. Compare and contrast the various life cycles presented.
  3. Compare and contrast the various organs and systems of each group that are covered.
  4. Relate the dissections to the various groups studied.
  5. Differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  6. Differentiate between plant and animal cells.
  7. Compare and contrast protostomes and deuterostomes.
  8. Compare and contrast invertebrates and vertebrates.
  9. Describe cell physiology using diffusion, osmosis and active transport.
  10. Differentiate between the stages of mitosis and list them in order.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Cells and Mitosis
   A. Describe the structure and functions of the cell organelles
   B. List in order the stages of mitosis and the characteristics of each
stage
   C. Compare animal and plant cells
   D. Define diffusion, osmosis, and active transport

II. Architectural Patterns of Animals
   A. List and describe the stages of development from zygote to gastrula
   B. List in order the levels of organization from cell to biosphere
   C. Compare and contrast Protstomes and Deuterostomes
   D. List the seven ranks used in classification

III. Protozoa
   A. List the characteristics of protozoans
   B. Name the various phyla and give examples of each
   C. Compare and contrast the modes of locomotion
   D. List the seven ranks used in classification

IV. Porifera
   A. List the characteristics and contributions of proifera
   B. List the classes and their representatives
   C. Compare and contrast the modes of locomotion
   D. Describe the functions of the organelles used by protozoans

V. Cnidaria
   A. List the characteristics and contributions of cnidarians
   B. Name the classes and their representatives
   C. Compare polyp and medusa stages
   D. Describe the various cell types
 
VI. Platyhelminthes
   A. List the characteristics and contributions of flatworms
   B. Names the classes and their representatives
   C. Compare and contrast fluke and tapeworm life cycles
   D. Differentiate between free?living and parasitic forms

VII. Nematodes and Rotifers and Gastrotrichs
   A. List the characteristics of pseudocoelomates
   B. Name the phyla presented and list their representatives
   C. Compare and contrast the various nematode life cycles
   D. Define parthenogenesis and cell constancy   

VIII. Mollusca
   A. List the characteristics and contributions of mollusks
   B. Name the phyla presented and list their representatives
   C. Compare gastropods, bivalves and cephalopods
   D. Differentiate between torsion and coiling

IX. Annelida
   A. List the characteristics and contributions of annelids
   B. List the classes and their representatives
   C. Compare and contrast the three classes
   D. Describe earthworm reproduction

X. Arthropoda
   A. List the characteristics and contributions of arthropods
   B. List the representatives and their subphyla and classes
   C. Compare and contrast the various groups
   D. Differentiate between the three types of metamorphosis

XI. Chordata (Fish)
   A. List the characteristics and contributions of chordates
   B. List the subphyla and classes and their representatives
   C. Compare and contrast the various fish classes
   D. Differentiate between the types of scales

XII. Echinodermata
   A. List the characteristics and contributions of echinoderms
   B. Name the classes and their representatives
   C. Differentiate between the parts of the water vascular system
   D. Compare and contrast each system

XIII. Amphibias
   A. List and describe the various characteristics of amphibians
   B. Name the orders and their representatives
   C. Draw the frog life cycle and use time frames
   D. Describe the various chromatophores

XIV. Reptilia
   A. Describe and list the characteristics of reptiles
   B. List the orders and their representatives
   C. Compare and contrast the various orders
   D. List three ways the order crocodilia is unique

XV. Aves
   A. Describe and list the characteristics of birds
   B. List the parts of the feather
   C. Compare precocial and altricial birds
   D. Compare and contrast ratite and carinate birds

XVI. Mammalia
   A. Describe and list the characteristics of mammals
   B. List the orders and their representatives
   C. Compare reproduction in Monotremes, Marsupials and other mammals
   D. Differentiate between horns and antlers

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   Grading:
      Weekly Test         61% of grade
      Lab Practicals      39% of grade
                         100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 130

  • Title: Environmental Science
  • Number: BIOL 130
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Environmental Science seeks to describe problems and solutions associated with human use of natural resources. Students will study the major physical and biological processes that govern the complex interactions in natural ecosystems. Major course topics include human population growth, resource use and pollution. Practical solutions aimed at sustainability will be identified and examined. This is an introductory, nonscience-major survey course. 3 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. List the major environmental problems.

  2. Explain basic science principles which relate to environmental problem solving.

  3. Describe past and present human population growth in terms of growth curves and demography.

  4. Identify factors which influence population growth.

  5. Describe the resources available on the surface of the earth and the alternative ways of using them.

  6. Describe the types and causes of pollution.

  7. List the components of a sustainable future.

  8. List solutions to pollution problems under the headings of legal, technological and individual behavioral changes.

  9. Describe the impacts of differing ethical economic and political viewpoints on environmental problem solving. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction and Historical Concerns
   A. Define environmental science.
   B. Trace the development of attitudes toward natural resources in the United States.
   C. Describe conflicting world views.
   D. Describe the interactions among human population growth, resource use and pollution.

II. Principles of Science
   A. List the ecological levels of the hierarchy of matter.
   B. List and describe the five physical characteristics of the biosphere which allow life to exist on Earth.
   C. Describe the biomes east and west of Kansas City with respect to limiting factors and vegetation.
   D. List the biotic and abiotic components of an ecosystem.
   E. Compare and contrast photosynthesis and cell respiration.
   F. State the Principle of Competitive Exclusion and the Law of Tolerances.
   G. State the Law of Conservation of Matter and the two Laws of Thermodynamics.
   H. Describe the application of the Law of Conservation of Matter and the two Laws of Thermodynamics to ecosystems.
   I. Describe factors which lead to ecosystem stability.
   J. Describe nutrient cycling and the specific of two cycles.

III. Human Population
   A. Define demography and demographic factors including crude birth rate, crude death rate, doubling time, natural rate of increase/decrease, total fertility rate, replacement fertility rate, population profiles, marriage age, infant mortality rate, literacy, population density and
GNP/capita.
   B. Given the crude birth and death rates of a country, calculate the natural rate of increase/decrease as a percent and the doubling time in years.
   C. List demographic factors which are used to judge quality of life in different countries.
   D. Describe what the different demographic factors tell about a population.
   E. Compare and contrast demographic factors between less developed countries and more developed countries.
   F. Describe the historical growth of the world’s human population.
   G. Contrast historical and future human population growth between more developed countries and less developed countries.
   H. List arguments in favor of and against controlling human population growth.
   I. Describe the four stages of a demographic transition.
   J. Describe the influence of the availability of family planning on human population growth.
   K. Describe factors which are effective in reducing fertility.

IV. Resources
   A. Water Resources
      1. Describe the hydrologic or water cycle.
      2. Describe the local water cycle in Johnson County, Kansas.
      3. Describe the general drinking water treatment process including coagulation and sedimentation, filtration and disinfection.
      4. List 5-10 ways to personally use less water.
      5. Describe concerns about the overuse of ground water and surface water.
   B. Soil, Agriculture and Pesticides
      1. Briefly trace the development of agriculture.
      2. Compare and contrast agribusiness, subsistence farming and sustainable agriculture.
      3. Describe the concerns of animal farming.
      4. List methods to increase food production.
      5. List and describe five physical characteristics of soil.
      6. Describe methods of controlling soil erosion.
      7. Describe federal policies aimed at managing United States agriculture.
   C. Energy
      1. Trace the history of energy use in the United States.
      2. List five sources used in the United Stated and give the percent of the current energy.
      3. Connect sources of energy in the United States to end uses.
      4. List and describe possible energy futures for the United States including fossil fuels, conservation, nuclear and nonrenewables.
   D. Biological Diversity
      1. List the benefits of species diversity.
      2. List factors causing species decline.
      3. Describe methods to protect and conserve species.
   E. Minerals
      1. Describe the environmental impact of mining and processing minerals.
      2. Draw a depletion curve for a non-renewable resource and describe how to extend the curve.
      3. Describe the United States’ situation with respect to mineral supply.
      4. List minerals found in Kansas.
   F. Public Lands
      1. State the amount and location of public lands in the United States.
      2. Describe current management philosophies and practices with respect to public lands.
      3. Describe ecosystems as natural resources and as natural capital.
      4. Describe areas of concern in the national parks, wilderness areas, wildlife refuges, national forests and Bureau of Land Management areas.
      5. Describe land use planning and relate it to local cities.
      6. Describe the cycle of decay in a city.
      7. List characteristics of a sustainable city.

V. Pollution
   A. Describe attitudes toward pollution in the United States.
   B. Contrast pollution control with pollution prevention.
      1. Water
         a. Describe the process of eutrophication.
         b. List long-term strategies to combat eutrophication.
         c. Describe the wastewater treatment process, specifically which processes remove which pollutants.
         d. List major federal laws related to water pollution.
      2. Air
         a. List and give the sources of primary and secondary air pollutants.
         b. List the general impacts of air pollution.
         c. Describe the major components and impact of the Clear Air Act of 1970 and Amendments of 1977 an 1990.
         d. Give examples of control strategies to reduce air pollution.
         e. Describe the problem, cause, impact and possible solutions for acid deposition, global climate change or ozone depletion.
      3. Hazardous Chemicals
         a. Define and give examples of hazardous materials.
         b. List the major sources of hazardous materials.
         c. List the results of mismanagement of hazardous materials.
         d. State the major goal with respect to hazardous chemicals of the following federal laws:
            1. Superfund - 1980
            2. Resources Conservation and Recovery Act - 1976
            3. Underground Storage Tank
            4. DOT Regulations
            5. “Right-To-Know”
            6. Toxic Substances Control Act
      4. Municipal Solid Waste
         a. List and describe methods of disposal used in the United States.
         b. List the components of Municipal Solid Waste.

VI. Society
   A. Describe the public policy life cycle using an environmental example.
   B. Contrast pollution control using a market vs. a regulatory approach.
   C. Briefly describe cost-benefit analysis.
   D. List the four steps in risk analysis.
   E. Describe components of an environmental ethic.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests over lecture, reading material, films, discussions, etc. =
70-90% of grade

Discussions, assignments, quizzes, and in-class projects  = 10-30% of
grade

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 130H

  • Title: HON: Environmental Science*
  • Number: BIOL 130H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 131

  • Title: Environmental Science Lab*
  • Number: BIOL 131
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: BIOL 130.

Description:

In this lab, students will learn ecological principles that are necessary for understanding and solving environmental problems. Students will sample the local environment for various types of environmental pollution, conduct lab projects and computer simulations, and attend field trips. Field trips may include a visit to a local wastewater treatment plant, a stream ecosystem and a prairie ecosystem. 2 hrs.lab/wk. plus up to three field trips. BIOL 131 students must be currently enrolled in BIOL 130 or have successfully completed BIOL 130 within the last three years.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the scientific method and be able to write a paper in scientific format.
  2. Collect, analyze and interpret data.
  3. Follow standard lab safety practices.
  4. Correctly follow procedures to operate equipment used in laboratory experiments.
  5. Analyze resources such as soil and water to determine their quality.
  6. Describe the operation of a water treatment and/or wastewater treatment plant.
  7. List and describe the ecosystems in the local area.
  8. Conduct laboratory activities which illustrate specific ecological principles.
  9. Describe the impact of human consumer decisions and human population growth on the environment.
  10. Use the computer to run environmental simulations, graph data and conduct an Internet search. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Resources
   A. Soil
      1. Describe a soil sample with respect to color, texture, structure,
depth and permeability.
      2. Relate soil characteristics to specific land uses.
   B. Water
      1. Sample an aquatic environment with respect to specific
characteristics and determine water quality.
      2. Compare two or more aquatic environments.
   C. Energy
      1. Describe home energy conservation practices.
      2. Use a computer simulation to evaluate energy use in a home.

II. Water Pollution
   A. Describe the processes in a water treatment plant and/or a
wastewater treatment plant.
   B. Sample ambient air for specific pollutants.
   C. Construct a miniature sanitary landfill and analyze decomposition.

III. Scientific Principles
   A.  Write a report in scientific format.
   B.  Ecology
      1. Describe a local ecosystem with respect to major life forms and
physical characteristics.
      2. Construct and use a dichotomous key.
      3. Relate the information obtained from a tree core to the actual
environment of the tree.
      4. Conduct a vegetational analysis in a local forest to determine
density and dominance.
      5. Analyze a microcosm with respect to physical and biological
changes.
      6. Conduct an experiment to determine abiotic/biotic influences on
an organism.
      7. Gather data and graph a species area curve for a local
environment.
      8. Describe procedures to estimate populations.

IV. Human Ecology
   A. List examples of consumer decisions and describe their impact on the
environment.
   B. Compare and contrast human demographics for different world
regions.

