Journalism/Media Communication (JOUR)

Courses

JOUR 120   Mass Media and Society (3 Hours)  

Each of us is exposed to and affected by the mass media on a daily basis. This course is designed to increase students' awareness of the various media and media's impact on their daily beliefs, opinions, decisions and goals. As a result, students will become more media literate and astute critics of media messages. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 120H   HON: Mass Media and Society* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

JOUR 122   News Writing and Reporting (3 Hours)

News Writing and Reporting prepares students who want to gain basic news-gathering and reporting skills across print, broadcast and online media platforms. Interviewing, researching and story writing under strict deadlines provide students with strong experiences in the storytelling process. News writing and style principles will be gained through stories produced for campus student media. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 122H   HON: News Writing and Reporting* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

JOUR 125   Fundamentals of Advertising (3 Hours)

Fundamentals of Advertising introduces the student to the contemporary advertising process. Research, planning, creativity, production and media scheduling are discussed, along with individual mediums and their forms, functions and roles in society. Major emphasis is placed on advertising and integrated marketing research, planning and creativity. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 125H   HON: Fundamentals of Advertising* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

JOUR 127   Introduction to Broadcasting (3 Hours)

This course serves students interested in gaining a greater understanding of broadcast and emerging technologies. Class time includes discussion of trends and issues, including regulations, ethics, news and information, and audience ratings. Productions in the college's student media facilities offer opportunities to experience and further evaluate their relationship to broadcast and related electronic media. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 130   Principles of Public Relations (3 Hours)

This course is intended to provide the student with an overview of the history, principles and real-life functions of public relations. Public relations is a rapidly growing field. The ability to communicate well with the public is essential in business, education, health care and numerous other fields. This course is designed to give students the background to develop their PR skills. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 145   Photojournalism (3 Hours)

This course is designed to meet the photographic needs of journalism students. It provides a journalistic approach to the concepts and application of photography for multimedia. Students will use cameras, computers and software to master the issues, concepts and constraints involved in creating images for a broad range of media. They will prepare and format digitized image files for storage and transmission, and print and Web-based reproduction. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 202   Broadcast Performance (3 Hours)

Students will learn how to improve their speaking voices and body language as well as the techniques necessary to effectively communicate messages through basic announcing skills. Interviewing, radio and television news, and commercial announcing are some of the topics covered in this course, which will allow students to polish their skills through performances in the college's television studio and on campus media. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 207   Radio Production (3 Hours)

This course provides students with the fundamentals of Internet radio production. The goal is to teach students basic techniques in audio console functions, program formats, and editing using computer software. Writing, producing, and performing are included. Students will gain hands-on experience through exposure to the campus radio station, ECAV. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 220   International Media (3 Hours)

The globalization of media has created a necessity to understand the complex media systems established overseas. These systems exert influence over the cultural, political and economic climate in the world's industrialized nations. Students in this course will learn about the history, interconnectivity, technological innovations and controversies surrounding media systems from a diverse selection of countries. Special emphasis in this course will be placed on the understanding of global journalism. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 222   Advanced Reporting* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: JOUR 122.

This course is designed to sharpen the discernment, critical thinking and writing skills of student journalists. Specific English language rules and principles plus AP news writing style will be emphasized in the production of incisive, well-defined features, profiles, reviews, editorials and personal columns. Professional writings in various media will be examined and critiqued. Class members will have the opportunity to participate in hands-on video shooting and editing of a news story package. Students will gain additional experience by participating in news events, as well as interacting with area media professionals. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 225   Promotional Writing* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: JOUR 125 or JOUR 130.

Students will study copywriting for promotional purposes, starting with an understanding of the target audience. Emphasis is on writing ads for print, radio and television; direct mail and direct response; the web; and new genres. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 227   Basic Video Production (3 Hours)

This course provides students with the fundamentals of video production. The goal is to teach students basic video techniques. Topics covered include technology, lighting, camera operations, audio and editing. Students will gain hands-on experience in the college's Media Production Services Department. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 242   Advanced Broadcast Performance: TV* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: JOUR 202.

Students will produce news, feature, sports, and interview programming for airing on the college's cable station, video server, and social networks. The development of news stories will be included in hands-on activities throughout the course. Learning composure, focus, and detail in a team information-gathering operation will be emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 247   Advanced Video Production* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: JOUR 227.

Students will direct, produce, and edit programming for distribution via the college's media outlets. Students will develop the technical skills involved in both studio production and field production as well as advanced skills in camera operations, multi-camera directing, lighting, audio production, and graphics. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 252   Advanced Broadcast Performance II: TV* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: JOUR 242.

This course builds upon the skills learned in the Advanced Broadcast Performance course. Students will produce news, features, sports, and interview programming for airing on the college's cable station, video server, and social networks. The development of news packages, event reporting, and extended coverage of campus events will be included in hands-on activities throughout the course. Learning composure, focus, and detail in a team information-gathering operation will be emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 257   Advanced Video Production II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: JOUR 247.

This course builds upon the Advanced Video Production course. Students will direct, produce, and edit programming for distribution via the college's media outlets. They will enhance their advanced technical skills involved in both studio production and field production as well as advanced skills in camera operations, multi-camera directing, lighting, audio production, and graphics. The development of writing for media programming will also be emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 267   Advanced Video Production III* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: JOUR 257.

This course continues the advancement of technical skills offered in Advanced Video Production II. Enhancement of skills includes program production of electronic student media. Application of technical skills in studio and field production, multi-camera directing, lighting, audio production and graphics will evolve through hands-on training. Advanced work in writing for student media programming is emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

JOUR 269   Journalism Internship* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval; completion of 3 credit hours in journalism/ media communications course at JCCC or other college with a grade of C or higher.

A journalism/media internship allows students to gain work experience at an approved training center under staff supervision. Emphasis is on learning new skills related to a particular program or department at a media facility. Students may learn the application of writing and production techniques needed to produce video and broadcast news, produce advertising, or public relations promotional copy. On-the-job training includes a minimum of 60 hrs. for the semester by arrangement.

JOUR 270   Journalism Internship* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval; completion of 3 credit hours in journalism/ media communications course at JCCC or other college with a grade of C or higher.

A journalism/media internship allows students to gain work experience at an approved training center under staff supervision. Emphasis is on learning new skills related to a particular program or department at a media facility. Students may learn the application of writing and production techniques needed to produce video and broadcast news, produce advertising, or public relations promotional copy. On-the-job training includes a minimum of 120 hrs. for the semester by arrangement.

JOUR 271   Journalism Internship* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval; completion of six credit hours in journalism/media communications at JCCC or another college with a grade of "C" or higher in those 6 hours.

A journalism/media internship allows students to gain work experience at an approved training center under staff supervision. Emphasis is on learning new skills related to a particular program or department at a media facility. Students may learn the application of writing techniques needed to produce and broadcast news, and produce advertising or public relations promotional copy. On-the-job training involves approximately 15-20 hrs./wk. by arrangement.

JOUR 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

JOUR 120

  • Title: Mass Media and Society
  • Number: JOUR 120
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Each of us is exposed to and affected by the mass media on a daily basis. This course is designed to increase students' awareness of the various media and media's impact on their daily beliefs, opinions, decisions and goals. As a result, students will become more media literate and astute critics of media messages. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the history and development of the mass media in a changing world.
  2. Analyze the various media, comparing depth, style and focus.
  3. Describe the relationship of media to individuals and society.
  4. Recognize the informative and persuasive aspects of the mass media.
  5. Discuss the legal and ethical considerations involved in reaching mass audiences.
  6. Distinguish between credible and distorted media.
  7. Identify specific media issues and controversies.
  8. Develop critical thinking and reasoning skills.
  9. Establish positive mass media reading, listening and viewing habits.
  10. Describe the value of the media in determining life and career choices.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Comprehend the Role of Media in a Changing World

