Electrical Technology (ELTE)

Courses

ELTE 110   AC/DC Circuits* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval.

This is an introductory course that addresses the basics of Direct Current (DC) and Alternating Current (AC) circuits. The lab component to this course will expand on concepts taught in lecture by incorporating hands-on projects using common components found in the electrical industry. Students will gain experience in the process of reading and troubleshooting schematic drawings using electrical measuring equipment. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELTE 115   Print Reading* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval.

This course addresses the fundamentals of interpreting construction drawings. Students learn to read specification manuals and prints as applied to electrical installations in residential, commercial and industrial buildings. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

ELTE 122   National Electrical Code I* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELTE 110.

This is an introductory course on the use and interpretation of the current National Electrical Code (NEC), chapters 1-4. Students will learn the purpose and history of the code; develop a working knowledge of the code requirements for wiring, protection, materials and equipment; and be able to discern between wiring methods used in different occupancies. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

ELTE 125   Residential Wiring* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELTE 110 and ELTE 115.

This course covers residential wiring methods that include practical application and hands-on experience in implementing the code requirements. Installation rules and circuit designs for switches, receptacles, luminaires and appliances will also be discussed. The student will explore necessary skills to install electrical systems in a residential occupancy, meeting the minimum requirements as set forth in the current National Electrical Code (NEC). 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELTE 150   Solar Electric Systems* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 125.

Solar Electric Systems presents the key components of photovoltaic (PV) conversion systems to produce electricity from sunlight. Solar module types and properties, balance of system components, stand-alone and utility interface, energy management and economics for a variety of PV applications are studied. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELTE 175   Low Voltage Wiring* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 200.

This course covers the basic theory, installation standards and code requirements for various low voltage systems and their connecting devices. Discussion of closed circuit television, security, telephone, fire alarm, computer networking and wireless systems will be incorporated with hands-on experience installing and terminating conductors and cables in a lab environment. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELTE 200   Commercial Wiring* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 110 and ELTE 115.

This course covers commercial wiring methods that include practical application and hands-on experience in implementing the code requirements. Conduit hand bending techniques, conductor sizing and various wiring methods will also be discussed. The student will explore necessary skills to install electrical systems in a commercial occupancy, meeting the minimum requirements as set forth in the current National Electrical Code (NEC). 3 hrs. lecture/wk, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELTE 202   Electrical Estimating* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 115.

This course covers the process of estimating the cost of an electrical design. Students will learn to develop an electrical estimate for a residential and commercial design. Emphasis will be placed on compiling a take-off list of materials from blueprints, determining material and labor cost, writing bid proposals and creating change orders. 2 hrs. lecture/wk, 3 hrs lab/wk.

ELTE 222   National Electrical Code II* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 122.

This course is a continuation of the National Electrical Code I course on the use and interpretation of the current National Electrical Code (NEC), chapters 5-9. Students will develop a working knowledge of the code requirements for special occupancies, special equipment, special conditions and communication systems, and be able to use the NEC tables to size conduit raceways. As a requirement of this course, students will take the Journeyman Electrical exam for the current code cycle and be responsible for fees associated with the cost of the exam. Please contact the program chair for more information about the Journeyman Electrical exam fees. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

ELTE 225   Industrial Wiring I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 200.

This is an introductory course that covers industrial wiring methods that include practical application and hands-on experience in implementing the code requirements. Transformer installation, power distribution and various wiring methods will also be discussed. The student will explore necessary skills to install electrical systems in an industrial occupancy, meeting the minimum requirements as set forth in the current National Electrical Code (NEC). 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELTE 250   Industrial Wiring II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 225.

This course is a continuation of industrial wiring methods that include practical application and hands-on experience in implementing the code requirements. Motor installation and control, generator installation and various wiring methods will also be discussed. The student will explore necessary skills to install electrical systems in an industrial occupancy, meeting the minimum requirements as set forth in the current National Electrical Code (NEC). 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELTE 271   Electrical Internship* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval.

The internship will provide advanced students the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge with on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals. 1 hr. lecture, minimum 15 hrs. on-the-job training/wk.

ELTE 110

  • Title: AC/DC Circuits*
  • Number: ELTE 110
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

This is an introductory course that addresses the basics of Direct Current (DC) and Alternating Current (AC) circuits. The lab component to this course will expand on concepts taught in lecture by incorporating hands-on projects using common components found in the electrical industry. Students will gain experience in the process of reading and troubleshooting schematic drawings using electrical measuring equipment. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the safety procedures when working with electrical systems.
  2. Explain DC theory concepts.
  3. Describe and apply Ohm’s, Watt’s and Kirchhoff’s Laws.
  4. Define and apply the characteristics of series, parallel and combination circuits.
  5. Explain AC theory concepts.
  6. Perform and interpret electrical measurements using industry standard equipment.
  7. Identify components in an electrical control circuit.
  8. Describe the components and operation of an electric motor.
  9. Interpret an electrical schematic drawing.
  10. Demonstrate the process of electrical troubleshooting.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Procedures

A. Identify the location of the safety rating on safety glasses.

B. Describe the dangers of electricity.

II. DC Theory Concepts

A. Define the law of electrical charges.

B. Describe the characteristics of conductors, insulators and semiconductors.

C. Explain how electromagnetism occurs in a wire.

D. Define Electron Current Flow theory.

E. Describe voltage, resistance, current and power in an electrical circuit.

III. Ohm's, Watt's and Kirchhoff’s Laws

A. Define Ohm’s Law.

B. Define Watt’s Law.

C. Define Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law.

D. Define Kirchhoff’s Current Law.

E. Demonstrate the ability to use the Ohm’s Law formula wheel.

IV. Series, Parallel and Combination Circuits

A. Identify the characteristics of resistance, current, voltage and power in a series circuit.

B. Apply the formulas to solve for resistance, current, voltage and power in a series circuit.

C. Identify the behavior of resistance, current, voltage and power in a parallel circuit.

D. Apply the formulas to solve for resistance, current, voltage and power in a parallel circuit.

E. Describe the process of breaking down a combination circuit.

F. Apply the formulas to solve for resistance, current, voltage and power in a combination circuit.

V. AC Theory Concepts

A. Summarize how AC electricity is produced.

B. List the characteristics of an AC sine wave.

C. Calculate the peak and effective voltage and current of an AC sine wave.

D. Define reactance in an AC circuit.

E. Analyze the effect of reactance on an AC circuit.

F. Define power factor in an AC circuit.

VI. Electrical Measurements

A. Describe the operation of a voltmeter, ammeter and ohmmeter.

B. Use industry standard electrical meters to take readings on an electrical circuit.

VII. Electrical Control Circuit Components

A. Identify the different types of switches in a control circuit.

B. Identify the different types of relays in a control circuit.

C. Describe the operation of a transformer in a control circuit.

VIII. Electric Motor

A. Identify the major components of a motor.

B. Explain the operation of a DC motor.

C. Explain the operation of an AC motor.

D. Describe the process of reversing the rotation of a three-phase motor.

IX. Electrical Schematic Drawing

A. Identify the symbols used to represent components in a control circuit.

B. Predict the operation of a control circuit using the electrical schematic.

C. Demonstrate the operation of a latching circuit.

X. Electrical Troubleshooting Process

A. Demonstrate the steps to troubleshooting an electrical circuit.

B. Identify the testing equipment used to troubleshoot an electrical circuit.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-35%    Chapter Tests
15-25%    Homework
5-15%      Class Participation
25-35%    Lab Assignments
5-15%      Final Exam