V. Computer Activities
   A. Run a computer simulation.
   B. Construct a line graph using computer software.
   C. Conduct an Internet search.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Lab reports, papers, homework, quizzes, participation = 15-40% of
grade

Exams = 60-85% of grade

Total = 100%

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing
and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises
and projects.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need transportation to field trip sites.
  2. Any student dropping BIOL 130 (Environmental Science Lecture) will also be dropped from BIOL 131 (Environmental Science Laboratory)
  3. Safety Statement: Students enrolling in a laboratory course should be aware that they will be working with a variety of chemicals and scientific materials. Individuals are expected to practice safe techniques with all equipment and materials used in the laboratory. Students are responsible for their own health and safety. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 132

  • Title: Introduction to Public Health
  • Number: BIOL 132
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This is an introductory course in public health. It provides a background in many areas of public health with an emphasis on the health system and understanding and measuring health, disease and illness. Epidemiology, food safety and animal health will also be examined. Public health emergency preparedness, the public health workforce and public health administration will also be studied. Students will learn about public health nursing, public health education and the role of law and government in public health. Students will also examine environmental and occupational health. The different types of public health professional occupations and future challenges for public health will be examined. 3 hrs lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe eras in the historical development of public health and ways that public health affects literature and the arts, current events, and everyone's daily life.
  2. Illustrate public health's interdisciplinary, cross-cutting character and the contributions of different disciplines and professions to improving health.
  3. Explain how practitioners design and implement culturally competent interventions for improving health in diverse populations.
  4. Explain how culturally competent health information and culturally competent communications can be used to improve health in diverse populations.
  5. Describe how social and behavioral interventions affect population health.
  6. Analyze epidemiological data by applying the basic principles of epidemiology, including rates, risk factors, disease determinants, causation, and public health surveillance.
  7. Describe the impact of the environment and describe how communicable diseases, including animal and food-borne diseases, affect health.
  8. Explain the burden of infectious and chronic diseases and injuries on morbidity and mortality and describe approaches to early detection and prevention.
  9. Describe the role of nutrition and physical activity in health and illness.
  10. Explain how government, policy and law affect public health.
  11. Describe the basic organization of health care and public health systems and the contributions of health professionals.
  12. Explain criteria for evaluating health systems, including matters of equitable access to care, quality, and cost.
  13. Describe the roles of public health in addressing health disparities and the needs of vulnerable populations.
  14. Describe the roles of public health in natural or terrorism-related disaster prevention and management.
  15. Describe the public health professional occupations including public health nursing, and the composition of the public health workforce.
  16. Describe the global problems and solutions in international public health.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Overview and Basic Principles
   A. Describe the context and scope of public health, including history,
philosophy, literature, essential services, ethics, and applications to
current events.
      1. Review public health in historical and modern perspectives.
   B. Identify public health as a system.
      1. Explain the features of public health
      2. Review the definitions of public health
   C. Describe the role of the Public Health Workforce.

II. Epidemiologic principles. 
   A. Describe rates, risk factors, and health status indicators of
morbidity and mortality.
      1. Identify disease determinants and causation
      2. Describe the types of epidemiologic research. 
   B. Describe public health surveillance and vital statistics.
      1. Analyze and interpret epidemiological data and statistics.
      2. Identify population groups that experience health disparities
using epidemiological data and statistics.

III. Population Health Tools
   A. Describe health communication and informatics
      1. Access and evaluate the quality of health information and data in
the mass media.
      2. Describe the importance of culturally competent health
information
      3. Explain how culturally competent educational interventions are
designed for specific target populations.
      4. Explain how culturally competent educational interventions
improve health outcomes, including populations that experience health
disparities.
   B. Describe health and social and behavioral sciences.
      1. Explain the impact of diversity, ethnicity, culture and heritage
on health and illness.
      2. Explain the impact of social and behavioral health on health and
illness.
      3. Explain the impact of nutrition on health and illness.
      4. Describe the role of physical activity in maintaining health and
wellness.
      5. Identify educational interventions that target nutrition and
physical exercise as key components of health and wellness.
      6. Identify methods for altering behaviors at the individual and
population levels.
   C. Review Health policy, law, and ethics.
      1. Describe the tools for implementing health decisions.
      2. Identify the potential tensions between individual rights and
social responsibilities.
      3. Review the role of government and law in design and
implementation of public health policy.

IV. Disease and Disability: Determinants, Burdens and Interventions
   A. Review the role of environmental health and safety in public
health.
      1. Describe the environmental issues in public health including
chemicals and pesticides, air and water pollutants, and solid and
hazardous wastes.
      2. Describe the impact of food and drug safety on public health.
      3. Describe the impact of population growth and climate change on
public health.
   B. Review the role of infectious diseases in public health.
      1. Recognize the effects of infectious diseases on longevity and
quality of life.
      2. Explain the demographic distribution and epidemiology of
infectious diseases.
      3. Identify methods of prevention, detection, and control of
infectious diseases from a population perspective.
      4. Identify population groups that experience disparities in
infectious disease prevention.
   C. Review the role of chronic diseases in public health.
      1. Recognize the effects of chronic diseases on longevity and
quality of life.
      2. Explain the demographic distribution and epidemiology of chronic
diseases.
      3. Identify methods to prevent, detect, treat, and minimize the
impact of chronic diseases.
      4. Identify population groups that experience disparities in chronic
disease prevention and detection.
 
V. Healthcare and public health systems
   A. Describe the composition of the public health workforce.
      1. Explain the size and distribution of the public health
workforce.
      2. Explain the roles of public health workers.
      3. Describe the diverse nature of public health disciplines.
      4. Review the interdisciplinary nature of public health
professionals.
      5. Describe the employment options within the healthcare and public
health workforce.
   B. Review the organization of healthcare and public health systems
      1. Explain the institutions and structures of healthcare and public
health systems.
      2. Review the major national and international public health
infrastructures.
      3. Describe the roles and complementary responsibilities of
healthcare and public health systems.
      4. Explain the mechanisms, including insurance systems, for paying
for healthcare services.
   C. Identify the costs, quality, and access to healthcare and public
health services.
      1. Review the reasons for healthcare costs.
      2. Explain the criteria for healthcare quality. 
      3. Describe the effects of inadequate access to quality healthcare.
      4. Identify population groups that experience disparities in
healthcare access.
   D. Describe public health preparedness and disaster management
      1. Identify the essential roles of public health in preparedness for
and response to natural or terrorism-related disasters
      2. Explain the bioterrorism threats to public health including
infectious diseases, threats to air and water quality and to the nation's
food supply.

VI. Special Public Health Education Focus Areas
   A. Describe health disparities and vulnerable populations
      1. Review public health's commitment to vulnerable populations.
      2. Identify specific health care areas of disparity including
maternal and child care, aging, persons with disabilities and minority
groups.
      3. Explain the impact of socioeconomically disadvantaged populations
on healthcare.
      4. Describe the role of cultural competence in designing health
education interventions for vulnerable populations.
   B. Review the role of public health in global health
      1. Describe the burden and distribution of disease on an
international level
      2. Identify the effects of globalization on public health
      3. Identify cross-national collaborations to find solutions for
global public health concerns.
      4. Identify population groups that experience disparities in health
globally.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be
accomplished using the following methods: There will be a minimum of three
examinations and a final examination. Material for examinations may be
taken from the lectures, textbook, handouts, and other assignments such as
discussion board questions and homework. In addition, there will be at
least one project/presentation. Examinations 65 – 70%. Homework and
other assignments 30 – 35%.
 
Grading Scale:
  A =  90% - 100%
  B =  80% -  89%
  C =  70% -  79% 
  D =  60% -  69% 
  F =   0% -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 132H

No information found.

BIOL 134

  • Title: Principles of Sustainability
  • Number: BIOL 134
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Principles of Sustainability introduces students to the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability and sustainable development. The course will critically examine the use of sustainable principles to guide decision making and problem solving in personal, campus, community and global contexts. Students will engage in a variety of individual, group, campus and community activities and collaborate with campus and community offices and agencies in order to identify, assess and address local sustainability needs. Students will be required to present their projects at a public sustainability forum. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Examine sustainability from a multidisciplinary perspective and the vocabulary associated with informed discussions of sustainability issues and solutions.
  2. Define systems thinking and apply that approach to issues in sustainability.
  3. Identify, diagram and describe systems in terms of their ecological, social and economic dimensions.
  4. Discuss key figures, tests, events and laws associated with the environmental movement at the local, state, and national and international levels.
  5. Identify a local sustainability issue, research and assess the problem, including its inherent political, economic, ecological and social components.
  6. Participate in a local on-going sustainability initiative or develop new initiatives.
  7. Collaborate with other students and members of the community in order to propose solutions for a more sustainable world. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Definitions and Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Sustainability
   A. Review definitions of sustainability from multiple disciplines.
   B. Examine definitions to find common themes and relevant
distinctions.
   C. Define social, ecological, and economic systems, and provide
examples of each.
   D. Define "systems thinking" and use models of simple systems to
understand the complexities and requirements necessary for sustainable
problem solving.

II. Sustainability and Environment
   A. Define ecological footprint.
   B. Describe economic, social and ecological health.
   C. Review research methods for assessing the impact of human activity
on the environment.
   D. Identify and discuss key sustainability issues associated with
environmental health, transportation, energy production, food production
and distribution, architecture, resource management, recreation, and
consumer choices.
   E. Describe scenarios in which human activity depletes the ability of a
system to remain sustainable.
   F. Define Biomimicry and describe scenarios in which biological systems
may be used to model sustainable practice.

III. Sustainability and the Economy
   A. Examine lifestyles and discuss the ecological, economic and social
requirements necessary to support the lifestyles considered.
   B. Identify the natural resource requirements needed to maintain a
local for-profit business or company.
   C. Assess the environmental, economic and social costs associated with
the acquisition and use of those resources.
   D. Explore methods for incentivizing and reducing the environmental
impact of a company while enabling the company to remain viable.
   E. Define the "greening" of a company and "green-washing" and the
economic impacts of both.
   F. Identify a local business which has considerably reduced its
eco-footprint.
   G. Discuss the environmental ethics issue involved in various consumer
behaviors.

IV. Sustainability and Society
   A. Identify key people, policies, laws and perspectives relevant to the
environmental movement.
   B. Discuss the history of Earth Day.
   C. Explain the Environmental Protection Agency, its mission and
responsibilities.
   D. Identify and characterize social classes in the United States.
   E. Describe the income distribution in the United States and another
culture.
   F. List major ethnic groups in the United States.
   G. Research and map the geographical distribution of various social
classes, economic and ethnic groups in a definite area of the United
States, such as a city or county and compare to another culture.
   H. Identify biohazards, landfills, major industries, agricultural
enterprises, highways, railroad installations, mining and other activities
which involve intense acquisition and use of natural resources within a
particular U.S. geographical boundary.
   I. Discuss and/or investigate the possible health impacts that resource
use has on a specific social, ethnic or economic class.
   J. Define environmental justice.
   K. Identify and discuss policies and laws that seek to ameliorate
environmental injustice.
   L. Define food security and food sovereignty in terms of the poorest of
U.S. citizens.
   M. Identify and describe Native American or sustainable practices used
by other indigenous groups that promote and maintain a sustainable
environment.
   N. Define Biopiracy and the relevant legal and ethical concerns.
   O. Distinguish among environmental science, environmental activism and
environmental extremism.

V. Sustainability and the Planet
   A. Discuss global environmental issues such as climate change, resource
scarcity, pollution and biodiversity preservation.
   B. Identify competing views associated with the issue of climate change
and other global issues.
   C. Discuss the United Nations and International efforts to help sustain
human populations while protecting environmental systems.
   D. Identify and discuss international treaties associated with the
protection of the environment.
   E. Discuss and locate particularly challenging environmental issues
that have a global economic impact.

VI. Sustainability and Problem Solving
   A. Identify an on-going, non-profit local effort to increase
sustainability, a local or campus-related environmental/sustainability
issue that needs assistance or remediation, a business that is
implementing sustainability practices, or a current legislative or
political campaign that involves sustainability.
   B. Identify a specific, focused problem relevant to sustainability
within this local effort, issue, company, or campaign.
   C. Assess the identified problem using research methods.
   D. Design a solution to the problem, accounting for the economic,
social and environmental impacts involved, after consulting with all
interested stake-holders.
   E. Collaborate with other students and members of the community to
implement sustainable solutions.
   F. Present the sustainability project to the class and in public
sustainability forum.

VII. Research and Writing on Sustainability
   A. Develop a bibliography of articles and books relevant to the topic
of sustainability.
   B. Maintain a personal reading and activity journal.
   C. Create a portfolio of projects and presentations on various issues
related to sustainability.
   D. Compose a personal definition of sustainability and list of personal
sustainability objectives.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-40% Exams
10-20% Personal Reflective Journal and Writing Assignments
20-30% Research Project and Presentation
10-30% Research Paper or Community Service Project

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to off campus sites. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 135

  • Title: Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Number: BIOL 135
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This is an integrated lecture and laboratory course for biology majors and students planning to take additional courses in biology. Subjects covered include basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, cellular metabolism, Mendelian and molecular genetics, natural selection and evolution, cell physiology, and development of plants and animals from the single-celled stage to the embryonic stage. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe basic biochemical molecules.
  2. Identify cellular structures and know their functions.
  3. Describe the basic principles of cellular metabolism.
  4. Identify and explain the forms and processes of cell division.
  5. Identify the basic principles of Mendelian and molecular genetics, and relate these theories to natural selection and evolution.
  6. Explain the basic principles of cellular physiology.
  7. Apply the scientific method in a laboratory setting.
  8. Correctly use scientific equipment. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Biochemical Molecules