A. Recognize the necessity of becoming media-literate.

1. Appreciate the importance of media criticism in assessing media effects on individuals

2. Discover the various uses of media in career preparation

B. Identify the various elements of communication as they apply to the mass media.

1. Interpersonal communication

2. Mediated interpersonal communication

3. Convergence

4. Feedback

C. Examine the patterns and significance of media ownership.

1. Monopolies

2. Horizontal and vertical integration

D. Describe the relationship between the media and government.

1. Private ownership

2. Government ownership/control

E. Recognize the importance of audience in media operations.

1. Meaning

2. Economics

3. New technology

II. Media Impact: Understanding Effects

A. Discuss significant studies in media effects.

B. Describe various theories of media influence and effects.

1. Social learning

2. Individual differences

3. Cultivation

4. Agenda-setting

5. Uses and gratification

C. Describe the relationship between the media and popular culture.

III. Media Law

A. Examine common controversies surrounding the interpretation of the First Amendment.

B. Describe the philosophies of First Amendment freedoms.

C. Discuss the relevance of sedition laws in America and globally.

D. Recognize the issues surrounding obscenity laws.

1. Print media

2. Electronic media

3. New media

E. Differentiate between print regulations and electronic media regulations.

1. Equal opportunity rule

2. The Fairness Doctrine

3. Ownership limitations

F. Describe the issues surrounding deregulation of the mass media.

G. Differentiate between obscenity and indecency.

H. Explain the relevance of national security and prior restraint.

I. Examine current trends in media law.

1. Globalization

2. Concentration of ownership

3. New technology issues

J. Recognize the essential areas relating to protection of rights.

1. Personal rights and privacy

a. Private facts

b. Intrusion

c. Appropriation

2. Defamation

a. Slander

b. Libel

K. Explain the primary defenses against libel and slander charges.

1. Truth

2. Actual malice

3. Privilege

4. Fair Comment and Criticism

L. Discuss the importance of intellectual property rights.

1. Copyright law

2. Fair use

M. Describe the controversies surrounding censorship issues.

1. Political, artistic and commercial speech

2. Shield laws

N. Examine the issue of laws that conflict with the public’s right to know.

1. Free press/fair trial

2. Gag orders

3. Cameras in the courtroom

IV. Media Ethics

A. Explain the history of media ethics in our print and electronic society.

1. Ethical philosophies

2. McCarthyism

3. Hutchins Commission

4. World Trade Center attacks

5. Corporate interests

B. Discuss issues relating to hoaxes and deceptions in the mass media.

1. Janet Cook

2. Jayson Blair

3. The Digital Era

C. Explain the basic ethical orientations.

1. Absolutist ethics

2. Situational ethics

D. Examine media codes of ethics.

1. In entertainment

2. In advertising and public relations

3. In the news media

E. Discuss personal controversies inherent in media ethics.

1. Stereotyping

2. Conflicts of interests

F. Describe issues relating to accountability in media ethics.

1. Anonymity

2. Standards and practices

3. Citizens groups

4. Truth in advertising

V. Public Relations: The Image Industry

A. Describe how public relations is defined by the industry.

1. Informing

2. Persuading

3. Integrating

B. Relate the history and growth of public relations in America.

C. Describe public relations as a profession.

1. Early days of Ivy Lee

2. Tactics used by Edward L. Bernays

3. Government use during wartime

D. Describe today’s public relations processes.

1. Research

2. Measurable objectives

3. Evaluation

E. Public relations audiences.

1. Internal

2. External

F. Explore the strategies used by the public relations industry.

1. Media relations

2. Community relations

3. Crisis management

4. Lobbying

G. Discuss the tools used by public relations professionals.

1. Social media

2. Video news releases

3. Special events

4. Corporate sponsorship

H. Describe ethical dilemmas in the public relations business.

1. Spin

2. Accountability

VI. Advertising: Selling a Message

A. Describe the industry’s early development.

1. Industrialization

2. Modernization

3. Branding

4. Trademarks

B. Explain the types of consumer advertising-supported media.

1. Local and national advertising

2. Direct message advertising

3. Advocacy advertising

4. Public service advertising

C. Identify the types and functions of a modern advertising agency.

1. Research and planning

2. Creative process

3. Media planning

D. Identify the various types of media used in advertising.

1. Newspapers

2. Broadcast outlets

3. Online

4. Direct mail

5. Magazines

6. Radio

7. Outdoor

E. Describe the targeting of audiences.

1. Psychographics

2. Demographics

3. Geographics

F. Explain the criticisms of the industry.

1. Truth in advertising

2. Advertising clutter

3. Advertising to children

4. Subliminals

5. Product placement

6. Influencing the news

G. Clarifying advertising’s future.

1. Integrated marketing

2. Mobile uses

VII. Books: The Birth of the Mass Media

A. Explain the early forms of books.

1. Papyrus

2. Parchment

B. Examine books’ global contributions to the industry.

C. Describe the Industrial Revolution/evolution of books.

1. Encouraging literacy

2. Technological determinism

3. Colonial publishers

4. Development of libraries

D. Discuss the effects of the modern mass-produced book on society.

E. Describe the development of book conglomeration and globalization.

F. Examine newer forms of the book.

1. Audiobooks

2. E-books

3. Trade books

4. Educational books

5. Professional books

G. Identify the important “players” in the book publishing industry.

1. Author

2. Editor

3. Publisher

4. Bookseller

5. Reader

H. Describe the controversies surrounding the book industry.

1. Local censorship

2. Global censorship

VIII. Newspapers: Where Journalism Begins

A. Describe the development of early newspapers.

1. Global publishing

2. American publishing

B. Examine the impact of the early American newspapers.

C. Discuss early attempts at government control.

D. Explain changes in the concept of news through newspapers.

1. The editorial page

2. Hard news

3. Feature news

4. Ethnic and minority press

E. Discuss the various eras of newspaper development.

1. The Penny Press

2. Yellow journalism

3. Investigative journalism

4. Jazz journalism

5. Tabloid journalism

F. Describe how newspapers adapt to modern times.

1. In-depth coverage

2. Changing publication patterns

3. Online presence

G. Discuss the categories of today’s newspaper industry.

1. Dailies

2. National dailies

3. Local dailies

4. Weeklies

5. Special interest newspapers

a. Community and suburban press

b. Alternative press

c. Ethnic press

H. Explain the concept of “news values.”

1. Timeliness

2. Importance

3. Interest

I. Examine issues of the 21st century.

1. Breaking news

2. Web and mobile delivery

3. Hyperlocal news

IX. Magazines: Words and Images

A. Describe the evolution of the magazine industry.

1. Early magazines

2. Photojournalism’s emphasis

3. Importance of the cover

4. Digital delivery

B. Discuss the economics of the industry.

1. Consumer

2. Trade

3. Literary

4. Journals

5. Comic books

6. Webzines

C. Discuss issues of controversy in the magazine industry.

1. Impact of images

2. Truth and accuracy

3. Editorial independence

4. Changes in the digital age

X. Movies: Moving Pictures

A. Describe early movie technology.

1. Persistence of vision

2. Peep shows

3. Kinetoscope

B. Discuss early practices of the movie industry.

1. Thomas Edison

2. Eadweard Muybridge

3. D.W. Griffith, Edwin Porter

C. Explain the impact of the studio and star systems of movie production.

1. Block booking

2. Blind booking

D. Explain how the golden age of movies developed and moved the industry forward.

1. From silent films to talkies

2. Culture and color

3. Minority films

4. The end of studio monopolies

E. Describe how movies were affected by the emergence of television.

F. Examine how the movie industry has adapted to new media.

1. Issue of movie downloading

2. Using digital technology in production and distribution

3. Using digital technology in today’s theaters

G. Explain the various methods of movie distribution.

1. Marketing windows

2. Domestic theatrical

3. Overseas theatrical

4. Home and mobile media

5. Television

H. Describe today’s movie business operations

1. The theater

2. The audience

3. The blockbuster era

4. Home video

5. Digital distribution and projection

6. Profits

I. Examine the controversies inherent in the movie industry.

1. Effects of movie viewing

2. Distortions of reality

3. Violence

4. Stereotyping

5. Sexuality

J. Discuss the impact of censorship on the movie industry.

K. Describe today’s movie rating system and reasons for its development.

XI. Recordings and the Music Industry

A. Explain music’s history and early recording technology.

1. The phonograph

2. Analog recording

3. The gramophone

4. Cylinders versus discs

B. Describe how new technology change the recording industry.

1. Invention of radio

2. Stereo and high fidelity

3. Digital technology

C. Discuss the emergence of music styles.

1. Rock 'n' roll

2. Country

3. Blues

4. Jazz

5. Pop

6. Hip-hop

7. Rap

D. Describe how format wars change the industry.

1. Albums

2. Tapes

3. Compact discs

4. Mp3

E. Explain how royalties are paid out to professionals in the recording industry.

F. Describe how recordings and music are distributed and sold.

G. Examine issues of controversy relevant to the recording industry.

1. Copyright battles

2. Format wars

3. Illegal downloading

H. Explain some of the effects song lyrics and recorded material have on society.

I. Discuss issues of censorship that have plagued the industry.

1. Album labeling

2. Government criticism

3. Chain-store restrictions

4. Radio play restrictions

XII. Radio: the Aural Medium

A. Explain the importance of the electromagnetic spectrum in the development of radio.

1. Hertz discovers radio waves

2. Marconi develops wireless telegraphy

3. Fessenden adds voice to radio

4. Conrad as first commercial broadcaster

B. Discuss the rise of the radio networks in America.

1. Impact of AT&T

2. Birth of RCA

3. Competition from competing networks

C. Describe the issues surrounding government control of radio.

D. Describe the differences between broadcasting transmission and digital transmission.

E. Explain how radio reacted to the birth of television.

1. Rise of FM

2. Wireless radio

3. Radio formats

F. Explain how digital technology changed the way people listen to radio.

G. Explain how today’s radio industry continues to evolve.

1. Emerging dayparts

2. Talk/news formats

3. Ratings

4. Satellite technology

5. Online listening

6. Mp3 technology

H. Describe how the radio industry is structured.

1. Local stations

2. Group ownership

3. Program providers

I. Discuss the differences between commercial and noncommercial broadcasting formats broadcasts.

J. Discuss issues of controversy in the radio industry.

1. Payola

2. Illegal downloading

3. Talk radio

4. Homogenized programming

5. Shock radio

6. Hate radio

7. Ratings measurement

8. Government control

K. Alternatives to radio.

1. Streaming audio

2. Podcasting

XIII. Television: Beyond Broadcasting

A. Describe television’s early technology that led to the development of technical standards for the industry.

B. Discuss the rise of network television.

1. NBC, ABC, CBS, Dumont

2. Station affiliates

C. Examine the era of television’s golden age.

D. Describe ways television changed family life.

E. Explain how cable entered the television marketplace.

F. Describe how television adapted to new technologies.

1. VCR

2. Digital technologies

3. High-definition television

4. Online television

G. Discuss how television both reflects and affects viewers through its delivery systems.

1. Cable industry

2. Superstations

3. Premium cable

4. Public access channels

5. Satellite television

6. Networks

7. Local network-affiliated stations

8. Independent stations

H. Explain how program providers deliver content.

1. Network programming

2. Syndication programming

3. Public television programming

I. Describe the differences between rating systems used to measure audience viewing.

1. Rating

2. Share

3. Nielsen results

a. People meter

b. Personal diaries

c. Sweeps months

J. Discuss issues of controversy in the television industry.

1. Perpetuating indecency

2. Reinforcing stereotypes

3. Lack of educational programming

4. Excessive viewing

5. Diversity issues

K. Discuss the parental advisory ratings assigned by a show’s producer or the network.

L. Describe the potential for television’s future.

1. Interactive TV

2. Video on-demand

3. Convergence of TV and the Internet

XIV. The Internet: Convergence in a Networked World

A. Describe the history of the Internet and how the computer became a medium of mass communication.

1. Early days of the computer

2. Military roots

a. ARPANET, an early computer network

b. Transitioning to digital

c. Developing protocols

B. Describe how the Internet transitioned from the military to civilians.

C. Explain how YouTube became an Internet phenomenon.

D. Describe the concept of Web 2.0.

E. Examine the global dimension the Internet offers users.

1. Email

2. Information and entertainment

3. Electronic commerce

4. Cyberspace communities

F. Explain how some global governments place obstacles on Internet use.

G. Describe the main components that make up the Internet.

1. Hosts

2. Access providers

3. Java

4. Domain names

5. Browsers

6. Search engines

H. Discuss the use of netiquette as a communication tool.

I. Examine manners in which people become engaged with the Internet.

1. Listservs

2. User-created content

3. Weblogs

4. Online games

5. Social networking

J. Describe the economics of the Internet.

1. Employment patterns

2. E-commerce

3. Advertising

4. Paid content

5. Distance learning

6. Aggregator sites

K. Discuss issues of controversy with the Internet.

1. Spyware

2. Hackers

3. Viruses

4. Trojan horses

5. Phishing

6. Spam

7. Net neutrality

8. Censorship

9. Privacy

10. Reliability of information

11. Online predators

XV. Global Media: Reflections of an International World

A. Interpret the values of mass media around the world.

1. Communist theory

2. Authoritarian theory

3. Social responsibility theory

B. Describe the legal media systems throughout the our global world.

C. Explain the differences in uses of public relations and advertising techniques globally.

D. Discuss the freedoms and lack of freedoms in media throughout our world.

1. Printed media

2. Broadcast media

3. The Internet

E. Examine the importance of the global influence on the art of film.

F. Explain the controversy and impact of Al Jazeera.

G. Discuss the dangers that journalists face, globally.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-65% of grade    Testing
20-50% of grade     Written work
5-25% of grade       Attendance/Participation

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 120H

No information found.

JOUR 122

  • Title: News Writing and Reporting
  • Number: JOUR 122
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

News Writing and Reporting prepares students who want to gain basic news-gathering and reporting skills across print, broadcast and online media platforms. Interviewing, researching and story writing under strict deadlines provide students with strong experiences in the storytelling process. News writing and style principles will be gained through stories produced for campus student media. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize the factors that determine news.
  2. Demonstrate the importance of the story angle for one's readers, a diverse audience.
  3. Conduct successful interviews.
  4. Write stories in print, broadcast/video and online news styles.
  5. Write stories under deadline situations.
  6. Perform basic editing skills.
  7. Practice basic on-camera reporting skills for visual media.
  8. Demonstrate basic press journalistic media responsibilities.
  9. Report news effectively and responsibly.
  10. Write stories that may be considered for publication in The Campus Ledger or broadcast on a campus radio or television station for use by on-campus student media.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. News and News Factors

A. Determine what is news.

1. List the common elements of news.

a. Timeliness

b. Prominence

c. Consequence

d. Human interest

e. Proximity

f. Impact

2. Evaluate the methods for assessing the value of potential news stories.

3. Differentiate between "hard" and "soft" news.

4. Describe the primary characteristics of print, broadcast and online news.

B. Develop Story Ideas

1. List the methods for discovering story ideas.

2. Explain the terms, "news beat" and “nose for news.”

3. Identify the major types of story sources.

II. Story Angle

A. Describe the term "story angle."

1.Describe how to find the story angle. 

2. Learn how to narrow a story’s focus.

3. Determine the process for covering a story’s angle.

4. Submit a news tip or story idea by using appropriate recognition methods.

5. Complete a class tip sheet/story idea form.

6. Cite printed, online, and face-to-face resources used for story information.

B. Describe specific news scenes.

1. Discuss speech coverage, including the factors to consider. 

2. Describe the challenges of covering a news conference.

3. Explain how to determine the focus for a meeting story.

4. Identify the sources of information for a crime story.

5. List the elements of every accident or disaster story.

C. Recognize the types of stories to cover.

1. Differentiate between “hard” and “soft” news.

2. Distinguish characteristics of straight news, features and profiles.

D. Apply principles of good reporting.

1. Prepare a story budget form for an upcoming speech, news conference or meeting.

2. Defend a budget using the methods for assessing news value.

3. Report a breaking news story for a crime, accident or disaster scene.

4. Critique similar stories submitted by other class members.

III. News Source Interviews

A. Demonstrate proper planning the Interview.

1. Describe the fundamental steps in planning an interview.

2. Explain the basic steps in establishing rapport with a news source.

B. Conduct the interview.

1. Describe developing and phrasing interview questions.

2. Explain “open-ended” and “closed-ended” questioning.

3. Describe the importance of follow-up questions.

C. Recognize the importance of ensuring accuracy.

1. Describe effective note-taking and observing.

2. Explain the pros and cons of using a digital recorder.

D. Apply journalistic skills for the interview.

1. Conduct background research.

2. Prepare questions to ask source(s) for the type of story being covered, and conduct the interview(s).

3. Maintain notes taken during the interview(s) (plus a digital recording (if a recorder was used).

4. Analyze notes (and digital recording) for developing the story. 

IV. Story Structure

A. Use Inverted Pyramid structure for written stories.

1. Describe the identifying characteristics of the Inverted Pyramid story structure.

2. Explain the advantages of the Inverted Pyramid.

3. List the types of stories for which the Inverted Pyramid structure is suited.

B. Use Timeliness structure for broadcast and video stories

1. Describe the identifying characteristics of the broadcast and video story structure.

2. Discuss the advantages of the broadcast and video structure.

3. List the types of stories for which the broadcast and video/structure is suited.

C. Use Nonlinear/ digital structure for online reporting.

1. Describe the identifying characteristics of the online story structure.

2. Discuss the advantages of the online structure.

3. List the types of stories for which the online/digital structure is suited.

D. Apply journalistic knowledge to create the story.

1. Organize story/interview information in Inverted Pyramid structure.

2. Reorganize story/interview information into Timeliness structure.

3. Present story/interview information in Nonlinear structure.

V. Story Elements and Information Within a Structure

A. Develop a strong lead.

1. Explain the purpose of a story lead.

2. List the basic questions journalists ask to determine which elements should be included in a written, broadcast and on-line lead.