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELTE 115

  • Title: Print Reading*
  • Number: ELTE 115
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

This course addresses the fundamentals of interpreting construction drawings. Students learn to read specification manuals and prints as applied to electrical installations in residential, commercial and industrial buildings. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Identify basic layout of drawing set.
  2. Interpret dimensions using scales.
  3. Identify standard electrical symbols and notations.
  4. Identify site plans, floor plans, one line diagrams and detail drawings.
  5. Interpret the content of the specification manual

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Drawing Set Layout

A. Locate and describe the title block area.

B. Identify revisions and notations on a print.

C. Describe the major sections of a full set of project drawings.

II. Scales

A. Locate the print scale in the title block area.

B. Demonstrate the operation of an architect scale ruler.

C. Demonstrate the operation of an engineer scale ruler.

III. Electrical Symbols and Notations

A. Explain the purpose of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

B. Identify the common electrical symbols used in a working drawing.

C. Differentiate between a building line and an electrical wiring path.

D. Explain supplemental notations on a print.

IV. Site Plans, Floor Plans, One-Line Diagrams and Detail Drawings

A. Identify the site plans.

B. Describe the orientation of the building on the site.

C. Locate utility easements on a site plan.

D. Identify the elevations on a site plan.

E. Interpret the symbols used on a floor plan.

F. Explain the reflected ceiling print.

G. Use an architecture elevation print to determine installation height of outlet boxes.

H. Identify the finished floor type in a room.

I. Interpret a one-line diagram.

J. Locate the conduit, conductor and disconnect size on a one-line diagram.

K. Interpret a detail drawing of electrical equipment.

L. Describe the use of a detail drawing.

V. Panel Directories

A. Identify the electrical panel directories.

B. Calculate the load on each busbar of a panelboard.

C. Identify the amperage rating of the panel busbars, main circuit breaker and branch circuit overcurrent protection.

VI. Specification Manual

A. Explain the content and purpose of the specification manual.

B. Describe the electrical division as outlined by the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI).

C. Discuss common responsibilities of an electrical contractor per the specifications.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-35%    Chapter Tests
15-25%    Homework
5-15%      Class Participation
25-35%    Lab Assignments
5-15%      Final Exam

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELTE 122

  • Title: National Electrical Code I*
  • Number: ELTE 122
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELTE 110.

Description:

This is an introductory course on the use and interpretation of the current National Electrical Code (NEC), chapters 1-4. Students will learn the purpose and history of the code; develop a working knowledge of the code requirements for wiring, protection, materials and equipment; and be able to discern between wiring methods used in different occupancies. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explain the purpose, history and layout of the National Electrical Code (NEC).
  2. Interpret and apply the General articles of the NEC.
  3. Interpret and apply the Wiring and Protection articles of the NEC.
  4. Interpret and apply the Wiring Methods and Materials articles of the NEC.
  5. Interpret and apply the Equipment for General Use articles of the NEC.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Purpose, History and Layout

A. Explain the history of National Electrical Code (NEC).

B. Differentiate code changes from previous codes.

C. Explain terms and layout of NEC.

D. Explain which professionals use the NEC.

E. Define the purpose of the NEC.

F. Explain code enforcement.

G. Distinguish between mandatory and explanatory material.

II. General Articles

A. Interpret definitions of the NEC using Article 100.

B. Summarize the NEC requirements for electrical installations using Article 110.

1. Explain the approval of equipment by the authority having jurisdiction.

2. Describe the identification, installation and use of equipment.

3. Explain nominal voltages and wiring methods.

4. Distinguish different conductor insulation and wiring methods.

5. Explain interrupting rating.

6. Explain mechanical execution of work.

7. Describe the mounting of cooling equipment.

8. Explain electrical conductor termination.

9. Define access and working space.

10. Identify the manufacturer markings on electrical equipment.

III. Wiring and Protection Articles

A. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 200, Use and Identification of Grounded Conductors.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Explain the connection to grounded system.

3. Describe the use of the grounded conductor.

4. Explain the use of white or gray conductors.

5. Describe terminal identification and polarity.

B. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 210, Branch Circuits.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Describe branch circuit classification.

3. Explain multiwire branch circuits.

4. Explain color code for branch circuits.

5. Explain voltage limitations and use of receptacles.

6. Describe GFCI receptacle protection.

7. Explain conductor ampacity and overcurrent protection.

8. Calculate outlet device rating and maximum branch circuit loads.

9. Calculate permissible loads and multioutlet branch circuit.

10. Justify the number of dwelling unit receptacle outlets.

11. Explain the requirements of rooftop, attic and crawl space receptacles.

12. Calculate lighting outlet requirements.

C. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 215, Feeders.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Describe the minimum rating and size of feeders.

3. Calculate overcurrent protection.

4. Describe feeder conductor grounding means.

5. Identify feeder high leg.

6. Explain ground-fault protection of equipment.

D. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 220, Branch Circuit, Feeder and Service Calculations.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Explain voltages and computations of loads.

3. Calculate branch circuit requirements.

4. Calculate general lighting demands.

5. Describe commercial receptacle demand factors.

6. Define the term noncoincident.

7. Complete a dwelling unit small appliance and laundry load.

8. Calculate a dwelling unit appliance demand.

9. Calculate a dwelling unit electric clothes dryer demand.

10. Calculate a dwelling unit electric range demand.

11. Explain a non-coincident load.

12. Perform a size calculation of a feeder neutral load.

13. Perform an optional calculation for a dwelling unit.

E. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 225, Outside Branch Circuits and Feeders.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Calculate the loads of an outside branch circuit.

3. Describe conductor covering and minimum size conductors.

4. Explain the use of lighting equipment installed outdoors.

5. Interpret the requirements for more than one building or other structure.

6. Explain the wiring requirements on buildings.

7. Identify the point of attachment and clearances from a building.

8. Describe mechanical protection.

9. Explain why raceways are arranged to drain.

10. Describe underground circuits and use of trees for support.

F. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 230, Services.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Explain the rules for sizing a service.

3. Explain the number of services allowed on a building.

4. Identify the rules for supplying a service to a single building or structure.

5. Identify conductors considered outside a building.

6. Explain service conductors separate from other conductors.

7. Describe raceway seals and clearance from building openings.

8. Calculate overhead conductors size and rating.

9. Identify clearance requirements and points of attachment.

10. Identify the use of service masts as supports for the point of attachment.

11. Describe underground service size and rating.

G. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 240, Overcurrent Protection.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Locate the section on standard ampere ratings.