A. Distinguish between atoms and elements and list the six elements that compose over 90% of living matter.

B. Name the subatomic particles and relate the atom’s structure to its chemical properties.

C. Describe electron orbital configuration and how it affects an element’s reactivity.

D. Name the three types of chemical bonds and how each are formed.

E. Describe the mechanism of enzymes as catalysts in chemical reactions.

F. Identify the four major groups of organic molecules and describe their functions.

II. The Cellular Structures and Their Functions

A. Describe the cell theory.

B. Differentiate between prokaryotic cells, eukaryotic cells and viruses.

C. Describe the advantages of specialization in eukaryotic cells.

D. Describe structure and function of a cell wall, plasma membrane and cytoskeleton.

E. Name and explain the functions of organelles comprising eukaryotic cells.

F. Describe the fluid mosaic model.

III. The Basic Principles of Cellular Metabolism

A. Define energy and the laws of thermodynamics.

B. Explain the role of ATP as an energy coupler.

C. Outline the generalized formula for photosynthesis.

D. Describe the light-dependent and light-independent pathways of photosynthesis.

E. Relate the structure and function of a chloroplast.

F. Outline the generalized formula for aerobic respiration.

G. Describe glycolysis, Kreb’s cycle and the electron transport chain.

H. Relate the structure and function of a mitochondrion.

I. Compare aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

IV. The Forms of Cell Division

A. Describe binary fission.

B. List the stages of the cell cycle.

C. Describe the phase of mitosis and meiosis.

D. Compare the results of mitosis and meiosis.

E. Differentiate between nuclear division and cytokinesis.

F. Distinguish between asexual and sexual reproduction.

G. Describe reproduction and development in plants and animals.

V. The Basic Principles of Mendelian and Molecular Genetics

A. Explain the Mendelian principles of heredity.

B. Relate the steps of meiosis to the Mendelian principles of heredity.

C. Describe inheritance patterns including dominance, incomplete dominance, codominance, epistasis and pleiotropy.

D. Outline the steps in DNA replication.

E. Describe transcription and translation.

F. Describe the mechanisms that cause mutations.

G. Explain how genes are regulated in eukaryotes and prokaryotes.

H. Explain the mechanisms of natural selection and how new species are formed.

I. Identify the methods utilized in genetic engineering.

VI. The Basic Principles of Cellular Physiology

A. List three types of neurons and their impulse pathways.

B. Explain how a neural impulse is generated and conducted.

C. Identify glands of the human endocrine system.

D. List examples of hormones produced by glands.

E. Explain how hormones travel through a human body and how they are recognized by target cells.

F. Explain the sliding filament theory of muscular contraction.

G. Describe the structure, and explain the functions of antibodies.

H. Describe how B- and T-lymphocytes function in the specific immune response.

I. Describe the cohesion-tension theory and pressure-flow hypothesis for plants.

VII. Apply the Scientific Method in a Laboratory Setting

A. Construct testable hypotheses.

B. Perform experiments.

C. Analyze experimental results.

VIII. Demonstration of the Proper Use of Scientific Equipment

A. Use microscopes.

B. Make wet mounts for use in microscopes studies.

C. Make measurements using the metric system.

D. Use computer software simulation program.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

75%    Tests from lectures and labs
25%    Homework from lectures and labs

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

Grade will be based on a percentage of the 850 total points as follows:
90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 135H

  • Title: HON: Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology*
  • Number: BIOL 135H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 140

  • Title: Human Anatomy
  • Number: BIOL 140
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Students will study gross and microscopic aspects of cells, tissues and organ systems of the human body. They will concentrate on a detailed analysis of the structure of each body system. Integrated lecture and lab, 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize, histologically, from a drawing, photomicrograph or by microscopic examination, the tissues of the human body.
  2. Describe, either orally or on a written examination, the general architecture of each of the body's systems.
  3. Identify, on a complete skeleton, each of the bones and selected bone markings of the human body.
  4. Identify the major muscles of the body and give their actions.
  5. Identify, on a model or preserved specimen, specific structures found in a particular body system.
  6. Explain, either orally or on a written examination, the functional interrelationships between each of the systems that comprise body regions.
  7. Correlate, either orally or on a written examination, the anatomical basis of selected, clinically relevant dysfunctions.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Orientation to Human Anatomy
  A. List the levels of organization, giving examples of each. 
  B. Discuss anatomical terminology. 
     1. Explain the origins of our present day terminology. 
     2. Describe the process of word analysis, define and give examples 
        of combining terms, prefixes and suffixes. 
  C. Identify the planes of reference and descriptive terms for body positions. 
  D. Outline the body cavities and describe their contents and membranes. 

II. The Body’s Microscopic Organization 
  A. Cytology 
     1. Relate the cell theory. 
     2. Recognize parts of the typical cell and describe their functions. 
     3. Define the cell cycle. 
        a. State the significance of the cell cycle. 
        b. List the stages of mitosis and give their distinguishing characteristics. 
  B. Histology 
     1. Classify tissues and list their functions. 
     2. Describe epithelial tissues. 
        a. Classify types of epithelia. 
        b. Describe types of membranes. 
        c. List the types of glands. 
     3. Describe connective tissues and their functions. 
        a. Define the types of connective tissue propers. 
        b. Describe the supporting connective tissues. 
        c. Describe the specialized connective tissue and blood. 
     4. Describe muscular tissues. 
     5. Describe nervous tissues. 
     6. Recognize neurons and their parts. 
     7. List the neuroglia and their functions. 

III. Protection, Support and Movement 
  A. The integumentary system 
     1. List the functions of the integumentary system. 
     2. Identify the layers and their histology. 
     3. Discuss derivatives of the epidermis. 
  B. The skeletal system 
     1. List the functions of the skeletal system. 
     2. Describe bone structure. 
        a. Classify bones into types based on their structure. 
        b. Define the major surface bone markings. 
        c. Identify the structures of a longitudinal section of a long bone. 
     3. Distinguish between the two types of bone growth. 
        a. Discuss endochondral ossification. 
        b. Discuss intramembranous ossification. 
     4. Define the axial skeleton. 
        a. Identify the elements of the skull and the major surface features of each. 
        b. Classify the vertebrae by their regional characteristics.   
        c. Identify the elements of the vertebral column and the major features of each. 
        d. Identify the elements of the rib cage and their major surface features. 
        e. Classify the articulated ribs as true, false or floating.  
     5. Define the appendicular skeleton. 
        a. Compare and contrast the pectoral and pelvic girdles. 
          1) Identify the elements of the pectoral girdle and the major surface features of each. 
          2) Identify the elements of the pelvic girdle and the major surface features of each. 
        b. Compare and contrast the upper and lower extremities. 
          1) Identify the elements of the upper extremity and the major surface features of each.
          2) Identify the elements of the lower extremity and the major surface features of each.
  C. Articulations
     1. Discuss the classification of joints. 
        a. Explain the structural categories of joints. 
        b. Explain the functional categories of joints. 
     2. Identify and describe examples of synarthroses. 
     3. Identify and describe examples of amphiarthroses. 
     4. Identify and describe examples of diarthroses. 
        a. Discuss characteristics of synovial joints. 
        b. List and discuss the six types of synovial joints. 
        c. Define the various types of movements that occur at synovial joints. 
  D. The muscular system 
     1. Describe fascial elements. 
     2. List the functions and general properties of muscle tissue.   
     3. Describe the structure of skeletal muscles. 
     4. Discuss the components and functions of a neuromuscular junction. 
     5. Explain the various bases for naming muscles. 
     6. Recognize the major muscles of the head and neck. 
     7. Recognize the major muscles of the body wall. 
     8. Recognize the major muscles of the upper extremity.  
     9. Recognize the major muscles of the lower extremity. 

IV. Integration and Coordination 
  A. Organization of the nervous system 
     1. Explain the major anatomical and functional divisions of the nervous system. 
     2. Identify the primary components of the central nervous system. 
     3. Identify the primary components of the peripheral nervous system. 
     4. Identify the primary components of the autonomic nervous system. 
  B. Histology of the nervous system. 
     1. Describe the principal structures and functions of neurons. 
        a. Classify the various types of neurons structurally. 
        b. Classify the various types of neurons functionally.  
     2. Identify and discuss the functions and locations of the various types of neuroglia.
  C. The central nervous system 
     1. Discuss the structures and functions of the spinal cord. 
        a. Identify the major structures of the spinal cord. 
        b. Identify and explain the major ascending and descending pathways. 
     2. Discuss the structures and functions of the brain. 
        a. Explain the principal structures of the brain to their general functions. 
        b. Relate the principal structures of the brain to their general functions. 
           1) List the functions of the telencephalon. 
           2) List the functions of the diencephalons. 
           3) List the functions of the mesencephalon. 
           4) List the functions of the metencephalon. 
           5) List the functions of the myelencephalon. 
        c. Explain the role of the meninges in protecting the central nervous system. 
           1) Describe the general structure of the meningeal layers. 
           2) Identify each of the major dural reflections around the brain. 
        d. Discuss cerebrospinal fluid in relation to the ventricles of the brain and the        subarachnoid space. 
           1) Describe the processes and structure involved in the formation of cerebrospinal fluid. 
           2) Trace the circulation of cerebrospinal fluid within the central nervous system. 
  D. Special senses 
     1. Examine the general anatomical structures involved with the special senses. 
        a. Identify the major olfactory structures and discuss their functions.
        b. Describe the major gustatory structures and discuss their functions.
        c. Describe the major visual structures and discuss their functions.
        d. Describe the major structures of hearing and balance and discuss their functions.
     2. Compare and contrast the special and general senses. 
  E. Peripheral nervous system 
     1. Name the cranial nerves, identify their distribution and summarize their functions.
     2. Examine a cross-section of a spinal nerve, identify the origin and distribution of the spinal nerves and summarize their function. 
     3. Recognize the major nerve plexuses and identify the parts of the body that they serve.
     4. Recognize the major nerves of the upper extremity, the lower extremity, the body wall and the head and neck. 
     5. Determine the functional impairment resulting from denervation. 
     6. Describe a simple reflex arc. 
  F. Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) 
     1. Describe effectors, preganglionic neurons, postganglionic neurons and ganglia. 
     2. Differentiate between the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the ANS in structure and function. 
     3. Identify the ANS centers of control found in the central nervous system.
     4. List the effects of the ANS on the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems.
  G. The endocrine system 
     1. Characterize the location, secretions and targets of the major endocrine glands.
     2. Examine central nervous system control and the endocrine glands. 

V. Maintenance of the Body and of the Species 
  A. Circulatory system 
     1. List the major components of the cardiovascular system. 
     2. Identify major blood elements such as plasma, erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets.   
     3. Identify the pericardium and layers of the heart wall, the chambers and valves, electrical excitation by conductive tissue, two major circulatory routes (pulmonary and systemic). 
     4. Describe coronary and fetal circulation. 
     5. Compare the histology of arteries and veins. 
     6. Name the principal arteries of the extremities, body wall, head and neck, visceral organs and the brain. 
     7. Name the principal veins of the extremities, body wall, head and neck, visceral organs and the brain. 
     8. Identify lymph vessels, lymph nodes and the major lymphoid organs. 
  B. Respiratory system 
     1. List the functions of the respiratory system. 
     2. Identify the parts of the conducting division and describe their functions. 
        a. Nose 
        b. Paranasal sinuses 
        c. Pharynx 
        d. Larynx 
        e. Trachea
        f. Bronchial tree 
     3. Identify the parts of the respiratory division and describe their functions. 
        a. Alveolar ducts 
        b. Alveolar sacs 
        c. Alveoli 
     4. Describe the lungs, their surfaces and pleurae. 
     5. Explain the mechanics of breathing. 
        a. Identify the muscles involved in breathing and their actions. 
           1) Explain inspiration. 
           2) Explain expiration. 
        b. Describe control of respiration. 
   C. Digestive system 
      1. List the general functions and activities of the digestive system. 
      2. Describe the mechanical and chemical aspects of digestion. 
      3. List the serous membranes and tunics of the gastrointestinal tract. 
         a. Identify the peritoneum and its reflections.
         b. Identify the layers (tunics) of the alimentary canal. 
      4. List the structures and major functions of the digestive system in the head and neck.  
         a. Identify the oral cavity. 
         b. Identify the teeth. 
         c. Identify the salivary glands. 
         d. Recognize the pharynx and its parts. 
         e. Identify the esophagus. 
      5. List the structures and major functions of the digestive system in the abdomen. 
         a. Describe the alimentary canal and the layers of its organs. 
            1) Identify the stomach and its layers. 
            2) Identify the small intestine and its regions.  
            3) Identify the large intestine and its regions. 
         b. Describe the accessory organs and the ducts associated with them. 
            1) Identify the liver. 
            2) Identify the gallbladder. 
            3) Identify the pancreas. 
  D. Urinary system 
     1. List the general functions and physiological processes of the urinary system. 
     2. List the structures of the urinary system. 
        a. Recognize the kidney and describe its functions. 
           1) Identify gross features of the kidney. 
           2) Describe microscopic structures of a nephron. 
              a) Recognize renal blood vessels. 
              b) Recognize urinary tubules. 
              c) Explain micturition. 
  E. Reproduction system 
     1. List the functions of the reproductive system. 
        a. Identify the primary sex organs. 
           1) Explain gamete production. 
           2) Identify major sex hormones and site of production. 
        b. Identify secondary sex organs. 
        c. List secondary sex characteristics. 
     2. Recognize male reproductive parts.  
        a. Describe the structure and function of the testis. 
        b. Describe the structure and function of the spematic ducts, accessory glands and penis.
        c. Explain the mechanisms of erection, emission and ejaculation. 
     3. Recognize female reproductive parts. 
        a. Describe the structure and function of the ovaries. 
        b. Describe the structure and function of the uterine tubes, uterus, vagina and vulva. 
        c. Explain the mechanisms of erection and orgasm. 
        d. Describe mammary gland anatomy. 
     4. List the homologies between male and female reproductive structures.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Completion of examinations, written and practical (NOT to include multiple-choice or a word bank) for each of the units of instruction = 80-100% of grade. The proscription against multiple-choice and word bank applies only to practical identifications, not to conceptual (written) portions.

Instructor discretion -- may include attendance, quizzes, written
assignments, oral presentation, group work, etc. = 0-20% of grade

Total = 100%

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing
and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises
and projects.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students entering a laboratory setting should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. The students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 140H

  • Title: HON: Human Anatomy*
  • Number: BIOL 140H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 144

  • Title: Human Anatomy and Physiology*
  • Number: BIOL 144
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 7

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness.