3. Identify the types of "hard news" leads.

4. Identify the types of "soft news" leads.

B. Illustrate use of the nut graf.

1. Explain the term nut graf.

2. Identify the types of stories in which a nut graf is used.

3. Describe the purpose of the nut graf.

4. Describe where a nut graf should be located.

C. Develop the body of the story.

1. Explain the purpose of the body of a news story.

2. List the methods for mapping a news story’s development.

3. Describe techniques for moving smoothly from one paragraph or sequence to the next in the body of a news story.

4. Describe the techniques for maintaining reader interest.

D. Develop the ending of the story.

1. Explain the importance of the story ending.

2. Describe the types of story endings, including when each should be used.

E. Illustrate story adjuncts.

1. Explain the purpose and types of story headlines.

2. Define the term “point-of-entry” and tell where this may occur.

3. Evaluate visual elements used to enhance reader, listener and viewer understanding.

F. Apply journalistic skills to story coverage.

1. Write a hard news in Inverted Pyramid style.        

2. Revise and edit the story for easier readability.

3. Rewrite the story in broadcast/video style.

4. Rewrite story as an online story summary. 

5. Provide suggestions for visual elements to support the story in print, broadcast/video and online environments. 

6. Write a headline for the story in print, broadcast/video and online environments. 

VI. The Writing and Editing Process

A. Employ writing and revision techniques to a finished story.

1. Review basic story elements/structures.

2. Describe basic writing tips for reporters.

3. Follow the writing guidelines of the Associated Press style guide.

4. Use standard proofreading/copy editing procedures.

5. Provide tips for revising and tightening news stories.

B. Create a strong, edited story for audience dissemination.

1. Produce a news story for print, broadcast and online   audiences using appropriate focus, organizational and development techniques.

2. Revise and edit the story using appropriate proofreading/editing procedure, to produce final copy.

3. Peer critique a story written by another class member.

VII. News On Camera

A. Produce a script in proper format for broadcast/online video reporting.

B. Utilize practical skills for reporting events live.

C. Display required performance techniques of a reporter on a live shot.

D. Exhibit the importance of speaking appropriately to the audience through the camera lens.

VIII. Announcer as Communicator

A. Display the skills of an effective announcer.

B. Apply strategies for improving speech personality.

C. Convey interest in the news reporting content.

D. Create effective audience rapport.

E. Evaluate radio and TV/Video performances.

F. Practice vocal techniques for on-air reporting.

IX. Responsibilities of the Press

A. Apply knowledge of media law.

1. Discuss the First Amendment as it applies to the U.S. Press.

2. List the fundamental press rights of journalists.

3. Describe the history, purpose and limits of the Freedom of Information Act.

4. Discuss the value and function of open records and open meetings laws.

B. Demonstrate knowledge of media ethics.

1. Define the principles of reporting.

2. Identify the elements of libel.

3. List the primary libel defenses.

4. Identify secondary libel defenses.

5. Discuss additional issues relevant to media ethics.

a. Deceit

b. Conflicts of interest

c. Gifts and freebies

d. Withholding information

e. Plagiarism

f. Invasion of privacy

g. Hidden cameras

h. Protection of sources

i. Access to courts and copyrights

j. Fair use

C. Apply ethical considerations to real-life situations.

1. Summarize the services offered on the Freedom of Information Center (FOI) web site.

2. Describe how to file a FOI request.

3. Report on media ethics case.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

45-55%    Stories, budgets, and in-class exercises
30-40%    Quizzes, peer critiques and timed writings
10-15%    Collaborative classmate work

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Students must possess basic word processing skills and a working knowledge of Microsoft Word.
  2. The knowledge and effective use of the English language, its style and techniques, plus the ability and desire to investigate, analyze and correlate information and ideas are paramount. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 122H

No information found.

JOUR 125

  • Title: Fundamentals of Advertising
  • Number: JOUR 125
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Fundamentals of Advertising introduces the student to the contemporary advertising process. Research, planning, creativity, production and media scheduling are discussed, along with individual mediums and their forms, functions and roles in society. Major emphasis is placed on advertising and integrated marketing research, planning and creativity. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Distinguish between advertising and public relations.
  2. Critically evaluate advertising’s effect on society.
  3. Discern the impact of advertising on the economies of the U.S. and foreign nations.
  4. Recognize the developing foundations of global advertising and marketing.
  5. Identify the components of the advertising process.
  6. Discover personnel roles and individual career opportunities within the advertising field.
  7. Understand each step of the advertising process. 
  8. Demonstrate the ability to develop an advertising/IMC campaign.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Contrast advertising and public relations
   A. Similarities
       1. Purpose
       2. Process  
   B. Differences 
       1. Message
       2. Placement
 
II. Trace the history and societal effects of Advertising, nationally and globally
   A. Examine distinguishing characteristics
       1. Preindustrial Age
       2. Industrial Age
       3. Postindustrial Age
       4. Global Interactive Age
       5. The Twenty-first Century
   B. Discuss Advertising’s relationship to the marketing process 
       1. Inform
       2. Persuade
       3. Remind

III. Explain the economic, social, and regulatory aspects of Advertising
   A. Describe the principles of free market economics
       1. Products
       2. Prices
       3. Competition
       4. Abundance Principle
   B. Discuss the social impact of Advertising
       1. Language
       2. Values
       3. Stereotyping
       4. Offensiveness
       5. Proliferation
       6. Deception/Manipulation
   C. Identify current regulatory agencies
       1. Federal
       2. State/Local
       3. Non-governmental

IV. Examine the components of the Advertising industry
   A. Identify major categories of Advertising media
       1. Print
       2. Electronic
       3. Digital /Interactive
       4. Out-of-Home
       5. Direct Mail
       6. Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC) 
   B. Describe the types of Advertisers in today’s market
       1. Local
       2. Regional
       3. National
       4. Transnational
       5. Global
   C. Categorize Advertising agencies according to geography and range of service
        1. Local
        2. Regional
        3. National
        4. Full-service
        5. Specialized 
        6. In-House
    D. Discuss the role of suppliers in the Advertising business
        1. Art/Design
        2. Printing
        3. Film/Video
        4. Research  
    E. Describe personnel roles and career opportunities within the Advertising field
        1. Account Management
        2. Research/Account Planning
        3. Media planning/buying
        4. Creative
        5. Production
        6. Traffic
        7. Production
        8. Traffic
    F. Explain Advertising agency compensation, client procurement, 
and factors affecting the client/agency relationship
        1. Commissions
        2. Markups
        3. Fees/Retainers
        4. Referral
        5. Presentation
        6. Networking/Community Relations
        7. Solicitation

V. Examine the development of an advertising/IMC campaign for a specific market 
   A. Explain market segmentation
       1. Consumer
       2. Business
       3. Government
   B. Discuss target market selection 
       1. Consumer behavior/Motivation
       2. Demographics
       3. Psychographics/VALS
       4. Family, societal and cultural influences
   C. Examine factors involved in matching products to markets
       1. Product concept
       2. Branding
       3. Packaging
       4. Positioning
       5. Marketing mix
   D. Discuss market development and advertising plans 
       1. Top-Down
       2. Bottom-Up
       3. Relationship Marketing/IMC
       4. Objectives
       5. Strategies 
       6. Allocating funds

VI. Examine creative strategy and process
   A. Examine the ingredients of effective advertising messages 
       1. Resonance
       2. Relevance 
       3. Advertising Pyramid
       4. Creative Pyramid
       5. “Big Idea”
   B. Identify the creative elements used in advertising
       1. Logo
       2. Trade Character/Icon
       3. Tagline
       4. Jingle
   C. Discuss copywriting for print media
       1. Headline
       2. Subheads
       3. Visuals
       4. Text block
   E. Discuss copywriting for digital interactive media 
       1. Web sites/Home Page/Sponsorship
       2. Banner/Button/Interstitial/Rich Text
       3. E-mail

VII. Examine the importance of media planning and buying in the 
advertising/marketing process
   A. Discuss the role of media in the marketing framework
       1. Audience objectives
       2. Message-Distribution objectives
       3. Reach 
       4. Frequency 
   B. Explain the factors involved in developing media strategy
       1. Markets
       2. Money
       3. Media
       4. Mechanics
       5. Methodology
   C. Discuss the factors involved in selecting/scheduling media vehicles
       1. Objectives
       2. Strategy
       3. Audiences 
       4. Cost
       5. Reach/Frequency 
   D. Examine three principle scheduling tactics
       1. Continuous
       2. Flighting
       3. Pulsing

VIII. Develop a comprehensive advertising/IMC plan for the Kansas City area. 
   A. Create a Project Proposal
       1. Consumer needs/wants
       2. Brand benefits
       3. Competition
   B. Conduct a SWOT Analysis
       1. Strengths
       2. Weaknesses
       3. Opportunities
       4. Threats 
   C. Develop a Marketing Plan
       1. Distribution plan
       2. Positioning strategy
       3. Pricing strategy
       4. Additional merchandising/IMC opportunities
   D. Construct a Media Plan
       1. Print
       2. Electronic
       3. Outdoor
       4. Transit
       5. Supplemental/specialty
   E. Produce Communication Vehicles
       1.Print Advertisement
       2. Radio Script/Spot
       3. Television Storyboard/Commercial
       4. Web Page

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 A comprehensive advertising/IMC campaign.

 Grading Criteria:
   90 - 100% = A
   80 -  89% = B
   70 -  79% = C
   60 -  69% = D
   Below 60% = F

Point Summary:

Testing                         = 30-40% of grade
Assignments and Projects        = 40-60% of grade
Attendance/Participation        = 10-20% of grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Knowledge and effective use of the English language, including correct grammar, spelling and punctuation.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 125H

No information found.

JOUR 127

  • Title: Introduction to Broadcasting
  • Number: JOUR 127
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course serves students interested in gaining a greater understanding of broadcast and emerging technologies. Class time includes discussion of trends and issues, including regulations, ethics, news and information, and audience ratings. Productions in the college's student media facilities offer opportunities to experience and further evaluate their relationship to broadcast and related electronic media. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the industry history and its modern day developments.
  2. Distinguish differences in the function and business of the industry.
  3. Determine limitations and advancing capabilities of the industry.
  4. Experience real-world consumer broadcast activities including vocal work and editing your content on your own computer.
  5. Evaluate the role of broadcast and new technology as news and entertainment media.
  6. Discuss the potential for further changes in broadcasting and related electronic media.
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of government regulations, laws, and ethics in the industry.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History and Development of the Industry

A. Discuss technological media developments.

1. Describe the history and growth of radio.

2. Describe the history and growth of television.

3. Identify the impact of cable television on the industry.

4. Discuss the history and potential of the Internet.

a. Social media.

b. Educational media.

c. Informational media.

5. Provide insight into other forms of electronic media.

a. Describe the growth of computers and satellites.

b. Discuss the potential for future uses of electronic media.