3. Describe supplementary overcurrent protection.

4. Explain ground fault protection of equipment.

5. Describe the rules for underground conductors.

6. Differentiate between damp and wet location.

7. List the rules for Edison base fuses.

8. List the rules for type S fuses.

9. Describe the use of a circuit breaker.

10. Define series rated equipment.

H. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 250, Grounding and Bonding.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Explain the purpose of grounding.

3. Differentiate between grounding and bonding.

4. Define the term objectionable currents.

5. Explain the rules for service system grounding.

6. Define separately derived system.

7. Describe the different types of grounding electrodes.

8. List the rules for supplemental grounding electrodes.

9. Define maximum resistance to ground.

10. List the requirements for grounding and bonding on the line side of the service.

11. List the requirements for grounding and bonding on the load side of the service.

12. Define hazardous locations.

13. Describe equipment bonding jumpers.

14. List the rules for bonding of piping and building steel.

15. Define a lightning protection system.

16. Describe grounding of ranges and clothes dryers.

17. Explain the rules for bonding receptacles and boxes.

IV. Wiring Methods and Materials Articles

A. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 300, Wiring Methods.

1. Define voltage and temperature limitations.

2. Describe the rules for underground installations.

3. List the rules for securing and supporting.

4. Describe the danger of multiwire branch circuits.

5. Explain length of free conductors.

6. Demonstrate the process of raceway sizing.

7. Explain induced currents in metal parts.

B. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 310, Conductors for General Wiring.

1. Differentiate between stranded and solid conductors.

2. Define the rules for conductors in parallel.

3. Explain insulation temperature limitation.

4. Calculate conductor ampacity using temperature and bundling adjustment factors.

C. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 312, Cabinets, Cutout Boxes and Meter Socket Enclosures.

1. Differentiate between nonmetallic and metal boxes.

2. Define classified location for box installation.

D. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 314, Outlet, Device, Pull and Junction Boxes; Conduit Bodies; Fittings; and Handhole Enclosures.

1. Calculate the number of conductors allowed in a box.

2. Demonstrate the process of sizing a junction box.

3. Calculate the size of a pull box when making an angle pull and a straight pull.

E. Locate the code articles that apply to the installation of raceway materials.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Identify the uses permitted and uses not permitted.

3. Indicate the securing and supporting requirements.

V. Equipment for General Use Articles

A. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 400, Flexible Cords and Cables.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Describe types of flexible cords.

3. Identify allowable ampacities of fixture wire.

B. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 404, Switches.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Describe the role the grounded conductor plays in switching.

3. Explain and identify the markings on a switch.

C. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 406, Receptacles, Cord Connectors and Attachment Plugs.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Describe the general installation and replacement requirements.

3. Compare the installation requirements for wet and dry locations.

D. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 408, Switchboards and Panelboards.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Distinguish between a lighting panelboard and appliance branch circuit panelboard.

3. Describe overcurrent protection of a panelboard.

E. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 410, Luminaires, Lampholders and Lamps.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Describe specified fixture locations.

3. Explain the protection of recessed fixtures.

4. Describe electric discharge lighting.

F. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 422, Appliances.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Identify the branch circuit requirements for an appliance.

3. Explain disconnecting means.

G. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 430, Motors, Motor Circuits and Controllers.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Distinguish between full load current (FLC) and full load amperes (FLA).

3. Describe locked rotor current.

4. Explain disconnecting means.

5. Demonstrate the process of sizing an overload.

6. Demonstrate the process of sizing a branch circuit short circuit and ground fault protection device to a single motor and group of motors.

7. Demonstrate the process of sizing the branch circuit conductors.

8. Demonstrate the process of sizing the feeder conductors.

H. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 450, Transformers and Transformer Vaults.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. List the rules for overcurrent protection on a transformer.

3. Explain ventilation requirements.

4. Size the conductors for the primary side of a transformer.

5. Size the conductors for the secondary side of a transformer.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

35-45%    Chapter Tests
15-25%    Homework
5-15%      Class Participation
25-35%    Final Exam

Total=100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELTE 125

  • Title: Residential Wiring*
  • Number: ELTE 125
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELTE 110 and ELTE 115.

Description:

This course covers residential wiring methods that include practical application and hands-on experience in implementing the code requirements. Installation rules and circuit designs for switches, receptacles, luminaires and appliances will also be discussed. The student will explore necessary skills to install electrical systems in a residential occupancy, meeting the minimum requirements as set forth in the current National Electrical Code (NEC). 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the safety procedures when working with electrical systems.
  2. Describe the scope of an electrical print.
  3. Describe and identify conductor sizes and insulation types.
  4. Identify and install the various types of switches, receptacles and outlet boxes.
  5. Identify the required branch circuits and devices.
  6. Identify and install the various types of luminaires.
  7. Describe branch circuit requirements for appliances.
  8. Explain the types and requirements for fire detection within a dwelling.
  9. Identify the requirements for grounding and bonding within a dwelling.
  10. Identify and install overcurrent, short circuit and ground fault protection.
  11. Calculate requirements for and install a residential service.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Procedures