Description:

This course provides basic knowledge on human structures and their function. Students will study the relationship of structures to function in the organ systems of the human body. Emphasis will be on the identification of the anatomical features and their functions. This course is integrated lecture and laboratory. 7 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The Open Anatomy Lab, 311 CLB, is available for students enrolled in Human Anatomy and Human Anatomy and Physiology classes at JCCC. Contact your professor, check the schedule outside of 311 CLB or call 913-469-8500, ext. 4124, for hours. A current student ID is required for using the Open Anatomy Lab.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the basic structures of a human cell and describe the function of each of these structures.
  2. Recognize the systemic approach to body organization and use this approach to organize human structures.
  3. Identify histologic and gross structures associated with each body system.
  4. Describe functions of organs and organ systems.
  5. Demonstrate laboratory techniques and procedures required for study and assessment of the human body.
  6. Recognize anomalies and common pathological conditions of human organ systems.
  7. Refer to structures using professionally accepted terminology
  8. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and safe work habits in the laboratory. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Body Organization
   A. Define anatomy and physiology
   B. Explain the relationship between anatomy and physiology
   C. List the characteristics of life
   D. List the factors required for maintenance of life
   E. Use accepted anatomical terminology to describe body positions, sections, and regions
   F. Locate major body cavities
   G. Identify membranes
   H. Name the major organ systems and list the organs associated with
each
   I. Identify vital signs
   J. Define homeostasis and summarize its significance
   K. Describe the systemic approach of study of the human body and organize the body in this format.
II. Cytology
   A. Identify the human cell
   B. Identify the structures of the human cell
   C. List the functions of principle cell structures
   D. Summarize the Cell Theory
   E. Explain physiological movements through cell membranes
   F. Identify the stages of cell division in human cells
   G. Demonstrate proper staining of a human cell
   H. Identify prepared cells upon presentation
   I. Define common cytological terms
III. Histology
   A. Identify human tissues types upon presentation
   B. Categorize human tissues
   C. Describe the functions of each tissue type
   D. List locations of tissue types in the body
   E. Explain how glands are classified
   F. Define common histological terms
IV. Integumentary System
   A. List functions of the skin
   B. Identify the regions of the skin
   C. Identify organs of the integumentary system upon presentation
   D. List functions of the integumentary organs
   E. Describe factors involved in skin color
   F. Distinguish anomalies and pathologies of skin
   G. Define common dermatological terms
V. Skeletal System
   A. List functions of the skeletal system
   B. Identify bone structures
   C. Classify bones according to their shape
   D. Summarize bone growth and remodeling
   E. Recognize divisions of the skeleton
   F. Identify bones of the skeleton
   G. Identify foramina and processes of bones
   H. Distinguish anomalies and pathologies of bone
   I. Describe the effects of hormones that act on bone
   J. Classify joints based on structure and movement
   K. Identify joints
   L. Distinguish pathologies of joints
VI. Muscular System
   A. List the functions of the muscular system
   B. Identify structures within skeletal muscle
   C. Describe how muscles structure is organized
   D. Identify the muscle organs of the human body upon presentation
   E. Summarize the events of muscular contraction
   F. Explain how energy is supplied to muscle
   G. Summarize muscle fatigue
   H. Explain the effect of oxygen on muscle
   I. Describe how exercise affects skeletal muscle
   J. Identify the three types of muscle
   K. Summarize muscle group function
   L. Define common terms associated with muscle and kinesiology
   M. Distinguish common muscle pathologies
VII. Nervous System
   A. List the functions of the nervous system
   B. Describe how nervous tissue is organized
   C. Identify the types of nerve cells
   D. List functions of nerve cells
   E. Identify structures within nerve cells
   F. Explain how an injured nerve may regenerate
   G. Explain nerve cell potentials
   H. Summarize the events at a synapse
   I. Distinguish between types of post synaptic potentials
   J. List factors that affect post synaptic potentials
   K. List the components of the reflex arc
   L. Summarize the importance of nerve pathway organization
   M. Identify the meninges
   N. Distinguish between CNS and PNS
   O. Identify the organs of the CNS
   P. Identify the major parts of the brain and spinal cord
   Q. List the functions of the organs of the CNS
   R. Distinguish association areas of the cerebral cortex
   S. Distinguish between ANS and SNS
   T. Summarize the functions of the ANS
   U. Distinguish between the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the ANS
   V. Identify the nerves of the PNS
   W.    Distinguish common nervous system pathologies
   X. Identify special senses
VIII. Endocrine System
   A. Identify organs that secrete hormones
   B. Classify glands based on structure
   D. Classify glands based on function
   E. Explain hormone pathways and regulation
IX. Cardiovascular System
   A. Identify the components of blood upon presentation
   B. List the functions of each type of blood cell
   C. Explain control of red blood cell production
   D. List the functions of blood plasma
   E. Summarize blood typing procedures
   F. Summarize the events in coagulation
   G. Identify the structures of the heart
   H. Describe the pathway of blood through the heart chambers
   I. Explain heart contraction
   J. Summarize the events of the conduction system
   K. Identify common physiological tests
   L. Perform vital signs
   M. Identify the types of blood vessels
   N. Locate major arteries and veins of the body
   O. List functions of each type of blood vessel
   P. Distinguish common heart, blood, and vessel anomalies using standard
medical reports
   Q. Define terminology used in the medical community relating to
cardiovascular care
X. Digestive System
   A. Identify digestive organs, their regions, and structures upon
presentation
   B. Distinguish between alimentary canal organs and accessory organs
   C. List and explain the functions of the digestive system
   D. List the functions of each digestive organ
   E. Explain how the contents of the alimentary canal are moved
   F. Describe common pathologies of digestive organs
   G. Summarize factors that affect digestion
XI. Respiratory System
   A. Identify respiratory organs, their regions, and structures upon
presentation
   B. Summarize the events in inspiration and expiration
   C. List and explain the functions of the respiratory system
   E. Define common respiratory ailments
   F. List nonrespiratory air movements
   G. Classify respiratory organs as upper or lower tract
   H. Explain the exchange of gases at the alveolar level
   I. Distinguish common breathing anomalies using standard medical
reports
   J. Identify clinical pathologies of the respiratory system
XII. Urinary System
   A. Identify urinary organs, their regions, and structures upon
presentation
   B. List and explain the functions of the urinary system
   C. Trace the pathway of blood through the kidney
   D. Explain the events of urine formation
   E. Summarize the events of micturition
   F. Identify common anomalies of the urinary system
XIII. Reproductive System
   A. Identify reproductive organs, their regions, and structures upon
presentation
   B. List the functions of each reproductive organ
   C. Identify analogous organs of both gender systems
   D. Explain how hormones control sexual characteristics
   E. Trace the complete path of sperm cells
   F. Trace the complete path of an egg through fertilization and
pregnancy
   G. Identify common STDs
   H. Lymphatic System
   I. Identify lymphatic organs
   J. List the functions of the lymphatic system

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests will be the primary instruments used to measure the student's competencies. 


   Up to 90-100%     Tests and Final Exam
   Up to  0- 10%     Quizzes/Assignments
            100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Individual instructors may utilize attendance points for bonus points toward the final grade. These points are not to exceed 2% of the final points possible for the course.
  2. The schedule and procedures for this course are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 144H

  • Title: HON: Human Anatomy and Physiology*
  • Number: BIOL 144H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 145

  • Title: Human Anatomy and Physiology Dissection*
  • Number: BIOL 145
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOL 144 and department approval.

Description:

Students will dissect the cat and study the relationship of structures to function in the organ systems of the cat. In this laboratory course, they will also dissect the cow kidney, heart, brain and eye. Students will compare and contrast these structures and functions with the organ systems of the human body. 2 hrs. lab/wk. Students enrolling in BIOL 145 should have completed BIOL 140 or BIOL 144 and have the approval of the assistant dean.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Compare the external anatomy of the cat including the various surface areas and appendages with the human body.
  2. Compare each of the organ systems of the cat reviewed to the human body.
  3. Demonstrate dissection techniques and procedures required for gross study of the cat.
  4. Locate by dissection and describe the principal organs and organ systems of the cat.
  5. Dissect and describe selected organs of the cow, including the kidney, heart, brain and eye. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Identify and Describe the External Anatomy of the Cat, including:
   A. The external surface structures, regions and landmarks.
   B. The fore and hind appendages and their landmarks.

II. Locate by Dissection and Describe the Principal Organs and Organ
Systems of the Cat, including the:   
   A. Prominent muscles of the muscular system
   B. Digestive system
   C. Urogenital system
   D. Circulatory system
   E. Respiratory system
   F. Nervous system

III. Locate by Dissection and Identify the Specific Structures of Selected
Cow Organs, including the:
   A. Kidney.
   B. Heart.
   C. Brain and eye.

IV. Describe the Comparative Anatomy of the Cat, including:
   A. The external anatomy of the cat and the human.
   B. Each of the organs and organ systems of the cat and the human.
   C. Selected organs of the cat and the cow including the kidney, heart,
brain and eye.

V. Demonstrate Effective Dissection Techniques and Procedures Required for
the Gross Study of the Cat, including:
   A. Proper use and handling of equipment.
   B. Dissection techniques to avoid damage to discrete anatomical
structure.
   C. Proper labeling and note taking.
   D. Preservation and display of the dissected animal and its
organs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Laboratory tests using the actual dissection animals and organs will
be given during the course of the semester.  These exams will be short
answer questions based on organ identification.  Each exam will include
descriptive questions from the objectives given for each outline topic. 

      Tests                  90-100% of grade
      Dissection technique    0- 10% of grade
      Total                     100%   

Grading Scale:
   A = 90% - 100%
   B = 80% -  89%
   C = 70% -  79%
   D = 60% -  69%
   F =  0% -  59%

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing
and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises
and projects.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Because this laboratory course involves potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment (including sharp scalps), much care should be taken during dissection, including the wearing of protective clothing and devices. Appropriate behavior is essential to ensure safety of all concerned in the laboratory. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 150

  • Title: Biology of Organisms*
  • Number: BIOL 150
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 7

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOL 135 or department approval.

Description:

This is a survey of the five kingdoms of life. Monera, fungi, protista, plant and animal kingdoms will be presented, with emphasis on life cycles, anatomy, physiology and ecology of the major groups. 7 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. List and differentiate between the various Phyla and classes of organisms.
  2. Compare and contrast the various life cycles presented.
  3. Compare and contrast photosynthesis and respiration.
  4. Compare and contrast the various organs and systems of each group that is covered
  5. Differentiate between the various trophic levels of the ecological pyramid.
  6. List and differentiate between the divisions of plants and their classes.
  7. Compare and contrast the Monera, Fungi and Protista. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Cell and Mitosis
   A. List the cell organelles and describe the function of each.
   B. Compare and contrast plant and animal cells.
   C. List the stages of mitosis and differentiate between each stage.
   D. Define diffusion, osmosis and active transport.

II. Prokaryotic
   A. List the three bacterial types and the characteristics of bacteria.
   B. Compare and contrast prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
   C. Compare and contrast blue-green bacteria with Eubacteria.
   D. List three genera of blue-green bacteria.

III. Protista
   A. List the characteristics of protests.
   B. Reproduce the life cycles of Chlamydomonas and Spirogya.
   C. Compare and contrast the divisions listed.
   D. Describe the conjugation process.

IV. Protozoa and Porifera
   A. List the characteristics of protozoans.
   B. List the characteristics of sponges.
   C. Compare and contrast protozoans and sponges.
   D. List the phyla of protozoans and classes of sponges.

V. Cnidaria and Platyhelminthes
   A. List the characteristics of cnidarians.
   B. List the characteristics of flatworms.
   C. Compare and contrast flatworms and cnidarians.
   D. Compare and contrast fluke and tapeworm life cycles.

VI. Nematoda, Rotifera and Mollusca
   A. List the characteristics of mollusks.
   B. Compare and contrast rotifers and nematodes.
   C. Differentiate between the classes of mollusks.
   D. Reproduce the Ascaris life cycle.

VII. Annelids and Arthropods
   A. List the characteristics of annelids.
   B. List the characteristics of arthropods.
   C. Compare and contrast annelids and arthropods.
   D. Differentiate between arachnids and insects.

VIII. Echinoderms and Fish
   A. List the characteristics of echinoderms.
   B. List the characteristics of the fish groups.
   C. Name the four hallmark Chordata characteristics.
   D. Differentiate between Urochordata, Cephalochordata and Vertebrata.
   
IX. Amphibians and Reptiles
   A. List the characteristics of amphibians.
   B. List the characteristics of reptiles.
   C. Compare and contrast the orders of amphibians and reptiles.

X. Aves and Mammalia
   A. List the characteristics of birds and mammals.
   B. Name the orders and a representative of each mammal group.
   C. Compare and contrast birds and mammals.
   D. Differentiate between types of feathers.

XI. Fungi and Bryophytes
   A. Differentiate between fungi and bryophytes.
   B. Reproduce their respective life cycles.
   C. Compare and contrast mosses and liverworts.
   D. List the three classes of Eumycota and give examples of each.

XII. Vascular Plants
   A. Differentiate between the phyla of seedless vascular plants.
   B. Compare and contrast the pine, fern and club moss life cycles.
   C. Differentiate between seed plants and seedless plants.
   D. Compare and contrast vascular plants with non-vascular plants.

XIII. Angiosperms
   A. List the structure and function of the parts of a flower.
   B. List the various fruit types and give examples of each.
   C. Reproduce the angiosperm life cycles.
   D. Describe the function of epicotyl, hypocotyl and radicle.

XIV. Stems, Roots and Leaves
   A. Differentiate between stem, roots and leaves as to tissues in each.
   B. Compare and contrast herbaceous and woody dicots with monocot
stems.
   C. List specialized stems, roots and leaves.
   D. Differentiate between apical and lateral meristems.

XV. Ecology
   A. Reproduce the food pyramid and list the trophic levels.
   B. Describe a food web.
   C. Differentiate between the major biomes.
   D. Compare and contrast primary and secondary succession.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be
accomplished using the following methods:

      Weekly Tests         56% of grade
      Lab Practicals       37% of grade
      Scientific Paper      7% of grade
      Total               100% 

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing
and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises
and projects.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 155

  • Title: Bioethics*
  • Number: BIOL 155
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOL 121 or high school biology with department approval.