B. Analyze corporate use of electronic media.

C. Evaluate the effects of consumer use of electronic media.

II. The Electronic Media Industry Functions and Business Functions

A. Describe the managerial hierarchy in the broadcast media industry.

1. Identify responsibilities to consumers.

2. Distinguish financial necessities impacting the industry.

3. Describe programming ideas with the audience in mind.

B. Comprehend the role of advertising.

1. Describe financial and advertising practices used today.

2. Discuss examples of ads and promotions.

3. Identify controversial issues today and in the future.

C. Discuss the importance of audience feedback.

1. Describe the rating systems used today.

2. Measure calculations of ratings and shares.

3. Analyze qualitative vs. quantitative research about broadcast and emerging technologies.

D. Analyze the future of the industry.

1. Identify new trends in electronic media.

2. Analyze how consumers' use of electronic media may change over time.

III. The Limits and Capabilities of Electronic Media

A. Describe the controversies of emerging media.

B. Explain the effects of corporate mergers and consolidations on the industry and consumers.

C. Analyze reasons for programming changes.

D. Compare/contrast commercial and non-commercial formats.

IV. Experiencing the Realities of a Changing Broadcast Landscape

A. Describe the growth and purpose of the electromagnetic spectrum.

B. Discuss the growth and changes in terrestrial, wire, microwave, satellite Internet and wireless distribution.

C. Participate in a basic activity with ECAV radio on campus.

D. Participate in a basic video activity with JCAV-TV on campus.

V. News and Entertainment

A. Evaluate programming ideas for a fragmenting audience.

B. Discuss differences in program formats/genres.

C. Analyze news and informational programming.

D. Clarify issues related to children's programming.

E. Describe the controversies inherent in the merging of information and entertainment into "infotainment."

VI. Future of the Electronic Media

A. Describe technological advancements that will produce opportunities for consumer uses.

B. List potential future uses yet to be determined for media technologies.

VII. Laws, Regulations and Ethical Decisions

A. Describe the role of the Federal Communications Commission.

B. Explain the roles of the executive, legislative and judicial branches in electronic and digital media.

C. Discuss the First Amendment issues and controversies facing the industry.

D. Discuss the impact of copyright policies on the industry.

1. Describe local, state and federal laws.

2. Explain issues pertaining to regulations.

3. List implications of infringement.

E. List and discuss controversies related to ethical decision-making.

F. Identify the effects of social issues on the ethics of the industry.

G. Discuss potential future issues facing the industry.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%:    Testing
30-60%:    Projects/written work
10-25%:    Attendance/participation

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 130

  • Title: Principles of Public Relations
  • Number: JOUR 130
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is intended to provide the student with an overview of the history, principles and real-life functions of public relations. Public relations is a rapidly growing field. The ability to communicate well with the public is essential in business, education, health care and numerous other fields. This course is designed to give students the background to develop their PR skills. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the history of public relations and its development into a profession.
  2. Explain the role of contemporary public relations in society.
  3. Report on the media used by professionals in the field.
  4. Compare the role of public relations in various organizational contexts.
  5. Critique the concepts, ethics, and practices within the public relations profession. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

  I. Public Relations History
     A. Describe the beginnings of the business.
     B. Describe late American experience of the business.
     C. Demonstrate the rise of contemporary PR.
        1. The role of the Internet.
        2. Use of media convergence.

 II. The Role of Public Relations in Society, Business, and Government
     A. Interpret the relationship between management and public
relations.
     B. Relate the importance of public relations issues in public opinion
research.
     C. Describe communication theories used in public relations.
     D. Describe the importance of public opinion in public relations
practice.
     E. Relate the cross-training efforts of public relations and
marketing.
     F. Describe public relations practices in multicultural communities.
     G. Discuss the government’s role and practice of public relations.
     H. Discuss the part public relations plays in a consumer society.
     I. Describe the importance of public relations with an internal
audience.
     J. Explain persuasive strategies used to influence consumer
behavior.
     K. Describe how to handle public relations problems that arise from
the Internet.


III. Writing for the Media
     A. Describe the contents of a media kit.
     B. Produce written materials used in public relations practice.
     C. Present information based upon research and organization.
     D. Describe handling media situations under pressure.
     E. Practice utilizing public relations techniques with actual cases. 
   
     F. Make use of the Internet as a primary public relations tool.
     G. Produce media materials for business and non-profit uses.
     H. Implement issues management in crisis communications.
     I. Demonstrate use of all media, including newspapers, magazines, TV,
Internet, and new media in developing a cohesive PR campaign.

 IV. Ethics and the Law
     A  Describe ethical issues facing a public relations practitioner.
     B. Describe the importance of ethics, privacy, and copyright in the
PR field.
     C. Participate in ethical PR decision making.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class participation = 10 - 30%
Exams               = 20 - 30% 
Written Work        = 20 - 50%
Term Project        = 10 - 30% 
TOTAL                100%

Grading Criteria: 
90 - 100% = A 
80 -  89% = B 
70 -  79% = C 
60 -  69% = D

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 145

  • Title: Photojournalism
  • Number: JOUR 145
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to meet the photographic needs of journalism students. It provides a journalistic approach to the concepts and application of photography for multimedia. Students will use cameras, computers and software to master the issues, concepts and constraints involved in creating images for a broad range of media. They will prepare and format digitized image files for storage and transmission, and print and Web-based reproduction. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize terms in the vocabulary of photojournalism technology.
  2. Describe the legal and ethical issues photojournalists encounter in the profession.
  3. Learn basic techniques for processing and improving quality images.
  4. Discuss why video and multimedia are part of the photojournalist’s job.
  5. Define and describe the types or styles of photojournalistic coverage.
  6. Produce photographic images in the various styles that would be required of a photojournalist.
  7. Write descriptive captions that capture the reader’s attention via interesting, newsworthy or unusual facts.
  8. Capture visual information using proper technical equipment. Publish to a variety of media, including publications and new media.
  9. Produce a photo story through images alone.
  10. Develop a contract appropriate for publishable images. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Terminology and Vocabulary of Photojournalism Technology

A. Identify the basic vocabulary used in photojournalism.

B. Define specific terms used in photojournalism.

II. Styles of Photojournalistic Coverage

A. Differentiate between spot news and general news.

B. Define a documentary project.

C. Explain the characteristics of features, including:

1. Picture stories

2. Environmental portrait

3. Event/society

4. Conceptual illustration

D. Describe the differences between posed and candid portraits.

E. Explain the techniques of shooting sports.

1. Getting sharp images

2. Using lenses

3. Lighting properly

F. Define and describe each type of photo illustration, including:

1. Commentary

2. Editorial

3. Training/educational

4. Advertisement

5. Corporate report

G. Produce photojournalistic images for use in publications.

1. Spot and general news

2. Features

3. Portraits

4. Sports

H. Write descriptive captions for story enhancement.

1. Describe various caption writing styles

2. Learn the proper Associated Press formula for caption writing

3. Produce clearly written captions that answer the 5 W's and "H"

III. Technical Photographic Images

A. Use photographic equipment and materials.

1. Identify and discuss camera formats for various media

2. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of digital capture of images

3. Describe lighting types and equipment, including:

a. Available "natural" light

b. Hot lights (tungsten)

c. Electronic flash/strobe

B. Apply basic lighting techniques.

1. Use simple studio lighting for portraits

a. Main light: place highlights and determine shadows/direction

b. Fill light: measure and set lighting, ratio/contrast control

c. Back light: add form, increase background separation

d. Background light: set up and adjust

2. Control location lighting; enhance visible light.

a. Use reflectors

b. Integrate fill flash

C. Choose appropriate optical lenses.

D. Research and identify accessories, props, resources, models.

IV. Image Processing

A. Apply image management and manipulation controls, using basic Photoshop techniques, including:

1. "Touch-up" defects/scratches, other minor flaws

2. Apply color corrections

3. Alter "reality" for illustration and discuss ethical concerns related to those changes

B. Produce output images.

1. Generate digital/electronic files

a. Complete Internet file transfer

b. Prepare for disk storage: hard drive; flash drive

c. Create files for Web page publication

2. Discuss digital color management

V. Photo Story: Covering the Issues

A. Develop an awareness of issue reporting.

B. Describe the ingredients for in-depth reporting.

1. Important issues

2. Time constraints

3. Displaying powerful images

C. Generate ideas.

D. Create organization and research.

E. Determine copy writing strategies.

F. Analyze/consider color in the layout.

G. Select composition and reproduction size.

H. Determine resolution constraints (file size, DPI).

I. Control dot gain.

VI. Video and Multimedia: the Photojournalist's New Frontier

A. Describe the use of sound in telling a story.

1. Audio recorders

2. Digital recorders

3. Microphones

4. Windscreens

5. Headphones

6. Natural sound

B. Identify interview photo possibilities.

C. Employ basic interviewing strategies.

1. Understand the benefit of follow-up questions

2. Recognize and master the basics of script writing

D. Describe ways to edit images for a slide show or gallery.

1. Pacing the images

2. Marrying images, sound and text

E. Master basic operation of a video camera.

1. Auto focus

2. Manual focus

3. Consistent color

4. Panning and zooming

5. Dollying

F. "Capture" still frames from a video camera.

G. Describe the image transfer process from camera to computer.

1. Name your clips

2. Name your bins

VII. Legal and Ethical Issues

A. Explain the principles of the First Amendment.

B. Describe the concepts of libel and prior restraint.

C. Differentiate between invasion of privacy vs. "right to know."

D. Describe the laws with regard to public figures vs. private individuals.

E. Determine when self-censorship is effective.

F. Describe when the altering of photographic images goes too far.

G. Discuss the concept of pictures not duplicating reality.

H. Describe ethical issues and matters of "taste" and "sensitivity."

1. Bias and "political correctness"

2. Representations of religion, race, gender, age, sexual orientation

I. Discuss the concept of "Truth" -- retouching, digital manipulations and what is acceptable.

J. Describe the proper use of photo releases, identification of individuals in photos, images of minors.

VIII. Contract Negotiation

A. Describe the purpose/relevance of the assignment.

B. Determine workable deadlines.

C. Describe photographers' rights.

D. Adhere to copyright laws.

IX. Professional Photojournalism

A. Identify and research communication markets that publish images.

1. Stock agencies

2. Newspapers

3. Magazines

4. Websites

5. Online publications

6. Advertising

B. List procedures for developing a portfolio.

C. Describe ways to work with reporters and editors.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-25%    Testing

50-75%    Assignments

10-30%    Final Project or Portfolio

100%       Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

1. Student must provide his/her own digital camera and memory card(s). 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 202

  • Title: Broadcast Performance
  • Number: JOUR 202
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Students will learn how to improve their speaking voices and body language as well as the techniques necessary to effectively communicate messages through basic announcing skills. Interviewing, radio and television news, and commercial announcing are some of the topics covered in this course, which will allow students to polish their skills through performances in the college's television studio and on campus media. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Utilize techniques to effective improve their speaking voice.
  2. Exhibit the skills of an effective announcer.
  3. Discover the skills for proper radio and television announcing and performing.
  4. Interpret communications messages for a variety of audiences.
  5. Develop critical on-air interviewing skills.
  6. Develop skills for writing script.
  7. Produce a basic video news package.
  8. Develop methods of self-improvement and guidance in career advancement.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Voice Quality, Pronunciation and Articulation
   A. Discover the importance of voice improvement.
   B. Apply strategies for improving speech personality.
   C. Relate the causes of mispronunciation.
   D. Debate the controversy over Standard American English.

II. The Announcer as a Communicator
   A. Display the skills of an effective announcer.
   B. Practice interpreting a variety of copy.
   C. Analyze mood and purpose in copy.
   D. Determine effective copy marking.
   E. Verify meaning and pronunciation.
   F. Convey interest in the material.

III. Building Skills for Effective Announcing
   A. Illustrate how our language changes.
   B. Explain the use of politically correct language.
   C. Describe nonstandard expressions and usage.
   D. Create effective audience rapport.
   E. Display proper microphone and camera consciousness.
   F. Exhibit proper preparation for a performance.

IV. Communicating With Your Audience
   A. Deliver ad lib announcements.
   B. Evaluate radio and television performances.
   C. Practice vocal techniques and personalities.

V. The Art of the Interview
   A. Relate the characteristics of an interview show.
   B. Develop critical interviewing techniques.
   C. Describe the components of a successful interview.
   D. Conduct on-air interviews.

VI. Covering Sports
   A. Exhibit the use of sports terminology used in athletic events.
   B. Practice calling sports games and events.

VII. Writing for the Performance
   A. Produce scripts in the proper format for radio and TV/video
programming.
   B. Describe effective news writing style aimed at a specific audience.
   C. Explain the importance of proper editing of a broadcast script.

VIII. The Live Shot
   A. Utilize practical skills for reporting events live.
   B. Describe the relationship between the performer and camera
operator/audio engineer.
   C. List required performance techniques of a reporter on a live shot.
   D. Discuss the importance of speaking appropriately to your audience
through the microphone/camera lens.

IX. Developing the News Package
   A. Perform basic hand-held camera operation.
   B. Display knowledge of proper microphone usage.
   C. Describe the importance of “telling the story” within a news
package’s time constraints.
   D. Perform basic editing skills for a news package.

X. Self-Improvement and Career Guidance
   A. Discover tools necessary for your career.
   B. Develop resumes for broadcast careers.
   C. Learn skills to survive career changes.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Radio and Television Performances and Written Work: 60-80% of course
grade
Quizzes: 10-30% of course grade
                100%

Grading Criteria:
90 - 100% = A
80 -  89% = B
70 -  79% = C
60 -  69% = D
 0 -  59% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 207

  • Title: Radio Production
  • Number: JOUR 207
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides students with the fundamentals of Internet radio production. The goal is to teach students basic techniques in audio console functions, program formats, and editing using computer software. Writing, producing, and performing are included. Students will gain hands-on experience through exposure to the campus radio station, ECAV. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the variety of radio formats in today's industry.
  2. Discuss basic radio distribution methods.
  3. Perform audio console functions.
  4. Utilize the types of recording and playback devices used in Internet radio.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to edit audio files.
  6. Utilize computer hardware and software technology to produce and record an on-air radio shift.
  7. Demonstrate basic performance elements for successful radio programming.
  8. Write and produce content such as news, commercials, and public service announcements for on-air delivery.
  9. Develop interviewing skills for radio broadcast.
  10. Participate in a "remote" broadcast production.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Modern Radio Basics
   A. Describe radio formats.
   B. Discuss target audiences.
   C. Identify the differences between terrestrial and satellite
technology.
   D. Describe the differences between commercial and noncommercial
radio.