A. Identify the location of the safety rating on safety glasses.

B. Describe the dangers of electricity.

C. Define arc flash.

D. Describe the function of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

E. Describe the purpose of the National Electrical Code (NEC).

F. Explain the function of Underwriters Laboratories (UL).

II. Electrical Print

A. Identify the common electrical symbols used in a working drawing.

B. Explain the content and purpose of the specifications.

C. Explain the purpose of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

D. Demonstrate the operation of an architect scale ruler.

III. Conductor Sizes and Insulation Types

A. Locate and interpret the NEC table for allowable ampacities for conductors.

B. Describe the American Wire Gauge (AWG) sizing system.

C. Describe the requirements for and install non-metallic sheathed cable.

D. Select the appropriate connectors for non-metallic sheathed cable.

E. Calculate the voltage drop on a branch circuit.

F. Identify the NEC reference for insulation types.

IV. Switches, Receptacles and Outlet Boxes

A. Describe the operation of a single, three-way and four-way toggle switch.

B. Explain the NEC requirements for neutral conductors in a switching circuit.

C. Install a single, three-way and four-way toggle switch and circuit.

D. Describe the operation of a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) device.

E. Describe the operation of an arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) device.

F. Explain the NEC rules for the installation of tamper-resistant devices.

G. Describe the installation of a split wired receptacle device.

H. Install a GFCI, AFCI, tamper-resistant and split-wired device.

I. Explain the NEC rules for replacing an existing receptacle device.

J. Describe the characteristics of a non-metallic outlet box.

K. Choose and install the correct size of an outlet box per NEC calculation requirements.

L. Describe the NEC requirements for spacing receptacle outlets for a dwelling bedroom.

M. Describe the NEC requirements for spacing receptacle outlets for a dwelling kitchen countertop.

N. Install a non-metallic and a metallic outlet box.

V. Required Branch Circuits and Devices

A. Explain the NEC rules for the kitchen countertop branch circuits.

B. Explain the NEC rules for the laundry room branch circuit.

C. Explain the NEC rules for the bathroom branch circuit.

D. Identify the NEC requirements for the installation of GFCI devices.

E. Identify the NEC requirements for the installation of AFCI devices.

VI. Luminaires

A. Identify the NEC requirements for recessed luminaires.

B. Describe the markings on a recessed luminaire.

C. Explain lighting fixture voltage limitations.

D. Determine the maximum length allowed for a luminaire fixture whip.

E. Install a recessed incandescent luminaire.

F. Identify the different ballast types used with fluorescent lamps.

G. Compare the characteristics of incandescent, fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) lamps.

H. Identify the NEC requirements for installing luminaires in clothes closets.

I. Identify the NEC requirements for installing hanging luminaires in bathrooms.

VII. Appliances

A. Identify the symbol for a special-purpose outlet.

B. Explain the NEC requirements for equipment grounding of a dryer.

C. Describe the circuit requirements for a cooking appliance.

D. Calculate the branch circuit demand per the NEC for a cooking appliance.

E. Identify an appliance disconnecting means.

F. Explain noncoincident loads.

G. Describe the NEC rules regarding accessibility of an air conditioner disconnect.

VIII. Fire Detection

A. Discuss the importance of fire detection systems in a dwelling.

B. Identify the types of fire detection devices.

C. Explain the installation requirements for fire detection devices.

IX. Grounding and Bonding

A. Describe the different types of grounding electrodes for a dwelling.

B. Identify the correct size grounding electrode conductor per NEC requirements.

C. Identify the correct size equipment grounding conductor per NEC requirements.

D. Illustrate the connection of the main bonding jumper in a residential panel.

X. Overcurrent, Short Circuit and Ground Fault Protection

A. Identify the maximum overcurrent protection rating for dwelling branch circuits.

B. Identify the standard ampere ratings for overcurrent protection.

C. Describe the conditions of overcurrent.

D. Install a circuit breaker overcurrent device.

E. Discuss the interrupting ratings for fuses and circuit breakers.

F. Explain the NEC requirements for handle ties with a circuit breaker.

XI. Residential Service

A. Calculate the floor area of a dwelling.

B. Determine the demand factors for a general lighting and receptacle load calculation.

C. Choose the correct distribution panel and wire size for a dwelling.

D. Explain the different types of service installations to a dwelling.

E. Locate the NEC requirements for a service mast.

F. Identify clearance requirements for an overhead service.

G. Install a residential service.

H. Terminate a residential distribution panel.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-35%    Chapter Tests
15-25%    Homework
5-15%      Class Participation
25-35%    Lab Assignments
5-15%      Final Exam

Total=100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.  

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELTE 150

  • Title: Solar Electric Systems*
  • Number: ELTE 150
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 125.

Description:

Solar Electric Systems presents the key components of photovoltaic (PV) conversion systems to produce electricity from sunlight. Solar module types and properties, balance of system components, stand-alone and utility interface, energy management and economics for a variety of PV applications are studied. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explain solar phenomena as they apply to energy collection.
  2. Explain the basic components of a photovoltaic (PV) system.
  3. Explain the variables that impact PV system design.
  4. Identify appropriate PV system for application situations.
  5. Evaluate a sample structure to determine appropriate sizing of a PV array.
  6. Design a PV array for a sample structure.
  7. Demonstrate basic and electrical job safety.
  8. Install commercially produced PV rack system.
  9. Install PV cable and conduit.
  10. Exhibit procedures for correct junction and combiner box installation.
  11. Describe the use of solar siting tools, hardware and software.
  12. Diagram a PV system storage battery.
  13. Describe the installation and functions of a charge controller.
  14. Demonstrate the installation of a grid direct PV inverter and disconnect.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Solar Phenomena and Energy Collection

A. Explain sun-earth geometry as it relates to daily and yearly cycles.

B. Calculate the difference between solar time and standard time.

C. Differentiate between solar radiation and irradiance.

D. Diagram the appropriate solar array orientation for a given latitude.

E. Interpret solar radiation data sets.

F. Demonstrate how radiation data is used in sizing and performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems.

G. Discuss current issues in solar energy.

II. PV System Components

A. Demonstrate use of the site survey and equipment.

B. Differentiate between types of collector geometries.

C. Define system components and their use.

1. Microinverters

2. Stand-alone charge controllers, Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT)

3. Grid direct inverters, power conditioning units, MPPT

4. Storage battery sizing and maintenance

5. Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS) methods and other storage systems

D. Explain types of racks, mounts, connectors and combiner methods.

1. Sketch a typical rack and mounting system and label the parts.

2. List and describe module, subarray, and array connection and combiner methods and hardware.

III. PV System Design Variables

A. Collect load and typical use inputs and calculations.

B. Explain the process and function of an energy audit.

C. Explain effect of shading on a given site.

D. Evaluate climate effects on a given site.

E. Evaluate impact of access to solar array.

F. Discuss the impact of ordinances, codes, permitting processes.

G. Outline mechanical considerations of installations.

1. Safety

2. Roof types and issues

3. Space orientation and limitations

4. Grounding hardware and WEEB washers

H. Outline electrical considerations of installations.

1. Safety

2. Grounding

3. Disconnects

4. Battery systems

I. Evaluate sizing methods and calculations.

J. Evaluate utility interface considerations.

1. Physical

2. Legal

IV. PV Systems Applications

A. List the defining characteristics of a standalone system.

B. List the defining characteristics of a grid direct system.

C. List the defining characteristics of a hybrid system.

D. Compare the strengths and weaknesses of each type of system.

V. PV Project Preparation

A. Collect project data for a sample structure.

B. List variables that impact project.

C. Evaluate impact of data collected.

D. Determine the optimum size and type of array.

VI. PV Project Design

A. Design a system for a sample structure.

B. Specify and list components, supplies and hardware for the PV system.

C. Estimate labor and project cost of the project.

D. Evaluate life-cycle cost of the project.

VII. Basic Electrical and Job Safety

A. Demonstrate proper use of Personal Fall Arrest System (PFAS).

B. Demonstrate proper use of tools.

C. Demonstrate proper safety protocols.

VIII. PV Rack Systems

A. Install a commercial rack system on a metal roof.

B. Demonstrate installation of commercial rack system on a composite roof.

C. Diagram a commercial rack system using a ballasted rack.

D. Discuss appropriate roof jacks applicable to each of the roof systems.

IX. PV Cable and Conduit

A. Calculate proper cable sizing protocol.

B. Describe correct installation of cable systems.

C. Sketch and describe conduit installation.

1. Bending and installing electrical conduit

2. Installing flexible metallic conduit

3. Installing flexible nonmetallic conduit

D. Demonstrate proper wire and cable installation including grounding hardware and WEEB washers.

X. Junction and Combiner Box Installation

A. Exhibit correct installation of junction hardware.

1. Module junction boxes and connections

2. Industry standard connectors and multijunction connections

B. Model the installation of combiner boxes.

1. Sizing of hardware

2. Placement of hardware

3. Weatherproofing of hardware

XI. Solar Siting Tools, Hardware and Software

A. Demonstrate use of commercial siting tools, hardware and software.

1. Analog tools

2. Electronic tools

B. Describe siting procedures without use of commercial tools, hardware and software.

XII. Storage Battery System

A. Diagram a multimodule, single series string storage battery.

B. Diagram the installation of a multimodule, multiseries/parallel string storage battery.

C. Describe the installation of battery isolation hardware.

D. Demonstrate the function of manual and automatic transfer switches.

E. Calculate appropriate set points for charge algorithm for various chemistry and sizes of modules.

XIII. Charge Controllers

A. Discuss the use of set points on simple charge controller.

B. Demonstrate use of set points on Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT) and associated charge controller.