Description:

This course introduces students to the scientific, ethical and legal issues relevant to the discipline of biology and those raised by the rapid development of new biological technologies. Students will examine the major theories of ethics, including deontology, utilitarianism, and select others. Topics include: beginning of life issues such as contraception, abortion, and nontraditional methods of human reproduction; end of life issues such as advance healthcare directives and physician-assisted suicide; and other issues such as experimentation on human and animal subjects and human environmental impacts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. BIOL 155 and PHIL 155 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe a selection of the major ethical issues raised by biological research and development.

  2. Compare and contrast relevant ethical theories.

  3. Analyze an appropriate case and prepare a case study.

  4. Develop a reasoned ethical argument.

  5. Describe his/her operative ethical stance.

  6. Describe the nature of science and scientific methods.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Biology
  A. Compare and contrast science, pseudoscience, and non-science.
  B. Describe the importance of scientific methodologies.
  C. Describe the characteristics of life.
  D. Describe the basic features of evolution and the importance of evolution to biology.

II. Introduction to Ethics
  A. Compare and contrast morals and ethics.
  B. Describe the basic motivations for reasoned ethical discourse.
  C. Discuss primary secular ethical theories.
  D. Describe deontology, in terms of its major points, including its strengths and weaknesses.
  E. Describe utilitarianism, in terms of its major points, including its strengths and weaknesses.
  F. Describe religious ethics, in terms of its major points, including its strengths and weaknesses.
  G. Compare and contrast religious ethics and secular ethics as they relate to biological issues.
  H. Compare and contrast natural law, virtue, natural rights, and feminist caring in terms of their major points, strengths and weaknesses.
  I. Describe the influence of religion on the analysis of current biological issues.

III. Introduction to Case Study Analysis
  A. Describe the use of case studies as a means of preparing a reasoned ethical argument.
  B. Prepare a detailed outline of the six step analysis of an issue.
  C. Examine and discuss the salient points of sample case studies using the six step analysis.

IV. Develop and Describe a Personal Ethical Stance for the Purpose of Examining the Provided Cases 

V. Case Studies (for each of the provided cases):
  A. Identify and describe the relevant biological facts.
  B. List the salient ethical issues.
  C. Describe the available non-biological facts.
  D. Identify and describe the stakeholders.
  E. Identify and describe the values at stake.
  F. Identify and describe the possible solutions.
  G. Choose and justify the best solution and probable outcomes.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

1.  The semester grade will be determined as the points accumulated by the student as a percentage of the total points possible.
2. The values of assessments are as follows:

 30-50%    Examinations
 25-35%    Case study analyses
 15-25%    Explanation of the student’s personal ethical stance/worldview
 10-20%    Attendance and participation in discussions

   Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations:
    Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching
    skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 205

  • Title: General Genetics*
  • Number: BIOL 205
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOL 135 with a grade of "C" or higher or the equivalent introductory college-level course with a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

This introductory course emphasizes human heredity using concepts from classical and modern genetics. Themes of advancing technologies and bioethical issues are interwoven in the basic background fabric of the course. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe important historical developments in genetics, particularly the contributions of Mendel, and Watson & Crick; and important research advances.

  2. Describe the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells in enough detail to understand related genetic concepts.

  3. Describe mitosis and meiosis.

  4. Solve a variety of genetic problems using Punnett squares to illustrate Mendelian principles.

  5. Analyze human pedigree diagrams using examples from autosomal recessive and dominant traits, and sex-linked inheritance; predict the probability of carriers of a gene, and of occurrence of a trait among offspring.

  6. Describe the male and female reproductive systems; the formation of gametes; and the basic development of the embryo and fetus.

  7. Describe modern reproductive technologies such as artificial insemination, surrogate mothers, in-vitro fertilization; and appreciate related bioethical considerations.

  8. Describe techniques of prenatal diagnoses such as amniocentesis and chorion villus sampling, and appreciate bioethical considerations related to genetic counseling and potential therapeutic abortion.

  9. Discuss basic ideas involved in the structure and replication of DNA, and the concepts of protein synthesis in enough detail to understand concepts such as the one gene one polypeptide hypothesis; gene expression; mutations; and genetic engineering.

  10. Discuss the most important types of chromosomal and gene mutations, their causes, and their important human consequences.

  11. Discuss the basic concepts of genetic engineering and gene splicing, and appreciate the future consequences of these powerful technologies.

  12. Integrate the basic concepts of human genetics with the interwoven themes of advancing technologies and bioethical issues to gain awareness of the complex problems facing society, and form a framework for personal values and decisions.

  13. Identify and demonstrate knowledge of basic laboratory concepts related to both classical and modern genetics. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Genetics
   A. Identify important people and events in the history of genetics.
   B. Define the main areas of genetics such as molecular genetics,
transmission genetics and population genetics.
II. Cellular Basis of Structure and Growth
   A. Compare Prokaryotic Cells and Eukaryotic Cells.
   B. Review reproductive and development processes.
      1. Compare the processes and significance of mitosis and meiosis.
      2. Define development: growth and differentiation.
III. Mendelian Genetics: Basic Principles of Inheritance
   A. Discuss Mendel's research on pea plants.
      1. Solve problems involving dominant and recessive traits using Punnett Squares.
      2. Apply Mendel's Laws of Dominance, Segregation and Independent Assortment.
   B. Apply basic probability concepts to solve genetics problems.
   C. Solve problems involving multiple alleles to include human blood groups.
   D. Solve problems involving polygenic inheritance.
   E. Calculate gene frequencies using the Hardy-Weinberg Law.
IV. Human Genetics
   A. Analyze pedigree diagrams.
      1. Recognize pedigree symbols.
      2. Calculate simple probabilities related to pedigree analysis.
      3. Analyze autosomal pedigrees of recessive inheritance.
      4. Analyze autsomal pedigrees of dominant inheritance.
      5. Analyze pedigree of sex-linked traits.
   B. Describe the outcomes of genetic counseling.
   C. Use online and library resources related to human genetics.
V. Human Sexuality
   A. Review the female reproductive system and make reproductive systems.
   B. Compare spermatogenesis in the male with oogenesis in the female.
   C. Compare development of male and female genotypes.
   D. Describe genetic sexual disorders, including:
      1. Single gene disorders, such as pseudohermaphroditism and testicular pominization and chromosomal disorders, such as
         a. Turner's Syndrome
         b. Klinefelter's Syndrome
         c. XYY Males
VI. Reproductive Technologies and Choices
   A. Describe birth technologies, such as:
      1. Artificial insemination
      2. Surrogate motherhood
      3. In-Vitro fertilization
   B. Describe prenatal diagnosis, including:
      1. Amniocentesis
      2. Chorionic Villus sampling
   C. Compare different bioethical considerations related to new reproductive technologies and choices.
VII. Informational Macromolecules
   A. Review the chemistry of amino acids, proteins and enzymes.
   B. Describe and discuss DNA, and the following functions of genetic material:
      1. Transformation
      2. Transduction
      3. Structure and replication of DNA
   C. Describe RNA and protein synthesis to include:
      1. Messenger and Transfer RNA
      2. Protein synthesis
   D. Illustrate the basic mechanisms of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
VIII. Variation
   A. Discuss examples of genetic variation, including:
      1. Dominance and recessiveness (Phenylketonuria)
      2. Expressivity (Diabetes)
      3. Penetrance (Polydactyly)
      4. Delayed Onset (Huntington's Chorea)
      5. Co-Dominance (Human Blood Groups)
      6. Epistasis (Congenital Deafness)
   B. Discuss examples of variation caused by environment.
IX. Mutations
   A. Describe different chromosomal mutations, including:
      1. Deletions
      2. Duplications
      3. Inversions
      4. Translocations
      5. Downs Syndrome
   B. Describe types of gene mutations, including:
      1. Point mutations
      2. Frameshift mutations
      3. Spontaneous mutations
      4. Causes of mutations
   C. Discuss the genetic basis of many cancers including the role of:
      1. Oncogenes
      2. Tumor suppressor genes
      3. Chemical mutagens/carcinogens
      4. Radiation and other environmental factors
X. Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology
   A. Describe the main application areas of biotechnology in medicine, agriculture and other areas of society.
   B. Describe basic techniques used in recombinant DNA.
   C. Explain the basic principles behind the technologies involved in gene amplification and sequencing.
   D. Discuss ethical considerations of new technologies.
XI. Laboratory and Research Skills
   A. Demonstrate familiarity with the use of online biotechnology resources.
   B. Identify basic modes of Mendelian inheritance in selected species.
   C. Demonstrate basic techniques for staining and studying chromosomes.
   D. Use appropriate statistical and quantitative techniques such as chi-square
      tests in hypothesis testing.
   E. Demonstrate principles and proper techniques associated with modern genetic tools such as electrophoresis, and DNA amplification.
   F. Critically interpret information obtained using modern genetic techniques.
   G. Demonstrate elementary techniques associated with the use of key experimental organisms in modern genetic analysis and biotechnology such as bacteria, yeast and Drosophila.
   H. Use appropriate laboratory safety skills and sterile technique.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Lecture examinations given approximately every 3-4 weeks. 

Exams will be worth 50 to 75 points each.

Students will solve problems, analyze pedigrees, and respond to a variety of objective type questions.

  • Cumulative lecture final worth 100-150 points
  • Two laboratory exams over laboratory activities, each worth 50-75 points
  • Weekly lecture or laboratory quizzes, each worth 5-10 points
  • Research paper over some aspect of modern genetics of interest to the student and approved by the instructor worth 50 - 100 points. This paper can combine both internet and standard library research.

The final grade should consist of approximately the following:

  • 60% of total points from the lecture exams and the final
  • 10% of total from the research paper
  • 30% of total from laboratory exams and quizzes

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Computers will be used in conjunction with assignments in this course and basic competency in using the world wide web and word processing software will be assumed. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 214

  • Title: Introduction to Teaching Math and Science I*
  • Number: BIOL 214
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1.25
  • Lecture Hours: 1.25

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MATH 171 with a grade of "C" or higher or appropriate score on the math placement test or department approval.

Description:

This course allows math and science students to explore and develop an appreciation for teaching as a career. To support their learning, students will be introduced to the theory and practice that is necessary to design and deliver quality instruction. They will plan and implement lessons of an inquiry-based curriculum in an elementary classroom during the semester. MATH 214, ASTR 214, BIOL 214, CHEM 214, GEOS 214, PHYS 214 and PSCI 214 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Determine if teaching is a viable career path.
  2. Identify strategies for effective lesson planning and utilize these strategies to design and deliver inquiry-based lessons using the 5E Instructional Model.
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of personality and learning differences and discuss the implications for both teaching and learning.
  4. Use probing questions to elicit feedback to determine students' acquisition of knowledge.
  5. Revise lesson plans to reflect the needs of learners based on field experience gained in cooperation with a practicing classroom teacher.
  6. Research  and identify relevant state and national teaching standards.
  7. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of technology for teaching, communicating, and collaborating.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Teaching as a Career

A. Determine suitability/interest in teaching as a career through thoughtful self-reflection.

B. Explore pathways to a career in teaching.

C. Identify personal learning styles and discuss their implications for classroom interactions.

II. Strategies for Practical Lesson Design

A. Design and deliver inquiry-based hands-on lessons.

B. Write performance objectives for each lesson, including mathematics and/or science connections, and appropriate assessments for those objectives.

C. Use technology and the Internet to enhance classroom lessons, collaborate, and communicate.

III. Concepts and Components of Teaching Theory

A. Identify instructional strategies that meet the needs of diverse learners.

B. Distinguish between learner-centered and teacher-centered instructional strategies.

C. Discuss state and national science and mathematics standards and their implications for curriculum decisions.

D. Identify current issues in the theory and practice of teaching.

IV. Components of a Field Experience

A. Observe a math-science lesson taught by a cooperating teacher.

B. Interact with a population of diverse student learners in a school setting while teaching a lesson in an elementary school classroom.

C. Receive and synthesize feedback from a cooperating teacher as a peer and mentoring colleague in order to improve techniques.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-20%    Active classroom participation

20-30%    Lesson planning and associated activities

30-40%    Completion of field experience and associated activities

20-25%    Related assignments/homework

Grade Criteria:

This course uses non-standard grading criteria:
90-100% = A
80-89% = B
75-79% = C
70-74% = D
0-69% = F

Caveats:

To successfully complete the prerequisite(s) for this course, a student must earn at least a "C" in the prerequisite course(s) or earn an appropriate score on a placement exam. If a student is found not to have successfully fulfilled the prerequisite(s) for this course, the student will be dropped from the course.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 215

  • Title: Introduction to Teaching Math and Science II*
  • Number: BIOL 215
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1.25
  • Lecture Hours: 1.25

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ASTR 214 or BIOL 214 or CHEM 214 or GEOS 214 or MATH 214 or PHYS 214 or PSCI 214 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

Students learn about the middle school environment and work on math and science inquiry-based lesson analysis, design and assessment. Student partners will plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons in a middle school. The course emphasizes writing 5E lesson plans with a focus on the importance of using appropriate questioning and assessment strategies throughout the lesson, as well as how to analyze and modify a lesson based on personal reflections and observer feedback. By the completion of the course, students should be able to reflect on their personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science, and develop a feasible pathway to a career in teaching. MATH 215, ASTR 215, BIOL 215, CHEM 215, GEOS 215, PHYS 215 and PSCI 215 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Design inquiry-based middle school lesson plans, utilizing resources from exemplary inquiry-based science and mathematics lessons.
  2. Implement effective middle school teaching strategies based on the unique attributes of adolescents.
  3. Construct effective classroom learning activities using appropriate technology.
  4. Analyze data gained from pre- and post-assessments to evaluate student learning as a basis for revising lesson plans and teaching strategies.
  5. Employ techniques that offer educational equity among a population of diverse learners.
  6. Identify personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Practical Lesson Design

A. Design inquiry-based lessons using the 5E Instructional Model.

B. Write measurable performance objectives for each lesson.

C. Develop applicable pre- and post-assessments for the performance objectives.

D. Analyze student data acquired through pre- and post-assessments to improve future lesson planning.

E. Incorporate technology into at least one lesson in a manner that encourages enhanced student interaction and learning.