II. The Console
   A. Perform console functions.
      1. Amplification.
      2. Routing.
      3. Mixing.
      4. Patching.
   B. Discover the differences between analog and digital consoles.

III. Recording and Playback Devices
   A. Discuss the differences between using various devices.
      1. Compact discs.
      2. Digital devices.
      3. Automation.
      4. Tracking.
   B. Practice using recording and playback devices.
   C. Describe the uses of microphones in creating sound.
      1. Illustrate how microphones work.
      2. Discuss the pickup patterns of various microphones.
         a. Hand-held.
         b. Studio, mounted.
         c. Headset.
         d. Lavalier.
         e. Shotgun.

IV. Electronic Editing
   A. Practice editing techniques. 
      1. Edit a sound file.
      2. Mark edit points.
      3. Demonstrate the purpose of looping.
      4. Illustrate proper dubbing.

V. Recorded Program Production
   A. Describe the differences between recorded versus live production.
   B. Describe the layout of a production studio.
   C. Discuss sources of music.
   D. Practice recording your voice.
   E. Experience using sound effects.

VI. Live, On-Air Production
   A. Describe a typical air shift.
   B. Produce a typical schedule.
   C. Perform using appropriate announcing style.
   D. Demonstrate the blending of sound sources.
   E. Create a plan, in advance, for online services.

VII. Using the Computer in Radio Production
   A. Practice basic broadcast techniques using a computer.
   B. Demonstrate computer-generated effects.
   C. Produce content using computer-assisted editing techniques.

VIII. Performance Techniques
   A. Describe how performance elements support a theme.
   B. Utilize performance elements.
      1. Voice quality.
      2. Timing and pace.
      3. Write copy for effective announcing.
   C. Practice dramatic elements in a production.
      1. Action.
      2. Dialogue.
      3. Setting the tone and plot.
      4. Producing conflict, suspense, and humor.

IX. Commercial and Public Service Announcements
   A. Write commercials.
   B. Produce commercials.
   C. Announce commercials.

X. News Production
   A. Practice news gathering.
   B. Demonstrate effective news writing.
   C. Utilize "active voice" in news preparation.

XI. Talk Shows
   A. Demonstrate proper techniques for interviewing.
   B. Demonstrate effective use of actualities.

XII. Remote and Sports Production
   A. Describe equipment used in remote productions.
   B. Demonstrate techniques for preparing the site.
   C. Practice producing a sports remote.

XIII. Internet Radio
   A. Describe the differences between broadcast and Internet radio.
   B. Demonstrate techniques for Internet radio production.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10 to 30% of grade Examinations
10 to 20% of grade Attendance
60 to 80% of grade Projects/Assignments
Total 100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = 0-59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 220

  • Title: International Media
  • Number: JOUR 220
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The globalization of media has created a necessity to understand the complex media systems established overseas. These systems exert influence over the cultural, political and economic climate in the world's industrialized nations. Students in this course will learn about the history, interconnectivity, technological innovations and controversies surrounding media systems from a diverse selection of countries. Special emphasis in this course will be placed on the understanding of global journalism. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Study the history, operations and trends of the media systems that exist in countries around the world.
  2. Explain the influence of American media on the global stage, as well as opinions of American media and journalism offered by critics and analysts representing different cultures.
  3. Evaluate the major theories of the media and their roles in other countries.
  4. Determine the economic clout of conglomerates in media ownership and news judgment.
  5. Examine legal and ethical controversies in media markets worldwide.
  6. Develop and refine skills in critical thinking, interpersonal communication, and identifying and using reputable sources in your work.
  7. Express ways in which different media systems use propaganda in their efforts to sway public opinion or behaviors.
  8. Recognize issues in global journalism.
  9. Compare the similarities and differences between foreign programs and their locally adapted counterparts.
  10. Analyze the barriers to adopting certain media innovations.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic History, Operations and Global Perceptions of the North American Media System

A.Explain factors that have contributed to the decline of the American media system since the mid-20th century.

B. Illustrate the strength of local and regional media compared to international media.

C. Identify major U.S. media exports and imports.

D. Examine the U.S. government’s history of taking covert action against foreign media and governments.

E. Express the U.S. role in globalization of media.

F. Identify perceptions of and international reactions to U.S. media in industrialized nations.

G. Illustrate the practice of ethnocentrism in U.S. media, as well as its intended and unintended effects.

H. Distinguish differences between background, history, operations and dangers for media systems in North America and those in other regions of the world, including Western Europe, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Australasia and Latin America.

II. Global Press Philosophies

A. Examine the role of the press in fostering political democracy.

B. Identify and offer examples of quality journalism.

C. Debate the concept of media accountability.

III. Major Theories of the Media

A. Define the four classic theories of how the press functions.

1. Authoritarian

2. Libertarian

3. Social Responsibility

4. Soviet Media

B. Outline the more contemporary theories of how the press functions.

1. Development Communication

2. Democratic Participant Media

II. Primary Barriers to Media Development

A. Summarize physical barriers

1. Time zones

2. Inaccessibility to media due to poor infrastructure

3. Lack of natural resources used to produce newsprint or film stock

B. Express cultural barriers

1. Illiteracy

2. Multilingualism

3. Religious beliefs

C. Report economic barriers

1. Poverty -- Sophisticated media systems unable to operate in economically impoverished areas.

2. Unequal allocation of world’s resources and scarcity of equipment.

3. Control of conglomerates and large corporations, especially in the West.

D. Discuss governmental barriers

1. Dangers to press freedoms in the form of internal and external censorship, including government restrictions on Internet use.

2. Threats of libel/slander suits.

3. Other forms include intimidation, jailing, travel restrictions and even death/death threats

E. Review media barriers

1. Shortcomings such as poorly trained or unqualified media practitioners; lack of journalism education.

2. "Hidden advertising" in the form of favorable stories that paint people, businesses or organizations in a favorable light.

III. State of Press Freedoms in Media Systems Across the Globe

A. Distinguish between the good of the many versus the needs of a few.

B. Compare prior restraint in Western cultures and beyond.

C. Contrast use of propaganda, both in the West and abroad.

D. Define ‘authoritarian’ media and identify examples.

E. Identify challenges faced by supporters of press freedom.

1. Global regulation

2. The Internet

3. Disagreement among media practitioners of what can be defined as a serious threat to press freedom and what is a trivial annoyance.

IV. Continuing Media Controversies

A.      Describe cultural imperialism

B.      Describe “neoliberal” globalization

V. Role of Embedded Reporters

A. Illustrate the history of American journalists in foreign countries

B.      Explain the concept of victims of oppressive regimes and conflict as nameless, faceless masses of people who exist only in the periphery of the “average” Westernized media consumer.

1. Feature stories on victims of war

2. Coverage of strife and despotism add human face to stories that may otherwise be ignored.

3. Use of social media

C. Describe the primary reasons for journalistic misreadings

1. Journalists arriving in foreign countries remain unfamiliar with territory

2. Journalists unaware of cultural/societal norms that must be respected

3. Journalists bring with them cultural biases

4. Journalists are trained to reduce complex issues to simplistic explanations that require further investigation, such as binary opposition.

VI. The Concept, Origins and Values of News

A. Develop news judgment

B. Explain our Western concept of objectivity vs. reality of the concept of objectivity in other countries

C. Identify news values

D. Describe the role of journalism education and training in cultivating a definition of news.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

Testing: 30-40% of grade

Assignments and projects: 40-60% of grade

Attendance/participation: 10-20% of grade

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 222

  • Title: Advanced Reporting*
  • Number: JOUR 222
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: JOUR 122.

Description:

This course is designed to sharpen the discernment, critical thinking and writing skills of student journalists. Specific English language rules and principles plus AP news writing style will be emphasized in the production of incisive, well-defined features, profiles, reviews, editorials and personal columns. Professional writings in various media will be examined and critiqued. Class members will have the opportunity to participate in hands-on video shooting and editing of a news story package. Students will gain additional experience by participating in news events, as well as interacting with area media professionals. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Distinguish between news, feature, profile and editorial styles of writing.
  2. Describe the importance of medium/audience characteristics in reporting and writing.
  3. Recognize the importance of focus and technique in communicating with an audience.
  4. Recognize, appreciate and refine individual reporting/writing style.
  5. Plan and conduct in-depth interviews and investigations.
  6. Write clear, accurate and meaningful stories/specialty pieces.
  7. Recognize potential new angles within an existing story to add drama, novelty, conflict or impact.
  8. Describe how the printed newspaper and broadcast/video program are an entities vis-a-vis individual stories, sections or segments.
  9. Establish a personal sense of press responsibility and professional ethics.
  10. Produce an online story and video news package, exhibiting the techniques of electronic news gathering. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Storytelling Techniques
   A. Story structure
      1. Recognize the elements and patterns of story structures.
including the Inverted Pyramid, Hourglass, List and Section Technique.
      2. Select and implement the appropriate structure for specific story
elements.
   B. Narrative/descriptive strategies
      1. Recognize and avoid redundancy, excessive use of adjectives and
unnecessary physical description.
      2. Identify and revise offensive references, including sexist and
racist descriptions.
      3. Incorporate appropriate analogies and similes, strong, active
verbs and specific, concrete nouns.
      4. Include sensory images and dialogue where appropriate.
      5. Engage the reader in the story opening by setting the scene,
establishing a dominant tone or foreshadowing forthcoming events.

II. Revising stories 
   A. Sharpening the focus
      1. Limit the content of the story idea to fit copy space available.
      2. Select the specific angle, and eliminate irrelevant detail.
   B. Brevity
      1. Avoid repetition, redundancy and windy phrases.
      2. Eliminate transitive verbs and relative clauses to reduce
wordiness and passive constructions.
      3. Combine sentences to reduce word count and improve flow.
      4. Reduce unnecessary explanations (telling).
   C. Clarity and concreteness
      1. Organize story information to improve clarity and coherence.   
      2. Add specific, concrete details, including statistics, testimony
and eyewitness accounts
      3. Insert transitions to connect ideas and details and to signal
change.

III. Feature and Specialty Stories  
   A. Finding a focus
      1. List the elements of hard news stories that can be transformed
into features and specialty stories.
      2. Examine story elements to identify a unifying theme.
   B. Determining point of view
      1. Evaluate the characters, plot, pivotal moments and facts that add
drama to the event.
      2. Determine which elements will involve the reader in the story
experience.
   C. Gathering and organizing essential detail
      1. Compile story detail in meaningful units.
      2. Arrange detail according to the laws of progressive reader
involvement.
   D. Application
      1. Using appropriate news gathering methods and the specific
structure of a feature or specialty story, create a news story.
      2. Revise and edit to produce final copy.

IV. Profiles 
   A. Selecting a subject
      1. Identify noteworthy individuals, institutions, events and
situations.
      2. Apply the nut graph principle to determine reader interest,
involvement, and overall story significance/impact.
   B. Developing the theme
      1. Identify the unifying angle that makes the subject newsworthy and
ties the subject matter together.
      2. Apply methods to analyze material and discover patterns, decisive
moments, and turning points in the life/history of the
individual/organization.
   C. Organizing material
      1. Use anecdote, description or narration to set the scene, develop
the lead and draw the reader into the story.
      2. Use concept blocking, time frames or chronology to develop the
body of the profile.
      3. Use an appropriate kicker (quote, circle or future action) to end
the story and fix the profile in the mind of the reader.
   D. Application
      1. Using appropriate news gathering methods and the specific
structure of a profile, create a news story.
      2. Revise and edit to produce final copy.

 V. Editorial and Column Writing
   A. Determining editorial subject and purpose
      1. Determine the need for elucidation, commentary, argument,
proposal or speculation in terms of reader interest, relevance and
usefulness.
      2. Examine alternative presentation styles: informative,
explanatory, persuasive, sarcasm, humor.
      3. Determine editorial purpose and approach.
   B. Crafting the editorial message
      1. List and describe the tenets of sound argumentation, persuasion,
presentation.
      2. Determine editorial voice and tone.
      3. Examine and respond to opposing views/arguments.
      4. Present and argue the point via the logical progression of facts
using metaphor,   analogy and anecdote where appropriate.
      5. Close the appeal with statement of resolution.
   C. Crafting the personal column
      1. Compare and contrast the presentation of opinion through
editorial and column writing.
      2. List and describe advantages of expressing opinion via a personal
column.
      3. List and describe the roles assumed by column writers.
   D. Application
      1. Using the appropriate purpose and methods of argumentation,
persuasion and presentation, create an editorial or personal column.
      2. Revise and edit to produce final copy.