XIV. PV System Inverter

A. Describe the differences in hardware and operation between standalone and grid direct PV systems.

B. Demonstrate procedures to mechanically and electrically install grid direct inverter, including string inverters and microinverters.

C. Describe installation and use of system isolation hardware.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-35%    Chapter Tests
15-25%    Homework
5-15%      Class Participation
25-35%    Lab Assignments
5-15%      Final Exam

TOTAL 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELTE 175

  • Title: Low Voltage Wiring*
  • Number: ELTE 175
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 200.

Description:

This course covers the basic theory, installation standards and code requirements for various low voltage systems and their connecting devices. Discussion of closed circuit television, security, telephone, fire alarm, computer networking and wireless systems will be incorporated with hands-on experience installing and terminating conductors and cables in a lab environment. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the safety procedures when working with electrical systems.
  2. Discuss the characteristics of low voltage conductors and cables.
  3. Identify the installation techniques used in networking technology.
  4. Summarize the National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements for classifying low voltage circuits.
  5. Examine the components of a fire alarm system.
  6. Discuss the characteristics of a telecommunication system.
  7. Examine the components of a security system and access-control system.
  8. Summarize the fundamentals of wireless communications.
  9. Examine the components of a closed-circuit television (CCTV) camera system.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Procedures

A. Identify the location of the safety rating on safety glasses.

B. Describe the dangers of electricity.

C. Describe the purpose of the National Electrical Code.

D. Explain the function of Underwriters Laboratories (UL).

E. Explain the purpose of grounding electrical systems.

II. Conductors and Cables

A. Discuss the use of cable shielding.

B. Describe the electrical properties of cables.

C. Identify and terminate multiconductor cable and connectors.

1. Twisted pair

2. Category rated

3. Coaxial

D. Discuss the characteristics of fiber-optic cable.

E. Identify and install fiber-optic cable and connectors.

III. Networking Technology

A. Compare a wide area network (WAN) with a local area network (LAN).

B. Categorize the cabling used to send data between multiple points in a network.

C. Identify the techniques used when installing network cable.

IV. Circuit Classifications

A. Explain the difference between remote-control, signaling and power-limited circuits.

B. Define class 1, 2 and 3 circuits.

C. Describe the NEC overcurrent protection requirements for class 1 circuits.

D. Explain the NEC power source requirements for class 2 and 3 circuits.

E. Identify the techniques used when installing class 1, 2 or 3 circuits.

F. Define the separation requirements among class 1, 2 and 3 circuits.

V. Fire Alarm Systems

A. Summarize the various types of fire alarm systems and components.

B. Identify an alarm initiating device.

C. Identify an alarm indicating device.

D. Explain the difference between class A and B fire alarm circuits.

E. Explain the NEC power source requirements for a power and non-power limited system.

F. Illustrate the basic design guidelines of a fire alarm system.

VI. Telecommunication Systems

A. Define the characteristics of a telephone system.

B. Describe the basic components of a residential telephone system.

C. Identify common types of signaling used by the telephone company.

D. Identify the types of terminations and color codes used in telecommunications.

E. Describe the NEC requirements for telecommunication system installation.

VII. Security and Access-Control Systems

A. Describe the basic components of a security alarm system.

B. Identify the different types of sensors used in a security alarm system.

C. Describe the basic components of an access-control system.

D. Identify the different types of locking mechanisms used in an access-control system.

VIII. Wireless Communications

A. Describe the fundamentals of wireless communications.

B. Identify the basic components of a wireless system.

C. Explain the function of wireless antennas.

D. Summarize the principles of cellular communications.

E. Explain the NEC requirements for radio and television equipment installation.

IX. CCTV Camera Systems

A. Describe the components of a CCTV system.

B. Determine what type of camera to use in a specific environment.

C. Calculate field of view and distance for a camera.

D. Describe the difference between analog and digital recording devices.

E. Explain the NEC requirements for CCTV installation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-35%    Chapter Tests
15-25%    Homework
5-15%      Class Participation
25-35%    Lab Assignments
5-15%      Final Exam

TOTAL 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELTE 200

  • Title: Commercial Wiring*
  • Number: ELTE 200
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 110 and ELTE 115.

Description:

This course covers commercial wiring methods that include practical application and hands-on experience in implementing the code requirements. Conduit hand bending techniques, conductor sizing and various wiring methods will also be discussed. The student will explore necessary skills to install electrical systems in a commercial occupancy, meeting the minimum requirements as set forth in the current National Electrical Code (NEC). 3 hrs. lecture/wk, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the safety procedures when working with electrical systems.
  2. Apply the requirements of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70E.
  3. Describe the scope of an electrical print.
  4. Perform conduit hand bending.
  5. Demonstrate the process of raceway sizing.
  6. Demonstrate the process of outlet and junction box sizing.
  7. Identify and install conductors.
  8. Identify the various types of feeder and branch circuit wiring methods.
  9. Explain the types of fire detection systems.
  10. Identify the requirements for grounding and bonding.
  11. Identify the components of commercial distribution equipment.
  12. Perform a commercial service load calculation.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Procedures