II. Teaching Theory

A. Identify instructional approaches that meet the needs of diverse middle school learners.

B. Develop questioning strategies to effectively interact with students with varying abilities and learning styles in a middle school classroom.

C. Develop achievable solutions to preserve instructional equity in the classroom environment.

III. Field Experience

A. Reflect upon observations of lessons taught by an experienced math/science teacher.

B. Teach three inquiry-based lessons to a middle school math or science class.

C. Use probing questions to elicit feedback to determine students’ acquisition of knowledge.

D. Synthesize feedback from both mentor teachers and master teachers in order to improve teaching techniques.

E. Reflect on teaching experiences in order to enhance future classroom interactions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15-25%    Active classroom participation and attendance
20-30%    Lesson planning and preparation
30-40%    Field experiences, reflections and associated activities
10-20%    Other assignments

100%        Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
75 – 79% = C
70 – 74% = D
0 – 69% = F

Caveats:

To successfully complete the prerequisite(s) for this course, a student must earn at least a “C” in the prerequisite course(s).  If a student is found not to have successfully fulfilled the prerequisite(s) for this course, the student will be dropped from the course.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 225

  • Title: Human Physiology*
  • Number: BIOL 225
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOL 140 or BIOL 144.
Prerequisites or corequisites: CHEM 122 or (CHEM 124 and CHEM 125).

Description:

This is an introduction to the dynamic functions of the human organism from the chemical and molecular mechanisms that sustain cellular processes through the control systems responsible for homeostasis and the influence of these systems on the cellular function of organ and systems operation. Laboratory investigation using selected biochemical and physiological preparations allows correlation of theory with experimental observations. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe, either orally or on a written exam, the basic components of the cell, their functions and roles in the operation of the cell.
  2. Relate the functions of the nervous and endocrine systems to the maintenance of a stable internal environment in the human body.
  3. Describe, orally or on a written exam, the organ composition of each system in the human body and explain the molecular-cellular function of that system's component tissues and organs.
  4. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the laboratory. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Molecular physiology
   A. Classes of organic molecules
         a. List and describe the classes of organic molecules, including:
carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids and mixed classes of organic
molecules.
         b. Explain the meaning of ions/cations/anions/polar and non-polar      
            molecules.
         c. Give examples of the different ways these molecules contribute
to the body's structure and function.
   B. Molecular control mechanisms-DNA and protein
      1. Genetic information
         a. Describe the elements of DNA and RNA.
         b. Explain the meaning of genetic code and describe its source.
      2. Protein synthesis
         a. Describe in detail the processes of transcription and
translation.
         b. List the factors that regulate protein synthesis in human
cells.
         c. Describe the factors that contribute to protein denaturing.      
   C. Energy and cellular metabolism
      1. Energy
         a. Explain the meaning of chemical energy and describe its source
in the human body (ATP).
         b. Describe the processes of energy activation, including aerobic
and anaerobic pathways that yield energy in the human body, including
glycolysis, Krebs cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glyconeogenesis,
deamination/transamination of amino acids, Cori cycle and beta oxidation
of fatty acids.
         c. Describe the four classifications of enzymatic reactions:    
            Oxidation-Reduction, Hydrolysis-dehudration, Chemical group
            Transfer, and Ligation
         d. Explain the difference between reversible and irreversible enzymes 
            (Law of Mass Action and Carbonic Anhydrase)
   D. Movement of molecules across cell membranes (In relation to homeostasis)
      1. Membrane structure
         a. Describe the structure of the cell membrane.
         b. Explain the how each of the cell membrane components
contribute to its function.
         c. Describe the differences between concentration and 
            electrochemical gradients.
      2. Transport through the cell membrane.
         a. Diffusion
            1) Describe the main factors that determine the magnitude,
direction and rate of diffusion.
            2) Explain how diffusion occurs through lipid bilayer and the
protein channels of the cell membrane.
         b. Mediated transport systems
            1) Explain the concept of mediated transport.
            2) Distinguish between facilitated diffusion and active
transport.
            3) Osmosis
               a) Describe the osmosis process and the effect of
electrolyte concentration on the direction and the rate of osmosis.
               b) Explain the meaning of solution tonicity, including
hypertonic, hypotonic and isotonic solutions.
      3. Bulk transport
         a. Explain the principles of endocytosis and exocytosis.
         b. Give examples for each of the above phenomena.
         c. Describe the membrane junctions (Cam’s, tight, and desmosomes) and explain epithelial
transport.
         d. Describe the process of secretion by glands and relate this
process to bulk transport.
         e. Explain the differences between various channels of transport 
            including:  Voltage gated, Chemical or Receptor gated, Ligand
            gated, Leaky channels and secondary transporters including:
            Symport (cotransport) and Antiport carriers.
   F. Homeostasis
      1. The balance concept and chemical homeostasis
         a. Distinguish between equilibrium and homeostasis.
         b. Explain the importance of homeostasis for the living cell.
      2. Components of homeostatic systems
         a. Explain the role of reflexes and local responses in
maintaining homeostasis.
         b. Describe the role of chemicals as messengers in regulating the
body's homeostasis.
         c. Explain enzyme modulation (allosteric, competitive activators/
            inhibitors, temperature and pH).
      3. Receptors
         a. Describe the receptor-operated channels.
         b. Distinguish between:  adrenergic, baroreceptor, cholinergic,
            ionotropic, metabotropic, and nicotinic receptors.
      4. Cellular Signal Transduction
         a. Explain the role of G-protein coupled receptors.
         b. Explain the roles of adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP.
         c. Explain the role of calcium as a “second messenger.”
         d. Describe the relationship between cyclic AMP and calcium as
well as other second messengers.

II. Body Systems
   A. Nervous system
      1. Structure of the nervous system
         a. Describe the physiological structure of neurons.
         b. Explain the meaning of blood-brain barrier.
      2. Membrane potentials
         a. Explain the basic principles of electricity.
         b. Describe the properties of a resting cell.
         c. Distinguish between graded potentials and action potentials.
      3. Synapses
         a. Describe the functional anatomy of synapses.
         b. Explain ion permeability in relation to membrane polarization.
         c. Explain the process of activating the postsynaptic cell.
         d. Explain the meaning of synaptic effectiveness.
         e. Explain the meaning of neurotransmitter and  list selected
number of these chemicals.
         f. Describe the process of modification of synaptic transmission by drugs and disease/enzymatic change and reuptake
         g. Explain termination of synaptic transmission
      4. Receptors and processing of afferent information
         a. Explain the meaning of receptors as part of the sensory
nervous system. (Baroreceptors, Mechanoreceptors, Nociceptors, Muscarinic, Nicotinic, Chemoreceptors)
         b. Define the sensory units.
         c. List and explain the basic characteristics of sensory coding.
      5. Patterns of neural activity: the flexion reflex
         a. Describe the different components of the reflex arc. 
         b. Explain the meaning of “reflex time” and “central
delay.”
   B. Muscular system
      1. Explain the molecular mechanisms of contraction.
      2. Describe the mechanics of muscle contraction.
      3. List the sources of energy for muscle contraction.
      4. List the steps of muscle fiber differentiation and growth.
      5. Define and distinguish between different the types of skeletal
muscle fibers.
      6. Describe the different behaviors of whole muscle contractions.
      7. Compare the structure and mechanism of contraction of the smooth
and skeletal muscle.
   C. Circulation
      1. Blood
         a. List the different components of plasma.
         b. Describe the role and function of cellular elements of the
blood.
         c. Explain the inactive plasma proteins associated with the        
      coagulation cascade and the role of the anticoagulants:  heparin, 
      antithrombin III and Protein C.
         d. Explain the role of intrinsic and extrinsic clotting factors in
      coagulation and how they are affected in liver disease.
         e. Explain the causes of hemophilia and intravascular thrombosis.
         f. Describe the rationale of various treatment options using anti-
      coagulants such as : Coumarin anticoagulants (Warfarin) and
      Acetylsalic acid (Asprin).
         g. Explain the causes of pulmonary embolism.
      2. Heart
         a. Describe the mechanisms of heartbeat coordination.
         b. List and explain mechanical events of the cardiac cycle.
         c. Define the cardiac output.
         d. Describe ECG and explain its importance as a diagnostic tool.
      3. Integration of cardiovascular function: regulations of systemic
arterial pressure
         a. Describe the different ways of controlling contractivity.
      4. Cardiovascular patterns in health and disease
         a. List and describe some of the cardiovascular disorders,
including hemorrhage and hypotension, hypertension and heart attack and
atherosclerosis.
         b. Describe the relationship between exercise and the
cardiovascular system.      
   D. Defense mechanisms of the body:  Immunology, foreign chemicals and
stress
      1. Immunology
         a. Describe effector cells of the immune system.
         b. Compare and contrast non-specific immune response and specific
immune response.
         c. Describe the role of blood types in transfusion reactions.
         d. List the factors that alter the body’s resistance to
infection.
         e. Describe allergy (hypersensitivity reactions).
         f. Define autoimmune diseases and list examples.
         g. Describe the role of the lymphatic system.
      2. Metabolism of foreign chemicals
         a. Describe the process of absorption and list the factors that
regulate its rate.
         b. List and describe the storage sites for foreign chemicals.
         c. Explain the process of excretion.
         d. Define biotransformation.      
   E. Respiratory system
      1. Differentiate between ventilation and perfusion balance and 
         imbalance.
      2. Describe the process of ventilation and lung mechanics in terms
         Of the Bohr’s effect.
      3. Describe the steps involved in exchange of gases in alveoli and
         Pulmonary diffusion and tissue perfusion.
      4. Explain the role of surfactant in gas diffusion.
      5. Describe the effect of pH on hemoglobin/O2 binding as it relates
         To the carbonic acid buffering system.
      6. Explain hemoglobin saturation and the oxyhemoglobin dissociation
         curve.
      7. Explain the method of O2-transport and CO2-transport.
      8. List and describe the different ways for controlling respiration
         and compliance.
      9. Explain the neural control of respiratory function.
     10. Explain intra-plural pressure and gas exchange as it relates to
         Boyle’s Law.
     11. Describe the events surrounding a histaminic reaction in relation
         to the ANS and airway resistance.
   F. Renal system
      1. Basic principles of renal physiology
         a. Explain the basic renal processes. 
         b. Explain ion movement in relation to luminal and apical tubule 
            membranes as it applies to secretion and reabsorption.
      2. Regulation of sodium, chloride and water balance
         a. Describe the methods of controlling sodium excretion: and its
effect on the regulation of extracellular volume.
         b. Describe the relationship of ADH secretion and extracellular
volume.
         c. Explain the renal regulation of extracellular osmolarity.
         d. Describe the effect of hydrostatic pressure on net filtration.
         e. Explain the relationship between enzymatic, hormonal, and 
            protein effects on hypovolemic, hyperosmotic, and hypokalemic  
            dehydration.
      3. Regulation of potassium, calcium and hydrogen ion concentrations
         a. Describe the role of the kidney in controlling the
concentration of these chemicals in the body.
         b. List the consequences of abnormal concentrations of these
chemicals in the body.
   G. Endocrine system
      1. Explain the phenomenon of hormone-target-cell specificity.
      2. Describe the chemical structure of hormones and the steps of
their synthesis.
      3. Explain the role of hormones in several body functions, including
transport, metabolism and excretion.
      4. Define the different mechanisms of hormone action.
      5. Describe the process behind the control of hormone secretion.
      6. List the control systems that regulate hormone secretion,
including hypothalamus and pituitary.
      7. Describe the physiological effects of stress.
   H. Digestive system
      1. Functions of the gastrointestinal organs
         a. List the steps involved in digestion and absorption.(Including
            the role of the Hepatic/Portal Venous system).
         b. Explain the role of the ANS in alimentary absorption and motility.
         c. Explain the role of gastrointestinal peptides including: Ghrelin and Anorexigenic 
            Antagonists, Leptins, GIP, CCK, secretin, and gastrin.
         d. List some examples of pathophysiological abnormalities in the
            gastrointestinal tract including:  Celiac’s, Diverticulitis, Type I and II Diabetes, 
            Fatty Liver, Hiatel hernia, Gastritis, Gerd, IBS, and Peritonitis.
         e. Explain alterations in metabolism as it relates to certain pathological digestive 
            conditions such as: constipation, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
         f.  Differentiate between Type I and II Diabetes and alternative pathways for 
             glucose metabolism in the diabetic.
         g.  Examine the influence of counter-regulatory hormones as it relates to Diabetes. 
         h.  Explain nervous integration of digestive reflexes.

   I. Reproduction system
      1. Male reproduction physiology
         a. Describe spermatogenesis.
         b. Explain the hormonal control of male reproductive functions.
      2. Female reproduction physiology
         a. List the ovarian functions.
         b. Define the control mechanisms of ovarian function.
         c. List the uterine changes in the menstrual cycle.
         d. Identify the non-uterine effects of estrogen and
progesterone.
         e. Describe the role of androgens in women.
         f. Explain the basic physiology of pregnancy.
      3. Chronology of sex development
         a. Describe sex determination.
         b. Define sex differentiation and list its steps.

III. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the laboratory, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the lab setting and recording data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Test grades                                   60%-90% of grade
Quizzes, varied lab and homework assignments  10%-40% of grade
         
Percentages will vary according to number of each of the above.

Computerized Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word
processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some
papers, exercises and projects.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students entering the laboratory should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. The students should conduct themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards. Goggles, gloves and other safety devices will be used when appropriate.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 225H

  • Title: HON: Human Physiology*
  • Number: BIOL 225H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 227

  • Title: Human Pathophysiology*
  • Number: BIOL 227
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOL 144 or BIOL 225.

Description:

This introduction to the physiology of disease covers common disorders of the body from the cellular to the systemic level. Topics include causes, symptoms, diagnostic tests and treatments of disease. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the different components of the human body, including cells, tissues, fluid compartments, organ systems
  2. List general abnormalities in these components that may lead to disease
  3. Trace the development of medicine from its earliest practice to modern times, describing major contributions of specific civilizations and scientists
  4. Correctly relate the 12 causes of diseases to the disease.
  5. Associate certain special diagnostic tests to the correct disease.
  6. Describe the principle of the body’s defense mechanisms
  7. Discuss verbally or in writing of the causes of selected diseases and their interrelationships.
  8. Describe the clinical manifestations of specific diseases.
  9. Describe the major disease processes and selected modes of prevention and treatment.
  10. Correctly relate specific disorders to a particular system and its functions. This includes the basic systems of the body. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Human Body
   A. Tissue Types
      1. List the major four types of tissues found in the human body.
      2. Explain the functions of each of these tissues.
   B. Cell Physiology
      1. Explain the basic physiological processes that take place in the
cells, such as metabolism, protein synthesis, and cell division.
      2. List the steps for each of the above processes.
      3. Give examples of abnormalities that may occur during the course
of these processes and explain how these abnormalities may contribute to
the development of certain diseases.
   C. Body Fluids
      1. List the different body fluid compartments and explain their
relationship to each other. 
      2. Explain how changes in these compartment contribute to changes in
the whole body.
      3. Give examples of diseases caused by such changes.
   D. Organ Systems
      1. Identify the different organs and their relationship the systems
of the body.
      2. Explain how a single organ may have more than one function and
how organ systems work together to express the synergistic nature of the
human body.

II. The History of Medicine
   A. Describe the contributions of major civilizations throughout history
to medicine, including Ancient Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, and Chinese
contributions.
   B. Describe the major scientists who contributed to the development of
medicine preceding the twentieth century. 
   C. Describe the most recent major contributions to medicine, including
molecular biology, genetic engineering, and the use of technology.

III. Classifications of Disease
   A. List the major categories of disease, including hereditary, 
congenital, traumatic, iatrogenic physical, chemical, infectious,
inflammatory, vascular, metabolic, nutritional, psychologic, idiopathic,
and tumors.
   B. Give example of specific disease for each of the above categories. 
   C. Describe the physiological basis of each disease.
   D. Describe the methods of diagnosis and treatment of each disease.

IV. Disease Processes
   A. Disturbances of Blood Flow and Derangement of Body Fluids
      1. Describe the forces involved in the normal fluid exchange between
the different compartments of the body.
      2. Describe the basic principles of edema and list the blood and
fluid abnormalities that lead to edema.
      3. List some blood and fluid disturbances, including hemorrhage,
thrombosis, embolism, ischemia, and hypertension.
      4. List the pathophysiological causes of the above disturbances and
explain their effect on the normal function of the body, including
dehydration, shock and acid-base balance.
   B. Inflammation and Repair
      1. Explain the general principles of inflammation and list the steps
of  its development.
      2. Describe the cellular and humoral responses to injury.
      3. Describe the systemic defense mechanisms, including fever,
leukocytosis, and pain.
      4. Describe the usual results and complications of inflammation and
distinguish between acute and chronic inflammation.
      5. List the normal steps of healing and repair.
      6. Explain the principal steps of inflammation management.
   C. Immune Functions and Disorders
      1. List the cells involved in immune response and describe their
activities.
      2. Describe the chemical nature of antibodies and explain the steps
of their synthesis.
      3. Explain the phenomenon of antibody-antigen reaction and describe
its contributions to the body's defense mechanism.
      4. Explain the meaning of some terms related to the immune system
and its disorders, including cytokines, immunity, hypersensitivity.
      5. Describe the four types of hypersensitivity reactions, including
anaphylaxis, cytotoxic, immune complex-mediated hypersensitivity, and
cell-mediated reactions.
      6. Explain the difference between inherited and acquired forms of
immunodeficiency, and give specific examples for each form.
      7. Explain the general principles of autoimmune disorders and give
example of specific diseases classified under this category. 
   D. Infectious Diseases
      1. Describe the basic pathophysiology of microbial infection and
disease, including bacterial, viral, fungal parasitic, and neoplasia
infections.
      2. Give examples and statistics of incidence for each of the above
infections.
      3. Describe the method of diagnosis and treatment of infectious
diseases.
   E. Inherited Disease
      1. Define the meaning of heredity and inherited disease.
      2. Give examples of inherited diseases and list their causes.
      3. Describe the methods involved in the diagnosis and treatment of
inherited diseases.

V. Organs (Systems) and Their Diseases
   A. List some diseases related to specific organs and/or systems,
including circulation, respiration, digestion, liver and gall bladder,
pancreas, kidney, reproduction organs, endocrine glands, blood and
lymphatics, nervous system, musculoskeletal system.
   B. Explain the physiological disorders involved in developing these
diseases.
   C. Describe the methods of diagnosis and treatment of the above
diseases.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Assignments     10% of grade
Unit exams      60% of grade
Final Exam      30% of grade
               100%
 
Grading Scale:
   A = 90% - 100%
   B = 80% -  89%
   C = 70% -  79%
   D = 60% -  69%
   F = 59% or less

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 227H

  • Title: HON: Human Pathophysiology*
  • Number: BIOL 227H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 230

  • Title: Microbiology*
  • Number: BIOL 230
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CHEM 122 or CHEM 124 and CHEM 125 or one year of high school chemistry.

Description:

This is a general introductory course in microbiology. It provides a background in many areas of microbiology with an emphasis on medical aspects. The structure, physiology, antimicrobial agents, immunology and host-parasite relationship of microorganisms will be studied, with an emphasis on bacteria. 3 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe important historical developments which led to the formulation of the germ theory of disease, including the contributions of Koch and Pasteur.
  2. Describe eukaryotic cells in enough detail to understand host responses to microorganisms.
  3. Describe in detail the structure and function of prokaryotic (bacterial) cells.
  4. To have a knowledge of Gram staining process and compare Gram positive and negative cells as to the structure of their cell walls, as well as production of endotoxins and exotoxins and their relative sensitivity to various antibiotics.
  5. Recall a basic understanding of organic chemistry and of biochemistry as related to bacteria, particularly to understand fermentation and to appreciate some of its applications in industry and society.
  6. Describe the basic ideas involved in the replication of DNA and in protein synthesis in enough detail to understand microbial genetics, how viruses infect cells, the basic ideas of gene splicing and the development of resistance to antibiotics.
  7. Become familiar with the basics of microbial genetics to include the concepts of transformation, conjugation and transduction and the basic types and causes of mutations.
  8. Describe the basic structure and characteristics of viruses, with particular emphasis on the AIDS virus.
  9. Become familiar with the basic fundamentals of antibiotics to include mechanisms of action, development of resistance and laboratory determination of sensitivities.
  10. Describe mechanisms by which bacteria cause disease using selected examples to illustrate the ideas of invasiveness and/or toxigenicity.
  11. Describe the basic non-specific defenses of the host.
  12. Become cognizant of the specific defenses of the host involved in the antigen-antibody reactions including the basic structure of antibodies and their reactions with other components of the immune system, the role of the neutrophils, macrophages, B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes, the role of basophils in allergies and hypersensitivities, autoimmunity, and identify examples of natural, artificial, active and passive immunity.
  13. Describe, as time permits, important diseases caused by staphylococci, streptococci; acid-fast bacteria; gram-negative bacilli; fungi; and viruses.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Microbiology
   A. The development of the germ theory of disease
      1. Early work to disprove the theory of spontaneous generation
      2. Contributions of Pasteur and Koch
   B. Basic techniques of microbiology
      1. Isolation of pure cultures
      2. Staining:  Gram stain and acid-fast stain

II.Cell Structure and Function
   A. Eukaryotic cells
   B. Prokaryotic cells
      1. Cell wall
      2. Plasma membrane
      3. Capsules
      4. Pili
      5. Flagella
      6. Bacterial chromosome
      7. Plasmids
      8. Ribosomes
      9. Inclusion granules
     10. Endospores

III. Introduction to Biochemistry
   A. Major groups of organic compounds
   B. Enzymes
   C. Functional groups
   D. Common biochemical reactions
   E. Glycolysis and fermentation
   F. Kreb's cycle
   G. Oxidative phosphorylation
     
IV. Microbial Genetics
   A. Watson-Crick model of DNA and of DNA replication
   B. Protein synthesis
   C. Mutations and causes of mutations
   D. DNA transfer in prokaryotic cells
      1. Transformation
      2. Conjugation
      3. Transduction
   E. Gene splicing

V. Viruses
   A. Basic structure and characteristics of viruses
   B. Replication of bacteriophages
   C. Lysogeny
   D. Replication of animal viruses
   E. Representative animal viruses
   F. Growing viruses in the laboratory

VI. Chemotherapy
   A. Fundamentals of chemotherapy
   B. Determination of drug and antibiotic sensitivities
   C. Drug resistance
   D. Mechanisms of drug action

VII. Host Defense Mechanisms
   A. Definitions
      1. Normal flora
      2. Symbiotic relationships
      3. Disease and infection
      4. Pathogenicity and virulence
   B. Toxigenicity of microorganisms
   C. Concept of virulence
   D. Non-specific and mechanical barriers of the host
      1. Physical barriers
      2. Chemical barriers
      3. Non-specific biological barriers
      4. Blood and its components
         a. Liquid portion
         b. Formed elements
   E. Specific defense mechanisms:  Antigen/Antibody reactions
      1. Acquired resistance to infection
         a. Natural active immunity
         b. Natural passive immunity
         c. Artificial active immunity
         d. Artificial passive immunity
      2. Cells of the immune system
      3. Characteristics and structure of antibodies
      4. Induction of the immune response
      5. Disorders associated with the immune system
         a. Allergies and anaphylaxis
         b. Autoimmunity
         c. AIDS

VIII. Microorganisms and Human Disease
   A. Diseases caused by pyogenic cocci.
   B. Diseases caused by gram-negative enteric bacilli and coccobacilli
and non-fermentators.
   C. Diseases caused by acid-fast bacilli.
   D. Diseases caused by anoerobic bacilli.
   E. Diseases caused by fungi, parasites and viruses.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

There will be a minimum of four examinations.  Exams will be worth at
least 100 points each.  Material may be taken from the lectures, textbook
and handouts. Policies regarding dropping of one lowest exam score or
attendance as it may affect grades and of make-up exams are left to the
discretion of the instructor.
  
Bonus points, up to a maximum of twelve (12) may be added to the numerator
of the final raw score. These points may be based on quizzes or other
assignments as determined by the instructor.

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing
and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises
and projects.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 230H

No information found.

BIOL 231

  • Title: Microbiology Lab*
  • Number: BIOL 231
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOL 231 students must be currently enrolled in BIOL 230 or have successfully completed BIOL 230 within the last three years.

Description:

Students will learn aseptic techniques and apply them in the isolation of pure cultures of bacteria. Students will also perform various staining techniques and chemical tests to identify these bacteria. The response of bacteria to changes in environmental conditions will also be examined. Various life stages of medically important parasites will also be observed. 4 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Maintain a safe and aseptic technique when handling and transferring bacterial cultures.
  2. Use careful precautions to avoid accidents and to take proper action if a spill or accident does occur.
  3. Successfully use the microscope in the study of microorganisms; be able to calibrate and use an eyepiece micrometer to measure microorganisms; and be familiar with the darkfield microscope.
  4. Make satisfactory smears of bacterial cultures on slides and satisfactorily stain the smears using several techniques.
  5. Isolate pure cultures of bacteria using enrichment and streaking techniques.
  6. Identify pure cultures of bacteria using a variety of selective and/or differential media
  7. Understand serial dilutions and quantitatively estimate the number of bacteria in milk, food or broth.
  8. Determine the sensitivities of bacteria to antibiotics using the Kirby-Bauer paper disc method.
  9. Understand several methods of culturing bacteria under anaerobic conditions.
  10. Recognize life cycle stages of several important parasitic protozoans and helminths. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Microscope
   A. Successfully use compound microscopes.
   B. Demonstrate microscopic measurement techniques.
   C. Calibrate an eyepiece micrometer.

II. Staining Procedures and Bacterial Morphology
   A. Staining procedures
      1. Clean microscopic slides.
      2. Aseptically transfer microbes.
      3. Make the following bacterial preparations:
         a. Simple stain
         b. Gram stain
         c. Capsule stain
         d. Endospore stain
         e. Metachromatic granules stain
         f. Acid fast stain
   B. Identify different types of bacterial morphology using the following
techniques:
      1. Student prepared slides from bacterial cultures.
      2. Slides prepared commercially from clinical specimens grown as
bacterial cultures.
      3. Darkfield microscopy to study both morphology and motility.

III. Basic Techniques and Concepts
   A. Demonstrate pure culture techniques.
      1. Make loop-inoculated pour plates.
      2. Streak for isolation of pure colonies from a mixed bacterial
culture.
   B. Bacterial population counts
      1. Use a serial dilution method to make bacterial population
counts.
   C. Identify enteric bacteria and other gram-negative bacilli.
      1. Use pure lab cultures.
      2. Isolate bacteria from the student’s body into pure culture.
      3. Characterize and identify a bacterial culture from the
student’s body.
   D.Identify unknown bacteria to genus and species using gram stain,
biochemical and other microbiological methods for identification.
   E. Determine environmental effect on bacteria including antibiotics,
ultraviolet radiation and 
  anaerobiosis.