VI. Review Writing 
   A. Describe the elements of review writing.
      1. Illustrate story structure.
      2. Examine a balance of reporting and opinion.
      3. Exhibit an awareness of biases.
      4. Produce a story using objectivity.
   B. Discuss the basic ingredient of an effective review.
      1. Describe the review’s main point.
      2. Evaluate the theme.
      3. Provide details.
      4. Provide balance.
   C. List the types of reviewers.
      1. Previewer.
      2. Reviewer.
      3. Critic.
      4. Standard bearer.

VII. Online Reporting 
   A. Describe the differences between online readers and traditional
media readers.
   B. List “micro-content” utilized for online reporting.
      1. Headlines
      2. Blurbs
      3. Briefs
   C. Produce stories using online techniques.
      1. Graphics
      2. Photos
      3. Bullet points
      4. Video
      5. Audio

VIII. TV/Video News Writing 
   A. Describe the differences between writing for broadcast/video and
writing for print media.
   B. Illustrate the procedures for developing a news package for
broadcast/video.
      1. Format a script.
      2. Produce the “teaser”.
      3. Structure the story.
   C. Produce a TV/Video news package.
      1. Learn camera operation.
      2. Exhibit knowledge of using basic accessory equipment.
      3. Produce effective lighting and audio of subjects.
      4. Perform standups and voiceovers.
      5. Perform basic non-linear editing of the story.
      6. Discuss lessons learned and problem solving issues.
               
IX. Ethics, Accuracy and Libel
   A. Individual values
      1. Investigate and assess the common conflicts encountered by
journalists.
      2. Differentiate between an ethical dilemma and ethical lapse.
   B. The importance of accuracy
      1. List and define the three cardinal principles of reporting.
      2. List and define the basic steps in collecting and checking
information, including the reliability of sources.
      3. List and define the procedural safeguards for accuracy, including
verification of facts and quotations, and corroboration of critical
information.
   C. Recognizing and avoiding libel
      1. Identify and describe the four elements of libel.
      2. Identify and describe primary and secondary libel defenses.    
      3. Identify and describe the related elements of unreasonable
intrusion and harassment.
      4. Identify and describe landmark libel cases in the United States.
      5. Identify and describe multicultural issues in journalism,
including stereotypes, loaded words, identification of minorities, people
with disabilities and gender differences.
   D. Application
      1. Read and evaluate class assignments and stories in the local
press in terms of ethical, accuracy and libel considerations.
      2. Revise and edit for compliance with the principles of sound
journalism.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grading: All work is graded on a point system and computed into
percentages. The final grade is based on the percentage of total points
earned at semester’s end.

Criteria: Complete, concrete, correct and clear writing is a major goal of
each project assigned. In addition, incorporation of the elements and
characteristics of each style of news story will be evaluated.

Grading Criteria: 
 90 - 100% = A
 80 -  89% = B
 70 -  79% = C
 60 -  69% = D
 Below 60% = F

Point Summary: 
 Written assignments      = 40% - 70% of grade
 Quizzes                  = 10% - 20% of grade
 Attendance/participation = 10% - 20% of grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Knowledge and effective use of the English language, its styles and techniques, plus the ability/desire to investigate, analyze and correlate information and ideas. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 225

  • Title: Promotional Writing*
  • Number: JOUR 225
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: JOUR 125 or JOUR 130.

Description:

Students will study copywriting for promotional purposes, starting with an understanding of the target audience. Emphasis is on writing ads for print, radio and television; direct mail and direct response; the web; and new genres. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the importance of advertising research in understanding the product, the marketplace and the consumer.
  2. Understand the importance of developing advertising strategies that are either product-oriented or consumer-oriented, appeal to rational or emotional factors and stress benefits over features.
  3. Develop a creative brief that guides the creation of an ad.
  4. Explain how advertising is used in all forms of print and electronic media.
  5. Write headlines and slogans; use specific tools and techniques to create persuasive body copy; and edit copy for print ads.
  6. Use specific tools and techniques to create scripts and storyboards for electronic advertising.
  7. Identify the elements of a direct mail package and use specific writing techniques to generate direct response.
  8. Write copy for other genres, including the web, outdoor media and guerilla marketing.
  9. Understand legal considerations governing advertising and how those considerations affect copywriting. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Researching the Ad
   A. Explain the value of creative strategy in advertising's mission of
informing, explaining and reminding.
   B. Explain the value to advertising strategy of knowing the target
audience, product concept, communications media and message strategy.
      1. Explain the purpose of researching and understanding the
product.
      2. Explain the purpose of researching and understanding the
marketplace.
      3. Explain the purpose of researching and understanding the
consumer, including what makes a consumer act.

II. Developing Advertising Strategies
   A. Define strategic approaches for producing a product-oriented or
consumer-oriented ad.
   B. Explain the differences between rational and emotional appeals and
describe the value of each in communicating specific messages.
   C. Explain the importance of stressing benefits, not features, in
advertising.

III. Developing a Creative Brief
   A. Describe the importance of creative briefs to the development of an
ad.
   B. Illustrate how to create such a brief.

IV. Writing Advertisements for Print
   A. Understand the importance of thinking in words and pictures.
      1. Explain the value of an advertising layout in the print process.
      2. List and describe elements of print advertisement.
      3. List and explain the purposes of a visual image in an ad.
      4. Differentiate between illustration and photography and explain
the advantages of each in print advertising.
      5. List and describe formats of advertising design.
      6. List and describe rules of advertising design and explain why
each is important.
   B. Explain how headlines are written.
      1. List and explain the functions of a headline.
      2. List and describe different types of headlines.
      3. Explain the purpose of a subhead.
      4. Explain the use of a slogan, tagline and logo in print
advertising.
   C. List and explain functions of advertising body copy.
      1. Explain the points for writing effective body copy.
      2. Describe styles of body copy.
      3. Explain the importance of voice in writing ad copy.
      4. Describe the importance of style in writing ad copy.
      5. Develop various tools and techniques to use when writing ad
copy.
      6. Explain the value of the Unique Selling Proposition in
advertising copywriting.
   D. Copyediting
      1. Explain the purpose and value of copyediting in the writing
process.

V. Writing for Broadcast Media
   A. Radio
      1. List and explain characteristics of radio as a communication
medium.
      2. List and explain production formats.
      3. List and explain guidelines for creating effective radio copy.
      4. Explain the purpose and use of a script in communicating
information via radio.
      5. List and describe elements involved in radio script formatting.
   B. Television
      1. List and explain characteristics of television as a
communications medium.
      2. List and explain production formats.
      3. Describe the use of the storyboard in communicating information
via television.
      4. List and describe elements involved in storyboard formatting.
      5. Explain the importance of tying audio to video in television
production and communication.

VI. Writing for Direct Mail/Direct Response
   A. Define direct response publishing and list the objectives it
fulfills.
   B. Differentiate between direct mail and direct response
marketing/advertising and explain the purpose of each.
   C. Explain the value of direct publishing/marketing as a part of
integrated marketing communications.
   D. List and describe types of direct response publishing and explain
the type of writing required by each, including catalogs.
   E. List and describe techniques used by direct response writers.
   F. List and describe the types of direct mail publications.
   G. List and describe the elements of a direct mail package and explain
the importance of each.
   H. List and describe special techniques used by direct mail writers.

VII. Writing Online Advertising
   A. Explain the importance of organizing the web site for promotional
purposes.
   B. Explain the elements of writing promotional material for the web.
   C. List and explain various types of online advertising.

VII. Writing Other Genres of Advertising
   A. Understand the techniques for writing outdoor advertising.
   B. Understand the use of guerilla marketing techniques.

IX. Understanding Legal Considerations and How They Affect Copywriting
   A. Explain federal regulations regarding advertising.
   B. Explain what constitutes deceptive advertising.
   C. Explain what must be considered when writing comparative
advertising.
   D. Describe how copyright and privacy law affect advertising.
   E. Describe the ethics of advertising.
     

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Students will be evaluated on the basis of attendance,
homework/classwork writing assignments, quizzes and a final project.

 A. Evaluation:
    Project       15% of grade
    Tests         15% of grade
    Discussion     5% of grade
    Attendance     5% of grade
    Assignments   60% of grade
                  100%
 B. Grading Scale: 
    90 - 100% = A
    80 -  89% = B
    70 -  79% = C
    60 -  69% = D
    Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Complete, concrete, correct and clear thinking is a major goal of each assignment. In addition, knowledge and effective use of the English language, its styles and techniques are required. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 227

  • Title: Basic Video Production
  • Number: JOUR 227
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides students with the fundamentals of video production. The goal is to teach students basic video techniques. Topics covered include technology, lighting, camera operations, audio and editing. Students will gain hands-on experience in the college's Media Production Services Department. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the technology utilized in the TV production industry.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of pre-production techniques.
  3. Demonstrate various components of video equipment for in-studio and field production work.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of audio equipment including various microphones.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of audio recording and mixing techniques.
  6. Describe the non-linear and linear formats used in broadcast production.
  7. Exhibit techniques for lighting a production, both in the field and in the studio.
  8. Prepare a complete program, exhibiting knowledge in editing and post-production techniques. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Television Production Process
   A. Learn the basic television system.
      1. Describe NTSC/HDTV/Compression technology.
      2. Compare the principles of TV scanning.
      3. Ascertain the elements of the video signal.
   B. Depict production elements in the TV field.
      1. Operate the camera.
      2. Produce lighting for indoor and outdoor work.
      3. Produce audio for indoor and outdoor work.
      4. Summarize the basics of videotape recording.
      5. Practice using the switcher.
      6. Produce a program via post-production editing.
      7. Practice using special effects techniques.
   C. Study basic computer technology.
      1. List parts of the computer.
      2. Describe computer interfacing with the TV system.

II. Production and Personnel
   A. Describe the duties of technical personnel.
   B. Describe the duties of non-technical personnel.
   C. Locate elements found in the studio.
   D. Practice with equipment in the control room.

III. Audio Production
   A. Study the fundamentals of audio production.
   B. Practice equipment used in audio production.
      1. Utilize microphones used in production in the field and the
studio.
   C. Participate in production techniques.
      1. Conduct live recording and mixing.
      2. Conduct in-studio recording and mixing.
      3. Conduct post-production recording and mixing.

IV. Video Recording and Storage Systems
   A. Study the fundamentals of video recording and storage.
   B. Explain the various equipment used in video and storage.
      1. Practice with tape systems.
      2. Apply knowledge during field use.
      3. Apply knowledge during studio use.
   C. Learn disc-based recording systems.
      1. Practice with non-linear equipment.
      2. Practice with storage systems equipment.

V. Camera Operation and Shot Composition
   A. Determine basic camera do’s and don’ts.
      1. Practice types of camera movement.
      2. Relate understanding of camera perspectives.
   B. Explore various camera accessories.
      1. Demonstrate tripod usage.
      2. Demonstrate understanding of record formats.
      3. Practice using various lenses.

VI. Producing the Show
   A. Conceptualize the pre-production planning process.
   B. Demonstrate how to direct a show.
      1. Produce a single-camera show.
      2. Produce a multi-camera show.
   C. Explain the director’s roles in production.

VII. Editing a Videotaped Show
   A. Describe the methods of editing.
      1. Work with time-code equipment.
      2. Produce linear-edited programming.
      3. Produce non-linear-edited programming.
   B. Describe system timing and phasing.
   C. Perform A&B-roll editing.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Unit quizzes:                 25% of course grade
2. TV productions and projects:  75% of course grade
                                 100%

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 -  89% = B
70 -  79% = C
60 -  69% = D

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 242

  • Title: Advanced Broadcast Performance: TV*
  • Number: JOUR 242
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: JOUR 202.

Description:

Students will produce news, feature, sports, and interview programming for airing on the college's cable station, video server, and social networks. The development of news stories will be included in hands-on activities throughout the course. Learning composure, focus, and detail in a team information-gathering operation will be emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Effectively use a computer as a research tool for story assignments.
  2. Write and produce news stories for tv/video newscast.
  3. Write in tv newscopy broadcast style using correct script language.
  4. Demonstrate the concept of story commitment and use it to focus on a broadcast news story.
  5. Select and use the appropriate microphones.
  6. Display sequencing and visual composition in the development of stories.
  7. Conduct effective on-air interviews, gaining information from JCCC students and staff for cablecasting on the campus television station.
  8. Prepare to serve, at a moment’s notice, as an on-camera reporter or anchor.
  9. Display coping strategies for dealing with the stresses of television broadcasting business. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Vocal Presentation Ability
   A. Display vocal performance proficiency
   B. Practice effective use of Standard American English
   C. Verbalize using strong grammar skills 

II. Communicating as a TV Announcer
   A. Exhibit professional announcing skills
   B. Utilize microphone technology appropriately
   C. Apply interpretation techniques to a variety of copy
   D. Relate meaning and interest to acquired news and information
   E. Convey interest in campus news and activities
   F. Develop acceptable pronunciation skills
   G. Display proper microphone usage and camera consciousness
   H. Display appropriate on-camera body language

III. Writing and Research
   A. Develop broadcast news gathering and reporting skills
   B. Create tv news stories appropriate to campus audience
   C. Manage time and resources on campus
   D. Exhibit required preparation for newscast and interview performing
   E. Evaluate news story structure and relate information in through
script and visual image
   F. Utilize the world wide web for advanced story development
   G. Produce stories that are accurate, balanced, fair
   H. Collaborate as a team with classmates and peers on television
projects

IV. Performance and the Audience
   A. Develop hones and supportive interpersonal communication skills with
classmates and peers in the newsroom environment
   B. Evaluate professional tv reporting and collaborate with
professionals in the tv news business
   C. Create self evaluations to improve performance skills.
   