A. Identify the location of the safety rating on safety glasses.

B. Describe the dangers of electricity.

C. Define arc flash.

D. Describe the function of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

E. Describe the purpose of the National Electrical Code.

F. Explain the function of Underwriters Laboratories (UL).

II. NFPA 70E

A. Define the purpose of the NFPA 70E.

B. Define the term qualified person.

C. Apply the provisions of the code to achieve an electrically safe working condition.

III. Electrical Print

A. Identify the common electrical symbols used in a working drawing.

B. Explain the content and purpose of the specifications.

C. Explain the purpose of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

D. Demonstrate the operation of an architect scale ruler.

IV. Conduit Hand Bending

A. Demonstrate the process of using a hand bender.

B. Describe the use of the arrow, star, rim notch and degree markings on a hand bender.

C. Perform a stub and back-to-back bend using a hand bender.

D. Define the terms take up and gain.

E. Perform an offset, 4-point and 3-point saddle using a hand bender.

F. Define the term shrinkage.

G. Perform a box offset using a hand bender.

V. Raceway Sizing

A. Determine the allowable conductor percent fill for a cross section of conduit.

B. Determine the dimensions per percent area for a cross section of conduit.

C. Determine the dimensions for a cross section of insulated conductor.

D. Locate the informative Annex Raceway Fill Tables in the NEC.

VI. Outlet and Junction Box Sizing

A. Determine the minimum volume capacity of an outlet box.

B. Determine the volume allowance required per conductor.

C. Determine the volume allowance required per device.

D. Calculate the size of a junction box when used for a straight pull.

E. Calculate the size of a junction box when used for an angle pull.

VII. Conductors

A. Locate and interpret the NEC table for allowable ampacities for conductors.

B. Explain the bundling and ambient temperature derating process for conductor ampacity.

C. Describe the American Wire Gauge (AWG) sizing system.

D. Calculate the voltage drop on a branch circuit.

E. Identify the NEC reference for insulation types.

F. Describe the operation of fish tape.

G. Install single conductors in a conduit system.

VIII. Wiring Methods

A. Describe the difference between set screw and compression connections.

B. Identify the NEC requirements for flexible metallic conduit.

C. Discuss the uses permitted and not permitted for electrical metallic tubing.

D. Identify the NEC requirements for supporting electrical metallic tubing.

E. Describe the requirements for and install metal clad cable.

F. Select the appropriate connectors for metal clad cable.

IX. Fire Detection

A. Discuss the importance of fire detection systems.

B. Identify the types of fire detection indicating devices.

C. Identify the types of fire detection notification devices.

X. Grounding and Bonding

A. Describe the different types of grounding electrodes.

B. Identify the correct size grounding electrode conductor per NEC requirements.

C. Identify the correct size equipment grounding conductor per NEC requirements.

D. Illustrate the connection of the main bonding jumper in a distribution panel.

XI. Distribution Equipment

A. Describe the operation of a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) device.

B. Locate the NEC requirements for the installation of GFCI protection.

C. Identify the standard ampere ratings for overcurrent protection.

D. Choose the correct size branch circuit overcurrent protection for a continuous and noncontinuous load.

E. Describe the conditions of overcurrent.

F. Discuss the interrupting ratings for fuses and circuit breakers.

G. Explain the NEC requirements for handle ties with a circuit breaker.

H. Determine the phase arrangement for a particular circuit number.

I. Describe the operation of a dry type transformer.

XII. Service Load Calculation

A. Calculate the floor area and volt-amps per square foot used for the lighting load.

B. Determine the load per outlet for receptacles and multioutlet assemblies.

C. Determine the load per outlet for sign lighting and show window lighting.

D. Identify the lighting load demand factors.

E. Calculate the service entrance feeder wire size.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-35%    Chapter Tests
15-25%    Homework
5-15%      Class Participation
25-35%    Lab Assignments
5-15%      Final Exam

TOTAL 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELTE 202

  • Title: Electrical Estimating*
  • Number: ELTE 202
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 115.

Description:

This course covers the process of estimating the cost of an electrical design. Students will learn to develop an electrical estimate for a residential and commercial design. Emphasis will be placed on compiling a take-off list of materials from blueprints, determining material and labor cost, writing bid proposals and creating change orders. 2 hrs. lecture/wk, 3 hrs lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Define the duties and responsibilities of the electrical estimator.
  2. Describe the different types of bids.
  3. Explain the components of an electrical estimate.
  4. Complete the steps for a bid.
  5. Complete a manual estimate of a residential single-family dwelling using spreadsheet software.
  6. Complete an estimate for a commercial wiring project using industry standard software.
  7. Write a bid proposal and a change order.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Duties and Responsibilities of the Electrical Estimator

A. Describe the process of determining the estimated cost of the job.

B. Describe the process for purchasing material for the job.

C. Describe the bid accuracy process.

D. Define project management.

II. Types of Bids

A. Describe a competitive bid.

B. Describe a design-build bid.

C. Describe a negotiated work bid.

D. Define multiple bid proposal methods.

E. Describe a unit pricing bid.

III. Components of an Electrical Estimate

A. Explain the scope of the work.

1. Interpret the symbols on a blueprint

2. Explain the use and conditions of the specifications

B. Complete a material take-off.

1. Compile a list of materials from a set of blueprint symbols

2. Coordinate a list of materials from the specifications

3. Coordinate a list of materials from shop drawings

C. Complete a bill of material.

1. Create a bill of material manually from the take-off

2. Create a computer-assisted bill of material from the take-off

D. Compile a pricing list for labor and material.

1. Determine the price of materials manually

2. Determine the price of materials with computer-related software

3. Complete a working model of a labor-unit

E. Complete an extending and totaling process.

1. Calculate a material cost extension

2. Calculate the labor-hour extension

F. Complete an estimate summary.

1. Calculate the adjustments for labor-hours based on the working conditions

2. Determine the general conditions for additional labor requirements

3. Calculate the total labor cost

4. Calculate the labor burden

5. Calculate the total material cost

6. Determine the direct job expenses

7. Calculate the estimated prime cost

8. Calculate the overhead

IV. Bid Process

A. Determine a reasonable profit, to include:

1. Competition and the economy

2. Management

3. Job size

4. Risk

B. Determine miscellaneous costs, to include:

1. Allowances and contingencies

2. Back-charges

3. Bonds

4. Completion penalty

5. Finance cost

6. Gross receipts or net profit tax

7. Inspector problems

8. Retainer cost

C. Complete a bid-accuracy analysis, to include:

1. Cost distribution

2. Cost per square foot

3. Labor analysis

V. Residential Electrical Estimate, Manual

A. Determine the scope of work.

B. Prepare a take-off of materials from a residential blueprint.

C. Prepare the bill of material.

D. Calculate the pricing, labor, extending and totaling.

E. Create an estimate summary worksheet that includes:

1. Total labor-hours

2. Labor cost

3. Adjusted material cost

4. Direct job cost

5. Estimated prime cost

6. Overhead

7. Estimated cost and bid price

F. Perform a bid analysis.

VI. Commercial Electrical Estimate, Computer Assisted

A. Determine the scope of work.

B. Input the take-off quantities into the computer software.

C. Verify the bill of material on the computer program.

D. Input the estimate summary.

E. Perform a bid analysis.

VII. Bid Proposal for an Electrical Commercial Estimate

A. Explain the acceptance of the proposal.

B. Complete a change order.

C. Explain the use of exclusions.

D. Determine any fixtures and equipment supplied by others.

E. Describe the installation practices by the electrical contractor.

F. Determine the national and local codes to be followed.

G. Define a non-compete clause.

H. Determine the payment schedule and its terms.

I. Determine a performance construction schedule.

J. Determine the selling price of the bid.

K. Complete a detailed scope of work.

L. Explain all temporary wiring needed.

M. Explain the termination of agreement.

N. Explain the warranty.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-35%    Chapter Tests
15-25%    Homework
5-15%      Class Participation
25-35%    Lab Assignments
5-15%      Final Exam

TOTAL    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELTE 222

  • Title: National Electrical Code II*
  • Number: ELTE 222
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 122.