IV. Important Parasitic Protozoans and Helminths
   A. Observe and identify the infective and/or disease-related life cycle
stages of the following medically important parasites:
      1. Protozoans, such as Plasmodium, Entamoeba, Trypanosoma.      
      2. Flatworms to include important flukes and other flatworms.
      3. Roundworms such as Trichinella, Ascaris, hookworm and
others.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Practical exams, worth 50 points each = 40% of grade
Lab assignments, attendance and short quizzes worth a minimum of 60% of
grade 
Total = 100%

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing
and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises
and projects.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 235

  • Title: General Nutrition*
  • Number: BIOL 235
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: [CHEM 122 or (CHEM 124 and CHEM 125)] AND [BIOL 144 or (BIOL 140.
Prerequisites or corequisites: BIOL 225)].

Description:

This introductory course provides a basic knowledge of human nutrition. Students will learn the sources and functions of the various nutrients. They will also explore the interaction of diet, disease prevention and treatment. Through the use of a computerized nutrition program, students will analyze their diets for nutritional deficiencies and excesses. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. List the essential nutrients, their major food sources and functions.
  2. Describe the purposes and limitations of the Recommended Dietary Allowances of the U.S. Food and Nutrition Board.
  3. Analyze the adequacy of their diet with the aid of (a) food group plans, (b) food composition tables; and (c) computerized nutrition program.
  4. Recognize nutritional risk factors in relation to disease.
  5. Differentiate reliable from unreliable sources of nutrition information.
  6. Recognize abnormal eating behaviors and learn techniques to modify these behaviors.
  7. Summarize digestion and metabolism of nutrients.
  8. Discuss the nutritional needs of humans from pre-conception through adulthood. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Preparation for a Diet Analysis
   A. Define the six classes of essential nutrients.
   B. Utilize the units of measurement as required in nutrition.
   C. Locate current food competition tables and describe how they are
used.
   D. Explain food grouping plans and their use for dietary analysis.
   E. Describe the purpose and limitations of food labels and DRV (Dietary
Reference Value).
   F. Assess food habits.
   G. Perform a nutrition assessment.
II. Food Quality and Safety
   A. Recognize the appropriate vs. inappropriate use of supplements.
   B. Define the FDA food safety regulations.
   C. Identify the methods necessary to prevent food-borne illness.
III. The Digestive Tract
   A. Describe the functions of each section of the digestive system.
   B. List and describe the hormones and enzymes associated with the
digestive process.
   C. Describe the metabolism of the energy nutrients.
IV. Energy Nutrients
   A. Proteins
      1. Explain the process of protein digestion and metabolism.
      2. Define and differentiate essential and non-essential amino
acids.
      3. Calculate nitrogen balance in diet histories.
      4. Describe the different forms of vegetarianism and their
benefits.
      5. Construct a vegetarian meal plan.
   B. Carbohydrates
      1. Explain the process of carbohydrate digestion and metabolism.
      2. Define and differentiate simple versus complex carbohydrates.
      3. Explain how the body regulates blood glucose levels.
      4. Define the following carbohydrate diseases:
         a. Diabetes mellitus
         b. Hypoglycemia
         c. Lactose intolerance
         d. Dental caries
      5. Identify the different types of dietary fiber, their functions
and relationship to health and disease.
   C. Lipids and Fats
      1. Explain the digestive process, source, and function of the
following dietary lipids:
         a. Triglycerides
         b. Phospholipids
         c. Cholesterol
      2. Describe the dietary sources, functions, and dietary
recommendations for fatty acids.
         a. Define and differentiate saturated versus unsaturated fatty
acids.
         b. Define and differentiate monounsaturated versus
polyunsaturated fatty acids.
         c. Define and differentiate Omega-3 versus Omega-6 fatty acids.
      3. Describe the correlations between heart disease, blood and
dietary lipids.
V. Energy Balance and Weight Control
   A. Recognize of the multiple standards for desirable body weight/body
fat.
   B. Describe energy imbalances and their consequences.
   C. Calculate individual energy requirements.
   D. Contrast a sound weight loss plan with weight loss fads and
fallacies.
   E. Compare and contrast eating disorders and their treatments.
VI. Nutrition and Physical Activity
   A. Recognize the nutritional implications for various levels of
physical activity.
VII. Vitamins
   A. List the function, dietary source, and disease implications of the
following water soluble vitamins:
      1. Thiamin
      2. Riboflavin
      3. Niacin
      4. Pyridoxine (B6)
      5. Folacin
      6. Cobalamin (B12)
      7. Pantothenic Acid
      8. Biotin
      9. Ascorbic Acid (C)
   B. List the function, dietary source, and disease implications of the
fat soluble vitamins:
      1. Vitamin A
      2. Vitamin D
      3. Vitamin E
      4. Vitamin K
 
VIII. Minerals
   A. List the function, dietary source, bioavailability and disease
implications of the following major minerals:
      1. Calcium
      2. Phosphorus
      3. Sodium
      4. Chloride
      5. Potassium
      6. Magnesium
      7. Sulfur
   B. List the function, dietary source, bioavailability and disease
implications of the following minor minerals:
      1. Iron
      2. Iodine
      3. Fluoride
      4. Zinc
      5. Selenium
      6. Copper
      7. Chromium
IX. Water
   A. State the bodily requirements for fluid.
   B. Specify the role of water in bodily functions.
   C. Identify the consequences of dehydration.
X. Lifecycle Nutrition
   A. Define the nutritional needs pre-conception.
   B. Define the nutritional needs of pregnancy and lactation.
   C. Define the nutritional needs of infancy.
   D. Define the nutritional needs of childhood.
   E. Define the nutritional needs of adulthood.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams and quizzes:    70% of grade
Projects, including in-class exercises, a term paper,
and a diet analysis:  30% of grade
  Total:             100%  

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet skills for completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 235H

  • Title: HON: General Nutrition*
  • Number: BIOL 235H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 240

  • Title: General Pharmacology*
  • Number: BIOL 240
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOL 225.

Description:

This course provides a basic understanding of the science of drugs-how they work and what they do. Students will study various drug concepts including mechanism of action, pharmacologic class, pharmaco-kinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical implications. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. Spring.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the basic concepts of Pharmacokinetics, including factors which influence drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion.
  2. Predict appropriate route of administration for drugs based on their physical-chemical properties.
  3. Describe various factors associated with individual variations in drug response.
  4. Differentiate drugs by pharmacologic class and mechanism of action.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of various physiological interdependencies and drug interactions on these systems.
  6. List approved therapeutic uses of, major adverse effects of, and significant drug interactions for commonly used drugs.
  7. Interpret technical drug information into meaningful terms to explain its clinical implications. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Define key drug terms
   B. Outline the properties of an ideal drug
   C. Review the history of pivotal federal drug acts
II. General Principles of Drug Action
   A. Pharmacokinetics
      1. Describe the absorption process across membranes
      2. List various route of administration
         a. Advantage
         b. Disadvantage
      3. Explain the process of drug distribution
      4. Outline the process and rationale for drug metabolism
         a. Phase I
         b. Phase II
      5. Describe the process by which drugs are excreted
      6. Discuss how drugs with various physical chemical properties are
absorbed, distributed, metabolized and excreted
      7. Solve problems using drug variables to predict pharmacologic
outcomes
   B. Pharmacodynamics
      1. Diagram the time course of drug response and representive
profiles
      2. Define and describe therapeutic drug index and terminology
      3. Interpret dose-response relationships via graded response curves
      4. Define and explain drug-receptor interactions and theories
         a. Agonist
         b. Antagonist
      5. Discuss drug “responses” not involving receptors
      6. List and explain how various factors affecting drug response
III. Physiology and Pharmacology of Peripheral Nervous System
   A. Outline and define the key structural components of the neuron and
synapse
   B. Describe the process involved in neuronal stimuli response
   C. Identify various neurotrasmitters
   D. Outline and define the major divisions of the nervous system
   E. Discuss interdependencies between the nervous system divisions
IV. Cholinergic Agents
   A. Describe the role and scope of the cholinergic nervous system
   B. Define cholinergic receptor subtypes
   C. Define cholinergic terms and give specific examples
   D. List and describe pharmacological properties and uses for nicotinic
and muscarinic agonists
   E. List and describe pharmacologic properties and uses for nicotinic
and muscarinic antagonists
   F. Summarize various drug class and discuss interdependencies
V. Adrenergic Agents
   A. Describe the role and scope of adrenergic nervous system
   B. Define adrenergic receptor subtypes and relationship of molecular
size and shape
   C. Define terminology and provide examples
   D. Discuss the importance of adrenergic neurotransmitter biosynthesis
   E. List and describe pharmacological properties and uses for various
alpha and beta agonists
   F. List and describe pharmacologic properties and uses alpha and beta
antagonists
   G. Summarize drug class and discuss interdependencies
VI. Central Nervous System
   A. Review physiology of human brain, structure and function of
blood-brain barrier, and CNS neurotransmitters
   B. Identify the cause, symptoms, and drug treatment for Parkinson’s
Disease
   C. List and describe of epilepsy and various anti-epileptic drugs
   D. Discuss role of GABA agonists as anti-spasmodic agents
   E. Summarize the theories involved in the manifestation of various
psychoses and recommended drug treatments
   F. Outline the theories for management of depression
   G. Discuss the use of depressants (sedative-hypnotics)
   H. Summarize the effect of neurotransmitter imbalances
VII. Opioid Analgesics and Anesthetics
   A. Discuss Opioids: their history, various definitions and terms, and
their mechanism of action
   B. Compare and contract various opioid analgesics
   C. Discuss the theories and stages involved in general anesthesia
   D. Describe various general anesthetics and their use
   E. Describe various local anesthetics and their use   
VIII. Alcohol, Stimulants and Drugs of Abuse
   A. Differentiate various types of alcohols
   B. Summarize the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of ethyl alcohol
   C. Explain the drug interaction between ethanol and disulfiram
   D. Explain methanol toxicity
   E. Compare and contrast the methyl exanthines
   F. Identify various stimulants and their recommended use
IX. Drugs for Headaches
   A. Discuss migraine, cluster and tension-type headaches and describe
their differences
   B. Describe the pharmacology of ergot alkaloids and sumatriptan
   C. Summarize various drug treatments for headaches
X. Cardiovascular Drugs
   A. Generally describe various approaches in the treatment of
hypertension
   B. Describe renal physiology and water reabsorption
   C. Compare various classes of diuretics and their side effects
   D. Discuss direct and indirect vasodilators and their use
   E. Evaluate use of cardiac glycosides for congestive heart failure
   F. List and describe various classes of anti-arrhythmic drugs
   G. Summarize managed care approaches for hypertension and cardiac
dysfunction
XI. Respiratory Tract Drugs
   A. Describe the cause and biochemical irritants involved in asthma
   B. Discuss Rhinitus, the role of histamine, and the use of various
anti-histamines
XII. Gastrointestinal Drugs for Peptic Ulcer Disease
   A. Discuss the role of histamine in gastric secretion
   B. Describe an additional casual links in peptic ulcer disease
   C. Outline various drug and non-drug treatments for gastric ulcers
XIII. Anti-Inflammatory Agents
   A. Describe of prostaglandins, their stimulatory responses, and
nomenclature
   B. List the therapeutic use of prostaglandins
   C. Compare and contrast various NSAIDs
   D. Evaluate various aspirin formulations and pharmacokinetic
relationships
   E. Discuss glucocorticoids as anti-inflammatory agents
   F. Describe the drug class and its uses
XIV. Anti-Thrombic Drugs
   A. Outline the process of clotting and homeostasis
   B. Describe various anti-coagulants, thrombolytic drugs and antidotes
   C. Summarize the various roles of prostaglandins
XV. Endocrine
   A. Describe the effect of thyroid hormones, clinical manifestations of
hormonal imbalance, and specific drug therapies
   B. Discuss Cushing’s Syndrome and Andrenocorticoids
   C. Outline various forms of diabetes and long term complications
   D. Describe the drug treatments for diabetes
XVI. Anti-Antherosclerosis Drugs
   A. Discuss the relationship between lipoproteins and
lipid/triglycerides
   B. Compare various drug and non-drug treatments in lowering blood
cholesterol and triglycerides
   C. Summarize the drug class and various treatments
XVII. Anti-bacterial and Anti-Fungal Drugs
   A. Define various microbiology terms relating to this drug class
   B. Outline bacteria physiology and selective toxicity
   C. Describe anti-bacterial drug classes and resistance
   D. Compare and contrast bacteria and fungus physiology
   E. Discuss various anti-fungal drugs and side effects
   F. Summarize the drug class and descrube selective toxicity
XVIII. Anti-Viral Agents
   A. List and describe components of viral particles and their “Life”
cycle
   B. Discuss points for drug intervention in viral replication
   C. Compare various anti-viral drugs and their side effects
   D. Summarize the drug class and describe selective toxicity 
XIX. Neoplastic Agents
   A. Describe cellular growth cycle
   B. Discuss the causes of cancer, theories involved, and differentiation
between normal and cancerous cells
   C. Illustrate the role of DNA and its components
   D. Compare the various classes of anti-neoplastic agents and side
effects.
   E. Summarize the drug class and describe selective toxicity

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   Exams           60% of grade 
   Final Exam      40% of grade
                  100%
   Extra Credit Assignment* - 20 points
      
* A clear, concise summary of a drug of the student’s choice (not
discussed in this course) outlining the mechanism of action,
pharmacokinetics, recommended use, adverse side effects, and drug
interactions.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

BIOL 291

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