V. Interviews:  On and Off Air
   A. Arrange and conduct interviews for news or feature reporting
   B. Develop proficient interviewing skills
   C. Evaluate interviewing procedures and processes
   D. Describe the types of interviews for television
   E. Prepare research materials for interviews
   F. Dress appropriately for interview situations

VI. Developing the Newscast
   A. Display understanding of news value and news criteria
   B. Produce camera-ready Teleprompter copy
   C. Produce effective scripts and props for on-camera use
   D. Prepare for last-minute on-air issues as a reporter or anchor

VII. Ethics and Legal Issues
   A. Learn the codes of ethical standards
   B. Relate sensationalism vs. newsworthiness
   C. Demonstrate understanding of libel and slander laws
   D. Maintain standards of confidentiality when necessary
   E. Demonstrate knowledge of copyright and “fair-use” laws

VIII. Career Consideration and Guidance
   A. Produce a video/demo resume for career advancement
   B. Realize opportunities and obstacles in the tv broadcast industry
   C. Display self-reliance in community and professional contact
development
   D. Display initiative by applying for an internship
   E. Describe the relevance of motivation and networking in hands-on
internships

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations          10 - 20% of grade
Projects/Assignments  80 - 90%of grade
Total                100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%    
  B = 80 –  89%  
  C = 70 –  79%  
  D = 60 -  69%  
  F =  0 –  59%    

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 247

  • Title: Advanced Video Production*
  • Number: JOUR 247
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: JOUR 227.

Description:

Students will direct, produce, and edit programming for distribution via the college's media outlets. Students will develop the technical skills involved in both studio production and field production as well as advanced skills in camera operations, multi-camera directing, lighting, audio production, and graphics. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define terminology relevant to studio and field productions.
  2. Identify and describe the function of equipment used in studio and field productions.
  3. Exhibit knowledge of the skills used in video production by operating video equipment used in video productions.
  4. Explain and demonstrate proper preparation techniques for producing television programming.
  5. Identify, define, and perform the responsibilities of each member of a studio crew.
  6. Demonstrate digital video effects and explain their practical uses in video productions.
  7. Explain and demonstrate studio lighting techniques.
  8. Perform audio production techniques and editing for studio programming.
  9. Perform proper lighting skills for studio and field productions.
  10. Demonstrate the above competencies during actual studio productions.
  11. Work collaboratively with performance talent in the production of newscasts.
  12. Display coping strategies for dealing with the stresses of the video production business. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Video Production Terminology
   A. Describe technical terms used in the industry.
   B. Describe production terms used in the industry.
   C. Demonstrate the function of all video equipment used in studio and
field productions
   D. Identify and define the responsibilities of each member of a studio
production crew.

II. Camera Techniques
   A. Identify and display effective use of studio cameras.
   B. Identify and display effective use of hand-held cameras.
   C. Create shots effects using switches on cameras.

III. Lighting Techniques
   A. Exhibit knowledge and use of studio lighting instruments.
   B. Exhibit knowledge and use of field lighting instruments.
   C. Evaluate and fix light intensity, lamps, and color media.
   D. Demonstrate knowledge of proper lighting techniques.
   E. Differentiate between various balancing intensities.

IV. Switching Techniques
   A. Demonstrate basic switcher functions.
   B. Evaluate and demonstrate switcher layout.
   C. Perform basic and creative switcher operation.
   D. Relate the differences between switcher types and functions.
   E. Demonstrate audio production skills using switcher.

V. Program Production
   A. Develop preproduction planning skills.
      1. Generate programming ideas
      2. Present proposals
      3. Write scripts
   B. Develop program coordination skills.
      1. Work with co-workers and talent
      2. Relate understanding of facility operations
      3. Create and maintain program and crew schedules

VI. The Director in Preproduction
   A. Convey and develop the director’s roles.
   B. Coordinate preproduction activities.
   C. Develop and manage a support staff for studio and field
productions.

VII. Digital Video Effects
   A. Produce intros/outros/promos using graphic effects technology.
   B. Create effects programming that brings out interest in show
production.
   C. Enhance productions through graphic effects.

VIII. Collaboration Skills with Production Personnel
   A. Communicate effectively with production (non-technical) personnel.
   B. Collaborate and work professionally with technical personnel and
crew.
   C. Collaborate and maintain interpersonal relationships with television
talent.

IX. Studio Production
   A. Demonstrate multi-camera studio directing.
      1. Practice directing from the control room
      2. Plan and coordinate rehearsals
      3. Schedule a timeline
      4. Demonstrate techniques for directing the show
   B. Apply skills necessary to control the clock
   C. Demonstrate single-camera directing.

X. Ethics and Legal Issues
   A. List the industry codes of ethical standards.
   B. Explain libel and slander in video production and editing.
   C. Maintain standards of confidentiality.

XI. Career Consideration
   A. Produce a video resume for career guidance.
   B. Identify opportunities and obstacles in the video production field.
   C. Display self reliance in community and professional contact
development.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations          15% of grade
Projects/Assignments  60% of grade
Final Project         25% of course grade
 Total                100%


Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%    
  B = 80 –  89%  
  C = 70 –  79%  
  D = 60 -  69%  
  F =  0 –  59%  

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 252

  • Title: Advanced Broadcast Performance II: TV*
  • Number: JOUR 252
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: JOUR 242.

Description:

This course builds upon the skills learned in the Advanced Broadcast Performance course. Students will produce news, features, sports, and interview programming for airing on the college's cable station, video server, and social networks. The development of news packages, event reporting, and extended coverage of campus events will be included in hands-on activities throughout the course. Learning composure, focus, and detail in a team information-gathering operation will be emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Effectively use a computer as a research tool for story assignments.
  2. Write and produce news packages for TV/video newscasts.
  3. Write in TV news copy broadcast style using correct script language.
  4. Perform in-studio shots for news story lead-ins.
  5. Demonstrate the concept of story commitment and use it to focus on a broadcast news package.
  6. Select and use the appropriate microphones.
  7. Display sequencing and visual composition in the development of stories.
  8. Schedule and conduct taped interviews.
  9. Prepare to serve, at a moment's notice, as an on-camera reporter or anchor.
  10. Describe the legal and ethical issues facing broadcasters.
  11. Display problem-solving strategies for dealing with the deadlines of the television broadcasting business. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Vocal Presentation Ability
   A. Display vocal performance proficiency
   B. Apply strategies of a strong vocal personality
   C. Practice effective use of Standard American English
   D. Verbalize using strong grammar skills

II. Communicating as a TV Reporter/Announcer
   A. Exhibit professional reporting and announcing skills
   B. Apply interpretation techniques to a variety of copy
   C. Utilize microphone technology appropriately
   D. Relate meaning and interest to acquired news and information
   E. Maintain professional interpersonal skills with the JCCC campus
community
   F. Convey interest in campus news and activities
   G. Demonstrate acceptable pronunciation skills
   H. Display proper microphone usage and camera consciousness
   I. Display appropriate on-camera body language

III. Writing and Research: Story Commitment
   A. Develop broadcast news gathering and reporting skills in person and
using computers
   B. Create tv news stories appropriate to campus audience in broadcast
style
   C. Manage time and production team schedules on campus
   D. Exhibit required preparation for and interview performing 
   E. Evaluate news story structure and relate information in through
script sequencing and visual composition
   F. Discover various methods of researching campus news and activities
   G. Utilize the world wide web for advanced story research
   H. Produce stories that are accurate, balanced, fair
   I. Collaborate as a team with classmates and production peers on
television projects

IV. Performance and the Audience
   A. Develop honest and supportive interpersonal communication
relationships with classmates in the newsroom environment
   B. Evaluate professional tv reporting and collaborate with
professionals in the tv news business
   C. Create self-evaluations to improve performance skills

V. Interviews: On and Off Air
   A. Arrange and conduct interviews for news or feature reporting
   B. Develop proficient interviewing skills
   C. Evaluate interviewing procedures and processes
   D. Describe the types of interviews for television
   E. Prepare research materials for interviews
   F. Exhibit control of the interview
   G. Conduct well-structured broadcast interviews
   H. Dress appropriately for interview situations

VI. Developing the Newscast/Program
   A. Display understanding of news value and news criteria
   B. Produce camera-ready Teleprompter copy
   C. Produce effective scripts and props for on-camera use
   D. Prepare for last-minute on-air issues as a reporter or anchor
   E. Develop sources for acquiring information for news or sports
   F. Exhibit enthusiasm for covering news or sports
      1. Play by play
      2. Color commentary
   G. Demonstrate presentation techniques for feature stories
   H. Display adlibbing qualities
   I. Exhibit skills for other types of performances, including weather
casting and infomercials
   J. Prepare for last-minute on-air issues as a reporter or anchor
   K. Demonstrate skills of effective Teleprompter operation
   L. Predict strategies to use for last-minute issues that may arise
   M. Exhibit qualities of the news team

VII. Ethics and Legal Issues
   A. Learn the codes of ethical standards
   B. Demonstrate understanding of libel and slander laws
   C. Relate sensationalism vs. newsworthiness
   D. Maintain standards of confidentiality when necessary
   E. Demonstrate knowledge of copyright and "fair use" laws

VIII. Career Consideration and Guidance
   A. Produce a video/demo resume for career advancement
   B. Realize opportunities and obstacles in the tv broadcast industry
   C. Display self-reliance in community and professional contact
development
   D. Display initiative by applying for an internship
   E. Describe the relevance of motivation and networking in hands-on
internships

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Assignments      10-20% of grade
Package Projects 80-90% of grade
Total            100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 -  89%
C = 70 -  79%
D = 60 -  69%
F =  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 257

  • Title: Advanced Video Production II*
  • Number: JOUR 257
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: JOUR 247.

Description:

This course builds upon the Advanced Video Production course. Students will direct, produce, and edit programming for distribution via the college's media outlets. They will enhance their advanced technical skills involved in both studio production and field production as well as advanced skills in camera operations, multi-camera directing, lighting, audio production, and graphics. The development of writing for media programming will also be emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe terminology relevant to studio and field productions.
  2. Utilize equipment used in studio and field productions.
  3. Operate audio and video equipment used in video productions.
  4. Demonstrate proper preparation techniques for producing television programming from brainstorming to final program segment editing.
  5. Identify, define, and perform the responsibilities of each member of a studio crew.
  6. Demonstrate digital video effects and explain their practical uses in video productions.
  7. Demonstrate studio lighting techniques by preparing for studio and field productions.
  8. Perform audio production techniques and editing for studio programming.
  9. Demonstrate the above competencies during actual studio and field productions.
  10. Work collaboratively with performance talent in the production of newscasts and feature programming.
  11. Plan and write program material for field and studio productions.
  12. Display coping strategies for dealing with the stresses of the video production business.
  13. Collaborate with peers on student media projects, taking a leadership role in those productions.
  14. Describe the ethical and legal issues facing the video production industry.
  15. Produce a video/demo resume for use in a potential internship or job interview. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Video Production Terminology
   A. Describe technical terms used in the industry.
   B. Describe production terms used in the industry.
   C. Demonstrate the function of all video equipment used in studio and
field productions.
   D. Identify and define the responsibilities of each member of a studio
production crew.
   E. Utilize terminology during the production of studio and field work.

II. Camera Techniques
   A. Identify and display effective use of studio cameras.
   B. Identify and display effective use of hand-held cameras.
   C. Create shots effects using switches on cameras.
   D. Demonstrate advanced camera techniques through practice with
on-camera performers.

III. Lighting Techniques
   A. Exhibit knowledge and use of studio lighting instruments.
   B. Exhibit knowledge and use of field lighting instruments.
   C. Evaluate and fix light intensity, lamps, and color media.
   D. Demonstrate knowledge of proper lighting techniques.
   E. Differentiate between various balancing intensities.
   F. Collaborate with peers to produce proper lighting in various campus
locations.