Description:

This course is a continuation of the National Electrical Code I course on the use and interpretation of the current National Electrical Code (NEC), chapters 5-9. Students will develop a working knowledge of the code requirements for special occupancies, special equipment, special conditions and communication systems, and be able to use the NEC tables to size conduit raceways. As a requirement of this course, students will take the Journeyman Electrical exam for the current code cycle and be responsible for fees associated with the cost of the exam. Please contact the program chair for more information about the Journeyman Electrical exam fees. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Interpret and apply the special occupancies articles of the National Electrical Code (NEC).
  2. Interpret and apply the special equipment articles of the NEC.
  3. Interpret and apply the special conditions articles of the NEC.
  4. Interpret and apply the communications systems articles of the NEC.
  5. Interpret and apply the tables of the NEC.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Special Occupancies Articles

A. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 500, Hazardous Locations.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Define the three types of classified hazardous locations.

3. Explain the difference between a Division 1 and a Division 2 condition.

4. Identify the material group (A through G) classifications.

5. Describe the wiring methods required for each class of hazardous location.

6. Explain the difference between explosion-proof and ignition-proof.

7. Explain the use of conduit seals.

8. Explain the National Electrical Code (NEC) rules for grounding and bonding in hazardous locations.

B. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 511, Commercial Garages, Repair and Storage.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Summarize the classifications within a major repair garage.

C. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 514, Motor Fuel Dispensing Facilities.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Summarize the classifications within a fuel-dispensing facility.

D. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 517, Health Care Facilities.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. List the rules for grounding of equipment in patient areas.

3. Identify a hospital-grade receptacle device.

E. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 550, Mobile Homes, Manufactured Homes and Mobile Home Parks.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. List the rules for ground-fault protection of receptacle outlets.

3. List the rules for arc-fault protection of outlets.

4. Perform a service load calculation.

F. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 590, Temporary Installations.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Explain time constraints.

3. List the rules for ground-fault protection of personnel.

II. Special Equipment Articles

A. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 600, Electric Signs and Outline Lighting.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Summarize the branch circuit and disconnect requirements.

3. List the rules for equipment grounding and bonding.

B. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 620, Elevators, Escalators and Moving Walks.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Define the rules for branch circuit wiring in machine room spaces.

3. Define the rules for branch circuit wiring in a hoist way pit.

4. Describe the requirements for the elevator disconnecting means.

5. List the rules for ground-fault protection of personnel.

C. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 625, Electric Vehicle Charging System.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Summarize the overcurrent protection and disconnect requirements.

D. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 680, Swimming Pools and Fountains.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. List the overhead conductor clearance requirements.

3. Summarize the branch circuit and disconnect requirements.

4. Discuss equipotential bonding.

5. List the rules for ground-fault protection of receptacle outlets.

III. Special Conditions Articles

A. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 700, Emergency Systems.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Identify the requirements for branch circuit wiring.

3. Discuss the required sources of power.

B. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 725, Remote Control, Signaling and Power Limited Circuits.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Define the circuit requirements for Class 1, 2, and 3 remote-control circuits.

3. Distinguish the difference between Class 1 power sources and Class 2 and 3 power sources.

4. Explain the rules for separation from other power systems.

5. Explain the listing and marking requirements for Class 2 and Class 3 cables.

C. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 760, Fire Alarm Systems.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Discuss the rules for fire alarm circuit identification.

3. Describe the requirements for non-power-limited fire alarm circuits (NPLFA).

4. Describe the requirements for power-limited fire alarm circuits (PLFA).

IV. Communications Systems Articles

A. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 800, Communication Circuits.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Describe the grounding and bonding requirements.

3. Discuss the installation methods within buildings.

B. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 810, Radio and Television Equipment.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Discuss the clearance required when installing an antenna system.

3. Describe the grounding and bonding requirements.

C. Interpret and apply the rules of Article 820, Community Antenna Television and Radio Distribution Systems.

1. Explain the scope and definitions.

2. Discuss the installation methods when entering buildings.

3. Describe the grounding and bonding requirements.

4. Discuss the installation methods within buildings.

V. Tables

A. Demonstrate the process of raceway sizing using the tables 1, 4, and 5.

B. Identify the direct current resistance of copper using table 8

C. Identify the alternating current resistance of copper using table 9

D. Calculate voltage drop on a feeder circuit.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

35-45%    Chapter Tests
15-25%    Homework
5-15%      Class Participation
25-35%    Final Exam

TOTAL    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

  1.  The student is responsible for fees associate with the Journeyman Electrical exam.

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELTE 225

  • Title: Industrial Wiring I*
  • Number: ELTE 225
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 200.

Description:

This is an introductory course that covers industrial wiring methods that include practical application and hands-on experience in implementing the code requirements. Transformer installation, power distribution and various wiring methods will also be discussed. The student will explore necessary skills to install electrical systems in an industrial occupancy, meeting the minimum requirements as set forth in the current National Electrical Code (NEC). 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the safety procedures when working with electrical systems.
  2. Identify the characteristics of three-phase power.
  3. Describe the operation of an electrical transformer.
  4. Explain the National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements for installation of an electrical transformer.
  5. Explain the effect of transformer impedance on an electrical system.
  6. Explain the installation requirements for electrical busway.
  7. Perform rigid conduit bending using industry standard equipment.
  8. Perform rigid conduit threading using industry standard equipment.
  9. Describe the wiring methods used in hazardous locations.
  10. Classify panelboards and overcurrent protection by their electrical characteristics.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Procedures

A. Identify the location of the safety rating on safety glasses.

B. Describe the dangers of electricity.

C. Define arc flash.

D. Describe the different categories for arc flash Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).

E. Describe the function of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

F. Describe the purpose of the National Electrical Code (NEC).

G. Explain the function of Underwriters Laboratories (UL).

II. Three-Phase Power

A. Describe a wye connected transformer.

B. Describe a delta connected transformer.

C. Calculate phase and line voltage and current.

III. Transformer Operation

A. Explain mutual inductance.

B. Identify the primary and secondary windings.

C. Verify with an ohmmeter the high voltage and low voltage section of a transformer.

D. Differentiate between a single phase and three phase transformer.

E. Define turns ratio.

IV. Transformer Installation

A. Describe the markings on a transformer nameplate.

B. Identify the NEC requirements for transformer overcurrent protection.

C. Identify the NEC requirements for transformer ventilation.

D. Define separately derived system.

E. Identify the NEC requirements for grounding a transformer.

F. Install a single phase and three phase transformer.

V. Impedance

A. Calculate the impedance for a given transformer.

B. Calculate the available fault current for a given transformer.

VI. Busway

A. Differentiate between a feeder, plug and trolley busway.

B. Explain the NEC requirements for the installation of busway.

C. Install a circuit breaker cubicle in a plug in busway.

D. Verify busway insulation resistance using a megohmmeter.

VII. Conduit Bending

A. Identify the NEC requirements for the installation of rigid metallic conduit (RMC).

B. Demonstrate the operation of a mechanical conduit bender.

C. Demonstrate the operation of an electrical conduit bender.

D. Demonstrate the operation of a hydraulic conduit bender.

E. Calculate the measurements for a stub, offset and kick bends.

F. Define gain and shrinkage in conduit bending.

VIII. Conduit Threading

A. Describe the different types of pipe threads.

B. Demonstrate the operation of a hand threading tool.

C. Demonstrate the operation of an electrical threading machine.

IX. Hazardous Location Wiring Methods

A. Identify the types of hazardous locations listed in the NEC.

B. Describe intrinsically safe circuits and equipment.

C. Describe the installation of explosion-proof equipment.

D. Explain the NEC requirements for seals.

X. Panelboards and Overcurrent Protection

A. Differentiate between a power and lighting panelboard.

B. Describe the busbar arrangement on a three phase panelboard.

C. Perform a panelboard load calculation for an industrial building.

D. Demonstrate the process of sizing overcurrent protection.

E. Identify the interrupting current rating for an overcurrent device.

F. Describe time-current characteristic for an overcurrent device.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-35%    Chapter Tests
15-25%    Homework
5-15%      Class Participation
25-35%    Lab Assignments
5-15%      Final Exam

TOTAL    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELTE 250

  • Title: Industrial Wiring II*
  • Number: ELTE 250
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 225.

Description:

This course is a continuation of industrial wiring methods that include practical application and hands-on experience in implementing the code requirements. Motor installation and control, generator installation and various wiring methods will also be discussed. The student will explore necessary skills to install electrical systems in an industrial occupancy, meeting the minimum requirements as set forth in the current National Electrical Code (NEC). 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the safety procedures when working with electrical systems.
  2. Describe the operation of electric motors.
  3. Explain the NEC requirements for installation of an electric motor.
  4. Identify the components of a motor control system.
  5. Install and explain a motor control circuit.
  6. Define power factor and power factor correction.
  7. Describe the operation of electric generators.
  8. Explain the NEC requirements for installation of an electric generator.
  9. Demonstrate the process of troubleshooting a motor control circuit.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Procedures

A. Identify the location of the safety rating on safety glasses.

B. Describe the dangers of electricity.

C. Define arc flash.

D. Describe the function of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

E. Describe the purpose of the National Electrical Code (NEC).

F. Explain the function of Underwriters Laboratories (UL).

II. Motor Operation

A. Identify the rotor and stator of a motor.

B. Distinguish between a wound rotor and a squirrel-cage rotor.

C. Describe the characteristics of a single-phase motor.

D. Describe the characteristics of a three-phase motor.

E. Identify the terminals for a three-phase motor.

F. Calculate the torque and synchronous speed of a motor.

G. Describe the markings on a motor nameplate.

H. Describe the operation of a direct current motor.

I. Install a dual voltage motor.

III. Motor Installation

A. Distinguish between full load current (FLC) and full load amperes (FLA).

B. Describe locked rotor current.

C. Explain disconnecting means.

D. Demonstrate the process of sizing an overload.

E. Demonstrate the process of sizing a branch circuit, short circuit and ground fault protection device to a single motor and group of motors.

F. Demonstrate the process of sizing the branch circuit conductors.

G. Demonstrate the process of sizing the feeder conductors.

IV. Motor Control Components

A. Identify a motor starter.

B. Describe motor overload protection.

C. Identify the different types of switches and relays in a control circuit.

D. Demonstrate the operation of a variable frequency drive.

E. Describe the operation of a transformer in a control circuit.

F. Explain different starting methods for motors.

V. Motor Control Circuit

A. Match the electrical components in a control circuit to their schematic symbols.

B. Design a schematic drawing of a latching circuit.

C. Explain how to reverse a single- and three-phase motor.

D. Predict the operation of a control circuit using the electrical schematic.

E. Install a motor control circuit.

F. Identify the NEC requirements for control circuits.

VI. Power Factor

A. Calculate the inductive reactance of a circuit.

B. Explain the effect of inductive reactance on an industrial electrical system.

C. Define the term power factor.

D. Differentiate between true power and apparent power.

E. Calculate the capacitive reactance of a circuit.

F. Explain the process of correcting power factor.

G. Explain how to size conductors for a capacitor.

VII. Generator Operation

A. Explain the basic operation of a generator.

B. Distinguish between the characteristics of a generator and an alternator.

C. Explain the uses of brushes and commutators in generators.

D. Differentiate between single-phase and three-phase output power.

VIII. Generator Installation

A. Identify the NEC requirements for generator installation.

B. Calculate the overcurrent protection and conductor size for a generator.

C. Describe the NEC requirements for generator grounding.

D. Explain the operation of a generator transfer switch.

IX. Troubleshooting

A. Discuss the steps to troubleshooting a motor control circuit.

B. Identify the testing equipment used to troubleshoot a control circuit.

C. Measure the resistance of a motor winding using a multimeter.

D. Measure the capacitance of a capacitor.

E. Verify motor winding insulation resistance using a megohmmeter.

F. Demonstrate the operation of a power factor meter.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-35%    Chapter Tests
15-25%    Homework
5-15%      Class Participation
25-35%    Lab Assignments
5-15%      Final Exam

TOTAL    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELTE 271

  • Title: Electrical Internship*
  • Number: ELTE 271
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 16
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

The internship will provide advanced students the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge with on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals. 1 hr. lecture, minimum 15 hrs. on-the-job training/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a mature and professional attitude toward employment.
  2. Identify the steps in the job search process.
  3. Compose a resume and cover letter.
  4. Evaluate a job application.
  5. Demonstrate proper conduct during a job interview.
  6. Collaborate productively with customers and co-workers.
  7. Identify ways to deal with termination of employment.
  8. Understand current labor standards.
  9. Evaluate the effectiveness of new industry products.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Employment Attitude

A. Schedule appointments with program facilitator.

B. Manage work schedule with employment supervisor.

C. Prepare program documents to be submitted in a timely manner.

II. Job Search

A. Describe three sources for searching jobs.

B. Identify work opportunities in the program field.

III. Resume and Cover Letter

A. Identify templates and aides for resume writing.

B. Compose a cover letter.

C. Compose a resume.

IV. Job Application

A. Collect job applications from various employment fields.

B. Evaluate the data that is required for various job applications.

V. Job Interview

A. Discuss various tactics for good interview performance.

B. Role-play a job interview.

VI. Customers and Co-Workers

A. Compare labor relations with human relations.

B. Explain best practices when working with customers.

VII. Employment Termination

A. Speculate a reaction to being faced with employment termination.

B. Describe how to avoid being terminated from a job.

VIII. Labor Standards

A. Examine a U.S. employment law.

B. Describe how labor standards affect the workplace.

IX. New Industry Products

A. Select three industry products new to the marketplace.

B. Compare labor savings with product cost.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50%    240 hours of on-the-job training
10%    Employer evaluations
5%      Self evaluation
25%    Homework assignments
10%    Meeting attendance

Total=100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. A minimum average of 15 hours per week on-the-job training is required. Students are expected to keep the instructor informed about progress and any job changes. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).