IV. Audio Techniques
   A. Demonstrate use of proper audio equipment during studio and field
productions.
   B. Display professionalism in determining audio levels for a variety of
production situations.
   C. Perform audio editing and audio enhancement skills to improve aural
studio and field production work.

V. Switching Techniques
   A. Demonstrate advanced switcher functions.
   B. Evaluate and demonstrate switcher layout.
   C. Perform advanced and creative switcher operation.
   D. Relate the differences between switcher types and functions.
   E. Demonstrate audio production skills using switcher.
   F. Using the switcher, produce a program segment.

VI. Program Production
   A. Develop preproduction planning skills.
      1. Generate programming ideas.
      2. Present proposals and program material in proper written form and
style.
      3. Collaborate on scripts with on-camera performers.
   B. Develop program coordination skills.
      1. Work with co-workers and talent.
      2. Demonstrate understanding of facility operations during
production segments.
      3. Create and maintain program and crew schedules.
      4. Manage a program segment with producers and performers.

VII. The Director in Preproduction
   A. Convey and develop the director's roles.
   B. Coordinate preproduction activities.
   C. Develop and manage a support staff for studio and field
productions.
   D. Collaborate with performance talent during preparation of program
segments.

VIII. Digital Video Effects
   A. Produce intro/outros/promos using graphic effects technology.
   B. Create effects programming that brings out interest in show
production.
   C. Enhance productions through graphic effects.
   D. Assist other video production students in the production of digital
video effects.

IX. Collaboration Skills with Production Personnel
   A. Communicate effectively with production (non-technical) personnel.
   B. Collaborate and work professionally with technical personnel and
crew.
   C. Collaborate and maintain interpersonal relationships with television
talent.
   D. Demonstrate importance of collaboration during program segment
writing and editing.

X. Studio Production
   A. Demonstrate multi-camera studio directing.
      1. Direct programming segments and programs from the control room.
      2. Plan and coordinate rehearsals.
      3. Schedule a timeline.
      4. Demonstrate techniques for directing the show.
      5. Manage group work among peers in a production process.
   B. Apply skills necessary to control the clock.
   C. Demonstrate single-camera directing.
   D. Collaborate and assist peers during studio productions.

XI. Ethics and Legal Issues
   A. Describe the industry codes of ethical standards.
   B. Demonstrate knowledge of libel and slander laws in video production
and editing.
   C. Maintain standards of confidentiality when necessary.
   D. Demonstrate knowledge of copyright and "fair use" laws.

XII. Career Consideration and Guidance
   A. Discover opportunities for submitting work in student video
contests.
   B. Produce a video/demo resume for career guidance.
   C. Identify opportunities and obstacles in the video production field.
   D. Display self reliance in community and professional contact
development.
   E. Display initiative by applying for a hands-on internship in the
campus media production facilities and/or off-campus professional
production.
   F. Describe the relevance of motivation and networking in hands-on
internships.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Projects/Assignments 100% of grade
Total                100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 -  89%
C = 70 -  79%
D = 60 -  69%
F =  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 267

  • Title: Advanced Video Production III*
  • Number: JOUR 267
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: JOUR 257.

Description:

This course continues the advancement of technical skills offered in Advanced Video Production II. Enhancement of skills includes program production of electronic student media. Application of technical skills in studio and field production, multi-camera directing, lighting, audio production and graphics will evolve through hands-on training. Advanced work in writing for student media programming is emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Exhibit a complete knowledge of, and the skills necessary to oversee, produce and direct an entire episode of the student news show JCAV news.
  2. Produce and direct a live show for public viewing on both the internet and cable TV.
  3. Adapt all video formats to a workable medium on the internet using applicable software for viewing on social media outlets.
  4. Create advanced graphics for use in productions for the college's Video Production department.
  5. Perform single camera remotes using the college's Video Production equipment as assigned by the instructor.
  6. Produce, collaborate, and oversee a production with a client through the college's Video Production department in both the pre- and post-production of a dual camera remote.
  7. Produce, direct, and coordinate all pre- and post-production of a live video program using the professional equipment in the college's Video Production department under the supervision of the instructor.
  8. Assist in a variety of productions in consultation with the course instructor.
  9. Apply the above skills and experience towards a potential internship with either the JCCC Video Production department or another comparable video production house. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Graphics, Video Conversion and PowerPoint
   A. Create applicable graphics for productions using editing and
graphics software.
   B. Create a PowerPoint presentation employing all the usable media
elements.
   C. Perform DVD authoring techniques for use in both classroom and
professional applications on campus.
   D. Create digital signage graphics for use on productions.
   E. Create graphics through the digital switcher used by the college's
Video Production department for use in live productions.

II. Development of JCAV News Program
   A. Coordinate talent and videographers for a news show.
   B. Manage the pre production of graphics and script for a show.
   C. Set up lighting for both program tease and actual taping.
   D. Supervise final post production process of both editing and transfer
to workable medium for both internet and cable TV.

III. Single Camera Remote Productions
   A. Train on the effective use of the required video camera for use in
the field.
   B. Utilize microphones and portable lighting equipment as needed.
   C. Participate in four single camera remotes, the first to be
supervised by a peer. The remaining three unsupervised based on skill
levels.
   D. Properly transfer program from original medium to an acceptable
format for the client's use (tape, DVD, etc.).
   E. Learn the basic elements of backpack journalism, including remote
video production and editing.

IV. The Live Show: A Multi-Camera Event
   A. Demonstrate required skills necessary in preparation for a show to
be switched live.
   B. Coordinate and collaborate with crew and talent based on client's
needs for pre- and post-production work.
   C. Develop video segments to be played during production.
   D. Develop graphics, music, or other required media for live
production.
   E. Direct a live show on a professional digital switcher used by the
college's Video Production department.
   F. Transfer finished media to a workable format for client's needs.

V. Writing for Programming
   A. Produce promos, teases, and scripts for a variety of program
genres.
   B. Collaborate with Performance and Production students in final script
development and formatting.
   C. Prepare detailed program schedules for use during pre- and
post-production work.

VI. Career Consideration and Guidance
   A. Discover opportunities for submitting work in student video
contests.
   B. Identify opportunities and obstacles in the video production field.
   C. Display self-reliance in community and professional contact
development.
   D. Describe the relevance of motivation and networking in hands-on
internships.

VII. Professional DVD Authoring
   A. Compile necessary medium for a professional-looking DVD production
reel for use in future employment opportunities.
   B. Create a DVD in authoring software with approval by
instructor.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

100  Projects/Assignments
100% Total

Grade Criteria:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = 0-59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 269

  • Title: Journalism Internship*
  • Number: JOUR 269
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3.75
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3.75

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Instructor approval; completion of 3 credit hours in journalism/ media communications course at JCCC or other college with a grade of C or higher.

Description:

A journalism/media internship allows students to gain work experience at an approved training center under staff supervision. Emphasis is on learning new skills related to a particular program or department at a media facility. Students may learn the application of writing and production techniques needed to produce video and broadcast news, produce advertising, or public relations promotional copy. On-the-job training includes a minimum of 60 hrs. for the semester by arrangement.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Apply good writing and/or production techniques for print news, broadcast news, and/ or advertising or public relations promotion or copywriting.
  2. Perform the basic skills necessary in the promotion associated with a media facility.
  3. Exhibit a more specific understanding of a journalism/media field.
  4. Form attitudes and work habits needed to reach career objectives.
  5. Complete written work as prescribed by on-site supervisor and JCCC internship adviser. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Basics of Interning 
  A. Plan appropriate term for internship.  
  B. Complete application procedures and paperwork. 
  C. Determine applicable writing or production skills and the medium most appropriate.  
  D. Conduct interviews with prospective internship site supervisors.  
  E. Prepare your plan for work hours and responsibilities.  

II. Fulfilling Internship Responsibilities  
  A. Establish working relationships with supervisor and worksite employees.  
  B. Determine legal requirements associated with the work environment.  
  C. Execute assignments and activities as determined by work site supervisor.  
  D. Document evidence of learning via assignments and contact with campus adviser.  
  E. Write a final paper detailing internship experience.  
  F. Complete internship site evaluation form.  

III. Making the Most of an Internship  
  A. Determine the positive and negative aspects of your internship. 
  B. Describe the experience for future interns.  
  C. Communicate learned information to campus internship adviser.  
  D. Evaluate the value of internships across the curriculum.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Completed paperwork & registration; hours fulfilled; favorable
progress made as determined by internship adviser: 30-50% of grade 
Midterm obligations: 10-20% of Grade  
Final semester visit: 10-20% of grade  
Final paper: 15-20% of grade  
Supervisor evaluations: 10-20% of grade 100% 

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 270

  • Title: Journalism Internship*
  • Number: JOUR 270
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 7.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 7.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Instructor approval; completion of 3 credit hours in journalism/ media communications course at JCCC or other college with a grade of C or higher.

Description:

A journalism/media internship allows students to gain work experience at an approved training center under staff supervision. Emphasis is on learning new skills related to a particular program or department at a media facility. Students may learn the application of writing and production techniques needed to produce video and broadcast news, produce advertising, or public relations promotional copy. On-the-job training includes a minimum of 120 hrs. for the semester by arrangement.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Apply good writing and/or production techniques for print news, broadcast news, and/ or advertising or public relations promotion or copywriting.
  2. Perform the basic skills necessary in the promotion associated with a media facility.
  3. Exhibit a more specific understanding of a journalism/media field.
  4. Form attitudes and work habits needed to reach career objectivea.
  5. Complete written work as prescribed by on-site supervisor and JCCC internship adviser. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Basics of Interning  
  A. Plan appropriate term for internship.  
  B. Complete application procedures and paperwork.  
  C. Determine applicable skills and the medium most appropriate.  
  D. Conduct interviews with prospective internship site supervisors.  
  E. Prepare your plan for work hours and responsibilities.  

II. Fulfilling Internship Responsibilities  
  A. Establish working relationships with supervisor and worksite employees.  
  B. Determine legal requirements associated with the work environment.  
  C. Execute assignments and activities as determined by work site supervisor.  
  D. Document evidence of learning via assignments and contact with campus adviser.   
  E. Write a final paper detailing internship experience.  
  F. Complete internship site evaluation form.  

III. Making the Most of an Internship  
  A. Determine the positive and negative aspects of your internship.
  B. Describe the experience for future interns.  
  C. Communicate learned information to campus internship adviser.  
  D. Evaluate the value of internships across the curriculum.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Completed paperwork & registration; hours fulfilled; favorable
progress made as determined by internship adviser: 30-50% of grade 
Midterm obligations: 10-20% of Grade  
Final semester visit: 10-20% of grade  
Final paper: 15-20% of grade  
Supervisor evaluations: 10-20% of grade 100% 

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 271

  • Title: Journalism Internship*
  • Number: JOUR 271
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 12
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 12

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Instructor approval; completion of six credit hours in journalism/media communications at JCCC or another college with a grade of "C" or higher in those 6 hours.

Description:

A journalism/media internship allows students to gain work experience at an approved training center under staff supervision. Emphasis is on learning new skills related to a particular program or department at a media facility. Students may learn the application of writing techniques needed to produce and broadcast news, and produce advertising or public relations promotional copy. On-the-job training involves approximately 15-20 hrs./wk. by arrangement.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Apply good writing techniques for print news, broadcast news, and/ or advertising or public relations promotion or copywriting.
  2. Perform the basic skills necessary in the promotion associated with a media facility.
  3. Exhibit a more specific understanding of a journalism/media field.
  4. Form attitudes and work habits needed to reach your career objective.
  5. Complete written work as prescribed by your work supervisor and your JCCC internship adviser.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Basics of Interning
   A. Plan appropriate term for internship.
   B. Complete application procedures and paperwork.
   C. Determine applicable skills and the medium most appropriate.
   D. Conduct interviews with prospective internship site supervisors.
   E. Prepare your plan for work hours and responsibilities.

II. Fulfilling Internship Responsibilities
   A. Establish working relationships with supervisor and worksite
employees.
   B. Determine legal requirements associated with the work environment.
   C. Execute assignments and activities as determined by work site
supervisor.
   D. Document evidence of learning via assignments and contact with
campus adviser.
   E. Write a final paper detailing internship experience.
   F. Complete internship site evaluation form.

III. Making the Most of an Internship
   A. Determine the positive and negative aspects of your internship.
   B. Describe the experience for future interns.
   C. Communicate learned information to campus internship adviser.
   D. Evaluate the value of internships across the curriculum.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Completed paperwork & registration; hours fulfilled; favorable
progress made as determined by internship adviser: 50% of grade
Midterm obligations:                               10% of Grade
Final semester visit:                               5% of grade
Final paper:                                       15% of grade
Supervisor evaluations:                            20% of grade
                                                  100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

JOUR 291

No information found.